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Old 09-07-2011, 11:01 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,159,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You didn't say anything about raising a family in the post I quoted.
But the OP did.
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Old 09-08-2011, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,053 posts, read 99,058,791 times
Reputation: 31544
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
But the OP did.
Nice try. Your post referenced someone who said you have to make at least $13/hr or you're better off on welfare. Your source didn't talk at all about # of people being supported on this $13/hr.
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Old 10-02-2011, 11:45 PM
 
59 posts, read 98,197 times
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Default Old Town Arvada

I just relocated from Denver to Upstate NY. I spent 3.4 yrs in Colorado working for a major corp. Everything you read and hear about CO. is true, the good & bad. Sunny all the time w/very little humidity. The winters on the front range closest to the mountains are mild, sort of protected from most major storms. All the rain, hail & tornados are out east: Commerce City, Brighten, etc. When it snows, it is true, the sun comes out and with in a day or two it's gone. 3 feet of snow fell May 25th 2009 and within 2 days it was sunny & 70 degrees? They do not use salt on the streets and the temp at it's worst is -4 only for a few days. The cheapest living is for sure out on the plains. The closer to the mountains the more expensive it gets. I lived in a nice area called Olde Town Arvada in the Water Tower Flats. It has a small downtown area with plenty of restaurants, pubs, shops, etc. Almost anything you want is with in a few miles. Lowes, grocery stores, cinama's, schools, parks, etc. Down town Denver is 15-20 min. cab ride ($20) and the mountains about 9 miles away. It is not cheap anywhere out there. You will have sticker shock for awhile if buying. Most decent 1-bedroom apts are around $880-1100 a month, anything cheaper and buyer beware. I seen a lot of people come and go during my 3 yrs but I really loved it there.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:40 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,159,132 times
Reputation: 9066
Quote:
Originally Posted by pitriz View Post
They do not use salt on the streets and the temp at it's worst is -4 only for a few days.
That is not really true. Most places in Colorado do not use "salt," as in sodium chloride. What IS used here on streets, roads, and highways in winter is magnesium chloride, by the railroad tank cars full. Magnesium chloride is actually more corrosive than sodium chloride, and is extremely difficult to wash off--and has been documented to cause severe long-term damage to vehicles, especially to suspension and mechanical components that are exposed to it. It used to be that Coloradans were expected to (and did) learn how to drive on snowpacked roads with sand and salt use fairly limited. Today, Colorado road maintenances agencies spend scads of taxpayer money to spray Colorado roads with highly corrosive mag chloride so people can continue to drive like idiots with no clue of how to drive in winter driving conditions.
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Old 10-03-2011, 01:12 PM
 
808 posts, read 1,179,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I should also note that anyone who says something like, "I moved here in 1996 and everything worked out great for me," is making an irrelevant comment. The economy of both the nation and this state has changed completely since then--probably for good--and the days of ease of finding and holding employment in Colorado are OVER. It's a new and very brutal economic environment, like it or not.
You are dramatically overstating the "facts on the ground" for those who moved to Colorado in 1996 and sought employment. There was no "ease" involved then, nor do I suspect there has ever been in Colorado. I've moved to Colorado (with impeccable academic/professional credentials) and searched for employment not once but TWICE. Averaging my two job searches yields an average of three years (six years total without income yet through savings and frugal living never once relied on a govt or family handouts). The critical piece of this equation I believe you consistently miss is that - even with this hardship as a given - it is STILL possible to be vastly better off relative to having not taken the risk, endured the hardships, and remaining in the despised, unlivable "place of origin." A few examples: house will be paid off before kids leave elementary school; spouse has freedom to work or not work; 12 minute commute to office; surrounded by incredible natural beauty; relative job security via self-employment; top rated public school district in state. Not a SINGLE one of these "quality of life" factors could have been achieved in a lifetime of full employment in the despised place-of-origin. Is Colorado perfect? No. Is everyone here friendly/welcoming. Obviously not. Is it easy to make it here. Uh ... no. Are there times in life when logical self-interest might lead one to intelligently risk taking 2 or 3 steps back for the opportunity to take 2 or 3 giant leaps forward? Me, I say yes. Others, they say no. Good thing its still a free country and all that "...life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness..." thing hasn't been entirely strangled by the good-ole' boy mafia. I do rather enjoy this ongoing debate despite entrenched, hard-wired perspectives I don't expect will change.

The the OP, I personally believe that if you work hard, persevere, be respectful, live within your means, and don't indulge in discouraged or negative thinking, you should (eventually) be just fine wherever you end up, Colorado or elsewhere. If you are all of the above things, I hope you decide to make your stand in Colorado and I cheer you on.
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Old 10-03-2011, 01:56 PM
 
41 posts, read 223,378 times
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There's jobs out there in CO, you just have to look a little bit harder, build some connections. What type of work are you looking for? If you decide on the Fort Collins area/Northern CO, there's Hexcel, Vestas, and new Leprino plant in Greeley. These are factory type jobs, but pay pretty decently. My bro works at Hexcel, is up to making 16/hr, which isn't great but gets the job done. I also have a cousin that works in the oil fields, they pay well too, but work a ton of hours. There's also a bottle making factory in Windsor, I forget what its called though.

On your budget I wouldn't recommend living in Fort Collins, but maybe Loveland or Greeley. There are some smaller towns in the area too like Eaton, Windsor, and Millikin/Johnstown.
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Old 10-26-2011, 10:22 AM
 
1 posts, read 755 times
Reputation: 10
Southern Traveler - I thought it was interesting for me to stumble onto your post. We intend to move to CO in the summer of 2012 as well. We are currently living in TN. We also intend to make a trip to CO in March before making the move. I'm married with 2 children, ages 9 & 12. I've have been doing much research on Colorado and would love to share with you the information.
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Old 11-09-2011, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Northglenn
18 posts, read 35,076 times
Reputation: 32
Default Denver Metro

The Denver Metro area can be a very challenging place to live sometimes. It has experienced it's share of the effects of this recession. But there are people that live and grow their career every day, because they outwork the person next to them. There are plenty of suberbs in the metro area you could find suitable to live. I live work and play Colorado everyday. People in Colorado are glad the economy isn't as bad as it is in Arizona....Denver is what YOU make it.
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