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Old 03-09-2008, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,977 posts, read 98,832,039 times
Reputation: 31386

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I would say your assessment is accurate.

 
Old 03-09-2008, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Grand Lake, Colorado
279 posts, read 588,730 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I would say your assessment is accurate.
I was hoping to be wrong, but now can you explain why this mentality exists?
 
Old 03-09-2008, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Chesterfield, MO
386 posts, read 1,500,951 times
Reputation: 179
Maybe that used to be the case--like, early 90s, when the Great Invasion (lol. j/k) first started. But now...? Not so much. I think the new us/them is white/latino. It is widely assumed these days that you are not from Denver if you live in Denver. Colorado may not be the most welcoming place in the world....but I think there are just far too many out-of-state newcomers to warrant any real us/them dichotomy or even discrimination. I don't see a lot of that going on. At least not in the cities. Perhaps in rural Colorado--where you have a lot of people like Jazzlover who are bunkering down for the secession of Colorado to California--you'll see that. But I don't think that's a very accurate description of the reality of things....
 
Old 03-09-2008, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,977 posts, read 98,832,039 times
Reputation: 31386
The early 90s weren't the only time. When we came here in the early 80s, it was in full swing. Then the stock market crash of 1987 happened, and a lot of people, including us, left. (We came back in 1989 when we had the opportunity.) The early 90s were pretty bad, and it was aimed at Calfifornians then. Prior to that, it was mostly directed at easterners and Texans. I don't notice it any more, but my daughter tells me her grad school friends complain about it, so I guess it's still out there. This is in Denver, BTW. I remember the 90s. People complained about having to increase taxes to build new schools, roads, etc. They didn't seem to look at the cost-benefit analysis. I think many people are/were just nostalgic for the way "It Used to Be". I have met people who have told me they can remember when Wadsworth was a dirt road. I remember when Arapahoe Rd in Boulder County was dirt east of Lafayette. The onl;y thing constant is change.
 
Old 03-09-2008, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Grand Lake, Colorado
279 posts, read 588,730 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestCoDude View Post
Maybe that used to be the case--like, early 90s, when the Great Invasion (lol. j/k) first started. But now...? Not so much. I think the new us/them is white/latino. It is widely assumed these days that you are not from Denver if you live in Denver. Colorado may not be the most welcoming place in the world....but I think there are just far too many out-of-state newcomers to warrant any real us/them dichotomy or even discrimination. I don't see a lot of that going on. At least not in the cities. Perhaps in rural Colorado--where you have a lot of people like Jazzlover who are bunkering down for the secession of Colorado to California--you'll see that. But I don't think that's a very accurate description of the reality of things....
I agree, that's why I said it's only a small percentage, and I mean small. But that small percentage seem to have loud voices, and you obviously were reading my mind with your comments (above in red)...

Just to clarify, I'm white and I bought in the mountains.
 
Old 03-09-2008, 05:41 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,866 posts, read 7,098,661 times
Reputation: 1543
Colorado isn't immune to that sentiment. There's alot of people with that attitude here in Ohio.

Sort of like, if you aren't Italian, you're worthless.

There's a joke going around here that people only take you seriously if your name ends in a vowel
 
Old 03-09-2008, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Grand Lake, Colorado
279 posts, read 588,730 times
Reputation: 211
I see many threads where people ask about moving to Colorado, more specifically younger people who want to ski and snowboard, and they get answers from certain individuals about how low the wages are, how difficult its going to be and everything negative. Now let me make something clear, I'm all for true and honest advice, the more the better, but I feel it could be given in a friendlier and positive manner, rather than make the person feel disheartened.
I wonder if the intention of the advice, correct as it may be, is just a camouflage for saying "stay away, I don't want you moving here".
 
Old 03-09-2008, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Colorado
346 posts, read 1,418,062 times
Reputation: 261
Although there are plenty of things wrong with California, one thing that I have always appreciated is that I've never felt an "us/them" mentality. There are people here from all over the world, let alone another state. In my kids' classroom of 20 students, there are only 4 who are Caucasian (two of which are my own twins). The rest are either Hispanic, Middle Eastern, African-American, Indian, Vietnamese or Thai. Pretty hard to have an "us/them" mentality in that type of setting. I'm looking forward to many things about moving to Colorado, but I won't enjoy any type of bigoted attitudes, if they do indeed exist and are prevalent.

I've also read on this forum that people in Colorado don't want to hear about your previous location. I find that ridiculous! Isn't it possible to embrace Colorado but still have fond memories of where you came from? Most people naturally like to discuss their upbringing, where they went to college, etc. That's often how you get to know someone. I can understand people getting frustrated with constant comparisons, like "In California we had blah, blah blah..." but other than that, I don't get what would be such a turn-off about discussing aspects of the "other" place, wherever that may have been. I find it interesting to learn about other states, cultures, etc. But maybe I'm in the minority...
 
Old 03-09-2008, 06:27 PM
 
Location: CO
2,533 posts, read 5,819,244 times
Reputation: 3295
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minx View Post
I have noticed a distinct "us" and "them" attitude with a percentage of people living in Colorado. Almost like its belongs to them and no one else is welcome. I am not referring to everyone in the state, just a small percentage who seem to have this attitude. Just like we say "you can't pick your relatives" we also can't pick where we are born, but feel we have the right to move if we choose.

I have bought, and I have moved, and I love it. The people I have met have been some of the most warm and welcoming people I have ever met, but I don't get that impression from everyone.

Am I reading the vibes correctly, or have I got it totally wrong?...
When my grandparents moved here in 1900, not everyone welcomed them. Enough did. Make your friends among those who are warm and welcoming, don't worry about the others.
 
Old 03-09-2008, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Grand Lake, Colorado
279 posts, read 588,730 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebagirl View Post
Although there are plenty of things wrong with California, one thing that I have always appreciated is that I've never felt an "us/them" mentality. There are people here from all over the world, let alone another state. In my kids' classroom of 20 students, there are only 4 who are Caucasian (two of which are my own twins). The rest are either Hispanic, Middle Eastern, African-American, Indian, Vietnamese or Thai. Pretty hard to have an "us/them" mentality in that type of setting. I'm looking forward to many things about moving to Colorado, but I won't enjoy any type of bigoted attitudes, if they do indeed exist and are prevalent.

I've also read on this forum that people in Colorado don't want to hear about your previous location. I find that ridiculous! Isn't it possible to embrace Colorado but still have fond memories of where you came from? Most people naturally like to discuss their upbringing, where they went to college, etc. That's often how you get to know someone. I can understand people getting frustrated with constant comparisons, like "In California we had blah, blah blah..." but other than that, I don't get what would be such a turn-off about discussing aspects of the "other" place, wherever that may have been. I find it interesting to learn about other states, cultures, etc. But maybe I'm in the minority...
Rebagirl, don't let my observations deter you from moving to Colorado if that is truly your desire. My obervations have been from the very few monority and mainly aimed at the young who want to ski and snowboard. I may be Caucasian, but I did it from the other side of the planet.
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