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Old 08-29-2011, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,221 posts, read 4,651,296 times
Reputation: 1681

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Quote:
Originally Posted by arfindlan View Post
One concrete slab in the garage is raised by approximately 1-2" and another slab has a crack down the middle. I also noticed very slight cracks in the wood siding, and in one spot inside. Is the cracks normal wear/tear? The house is less than 10 years old.
More than an inch of heave on a garage floor is significant IMHO...I have a friend here that had his garage floor demolished and re-poured for less than that. Hard to say if the siding cracks are indicative of foundation problems without seeing them.

That said, how much is your peace of mind worth? If there's any doubt, why take the risk of strapping on a potentially ticking time bomb?

Caveat emptor!
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:24 PM
 
10,868 posts, read 41,128,193 times
Reputation: 14009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I guess it would help if we defined some sort of "what's normal" movement from what is truly a problem amount of up/down movement.
If a whole slab uniformly moves up and down 1/4"-1/2" due to seasonal temperature variations, I'll accept that as "normal" in many areas of Colorado.

If one slab in a garage of several sections rises any more than 1/4" from it's adjoining pour at a control joint or a junction, then I'm looking for the causation. With slabs on grade, site prep is a critical issue and my next step is a moisture vapor test for the slabs. A wet slab (say, more than 10-12 lbs/1000 sq ft) that's heaved is very indicative of a bentonite problem.

The OP says they're seeing 1-2" of heaving. That's way up there for a red flag for a serious problem with their site/prep.
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:44 PM
 
20,301 posts, read 37,784,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arfindlan View Post
We're in the process of buying a home that has a heaving concrete garage floor. The impact is that water off the car will drain back towards the house.

Is heaving common in Colorado due to the expansive clay soil? Should we be concerned about the foundation's integrity or risk of further heaving? Would we expect to see similiar behavior in the basement at some point? Any idea how much it costs to replace a concrete slab?
It seems the consensus is that you should RUN, not walk, away from this home; there are just too many nice home here at reduced prices from which to pick to let yourself buy a problem property. We all hate to be nosy, but have you signed a contract yet?

Two inches of heave, and cracking wood seems like a huge danger signal.

If there's no contract, I'd walk. if there is a contract and it's subject to a home inspection, then I'd get an expert opinion and demand remediation or a major price break to buy this unit.

My sister knows a couple (he's a doctor) who had a very nice NEW home here and the soil problems ruined the house in a year's time - the problems were so bad the house was actually condemned.
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Old 08-30-2011, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Edgewater, CO
531 posts, read 866,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arfindlan View Post
One concrete slab in the garage is raised by approximately 1-2" and another slab has a crack down the middle. I also noticed very slight cracks in the wood siding, and in one spot inside. Is the cracks normal wear/tear? The house is less than 10 years old.
That is not normal wear and tear for a house less than ten years old. Stay out of that entire development.
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Old 08-31-2011, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Colorado
554 posts, read 1,305,418 times
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If the OP doesn't heed the good advice from this forum they will regret it. My parents house has been "sinking" for years now. Their doors don't fit in the frames anymore. The fireplace is literally pulling away from the house and you can see daylight through it. The steps leading out to the garage have pulled and separated from the floor a couple of inches! The house itself looks really good though with all of the work they put in it. But they should have mud-jacked it or something first. Just about every house on their block is like that. If they had only known about the poor soil 30 yrs ago I don't think they would've bought that house.
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Old 08-31-2011, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Colorado
486 posts, read 1,234,640 times
Reputation: 639
yeah, the fact that the house is only ten years old with that type of settling is very concerning.

My first thought when I read the OP was that "oh, that's so common in all these old houses in Colorado" - old meaning houses that are 100 plus years like my own. You see settling, foundation heaving, etc. all the time in older houses in older historic areas (such as Old Colorado City).

But in a house that is only ten years old......yikes!

Sunspirit makes some good points about the expansive soils in Colorado.
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