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Old 11-11-2007, 03:50 PM
 
20,392 posts, read 37,969,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momzilla View Post
I saw this post back when we were considering our move, and we have finally made it. We have been here one month - well about 6 weeks actually and I already feel like I am home. We ended up in Aurora, just to rent and scout out where we are going to permanently settle. It's really nice here, so much better than Vegas. We witnessed a bit of snow (all of a day) a couple of weekends ago and quickly realized that we are not NEARLY prepared for the cold... it was nice of mother nature to give us a bit of a warning though

Already I am amazed at the overall niceness of the people here. I mean seriously driving, in stores, etc - generally the people have been nice and welcoming - even when we say we are from California. I was told before we came that our side of town on Aurora would be a dump and the people of Denver hated Californians - but I guess I was talking to some bitter people - as I have not found this to be the case at all.

It has been an amazing move and even with the cold (I have rheumatoid arthritis, so it is not pleasant at all) I think we will be here for a long time.

This place rocks

We think so too....came here from Northern VA, the DC metro area, our experiences here are just like yours.

Regarding the discouraging words you heard from a few people, were those folks in CA, or here on City-Data? Did anyone on C-D send you "direct messages" with negative comments? Thank you.

s/mike from back east
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Old 11-12-2007, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,509,305 times
Reputation: 9292
Momzilla

Like you, I'm a realtive newcomer to Colorado. Been living here in Grand Junction for just 16 months. Thus far we consider it to be a great move. ( coming from Virginia Beach ) BTW, we've never encountered the slightest bit of hostility. The ONLY place I've seen it is here on the forum from a few bitter hearted people, who haven't found a way to flow with the changes taking place. Welcome to Colorado. I think you'll enjoy living in this wonderful state.

blessings...Franco
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Old 12-04-2007, 02:04 PM
 
5 posts, read 23,715 times
Reputation: 10
Default Culture...

Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
It took a long time to get used to Colorado with its bizarre weather patterns, different culture, etc, but now I love it! We moved here from central Illinois; I grew up in W. Pennsylvania.
You mention the culture differences. I grew up in Western NY (very close to Western PA)....what are the major cultural differences you could point out? Did you find it was hard to fit in? I have heard that it can be clique-ish and hard to make new friends...thanks!
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Old 12-04-2007, 06:08 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 13,216,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ready2move? View Post
You mention the culture differences. I grew up in Western NY (very close to Western PA)....what are the major cultural differences you could point out? Did you find it was hard to fit in? I have heard that it can be clique-ish and hard to make new friends...thanks!
I grew up in Western New York, Cheetowaga. I do not think that this area is clique-ish or closed off from new comers--there are so many people here from different areas. This is big difference from WNY where most people were long term residents or decendents of the big wave of immigration from 1890-1920. Very rarely would you meet a person from the West, the South; most people were from other areas of New York or the Northeast.

I have been here close on 30 years and moved from Texas. Other big differences:

Of course the weather, this is a very dry, semi-arid area and to note Denver is on the Great Plains, not in the mountains. You will have to get used to less trees and water but the positive is less humidity and mosquitoes.

The land here is less fertile so you will not see a large diversity of truck farms, orchards, grapes, vegetables as in New York.

There is less ethnic European Diversity here but more Asians and recently more Russians. There is a large great Hispanic Community and very few African Americans.

The rural towns here are not like New York which are nice and pastoral--most of them are hard scrabbled algricultural communities.

When I was growing up near Buffalo there were many more people there than now and when I moved to Denver it was smaller then now--it is a growing area. Western New York can be characterized as very rural areas, especially if you grew up on the Southern Tier, as I surmised from your post. On the front Range with Denver, most people are packed closely within the metro area and the rural towns are not comparable to the scenic, towns with the main streets and squares of a time long ago.

So if you are looking for the real small rural towns, you may be disappointed. I am happy here because the city of Denver is very much more vibrant then the terrible decay of Buffalo. I know there is some decay and difficulties finding jobs in the rural towns of New York but there are depressed rural communities in this state. The weather is much, much better--today it is 70 degrees and I saw the weather is WNY, cold, sleet, snow , rain.

I would suggest a visit but do not expect paradise. The trick to living here is to accept the area for what it is, the land, the climate and the people. Do not bring an attitude that constantly compares this area to New York--you will be unhappy and make other people resent you. This is Colorado, not New York--Colorado has its' own beauty.

Livecontent
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Old 12-04-2007, 07:19 PM
 
Location: IN
20,264 posts, read 34,674,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ready2move? View Post
You mention the culture differences. I grew up in Western NY (very close to Western PA)....what are the major cultural differences you could point out? Did you find it was hard to fit in? I have heard that it can be clique-ish and hard to make new friends...thanks!
The analogy I would use based on some personal experiences would be that Denver has more of a "sunbelt" influenced culture whereas Western NY really is quite the opposite. Western NY and PA are still areas that have depended on industrial types of jobs typical of the rustbelt. Economic growth has not really been very strong at all in towns like Buffalo, NY and Erie, PA. Those same areas sure do get a lot of snow during the winter, though.
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Old 12-04-2007, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,136 posts, read 99,318,643 times
Reputation: 31605
Quote:
Originally Posted by ready2move? View Post
You mention the culture differences. I grew up in Western NY (very close to Western PA)....what are the major cultural differences you could point out? Did you find it was hard to fit in? I have heard that it can be clique-ish and hard to make new friends...thanks!
I don't think Denver is cliqueish. The only place I have ever heard that is on this forum. There are so many newcomers, that cliques are not a problem, IMO. Some of these differences are hard to explain, but you'll know them when you see them.

People here are not as tradition-oriented. One year, when dealing with aging parents, we had to fly out to Pittsburgh in late December. Since the best airfare deals were to be had on Christmas/New Year's Days, that is when we left and returned. The only people who felt is was sad we had to fly on Christmas Day were the Pittsburghers, young and old. Everyone out here felt that was just fine. That is just one example.

It's less dressy here. I used to work for a hospice, in the early days of my residency here. I was surprised to see people wearing jeans to funerals. People wear ski jackets with any and all attire. I have seen folks wearing jeans with business suits (when they wear business suits).

There are more chain restaurants than in W. PA.

As others have said, there are lots of newcomers. It is relatively easy to make friends. If you have kids in school, they will gladly accept you as a volunteer. I have heard that is not always the case in other places.
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Old 12-04-2007, 09:05 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 13,216,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
I don't think Denver is cliqueish. The only place I have ever heard that is on this forum. There are so many newcomers, that cliques are not a problem, IMO. Some of these differences are hard to explain, but you'll know them when you see them.

People here are not as tradition-oriented. One year, when dealing with aging parents, we had to fly out to Pittsburgh in late December. Since the best airfare deals were to be had on Christmas/New Year's Days, that is when we left and returned. The only people who felt is was sad we had to fly on Christmas Day were the Pittsburghers, young and old. Everyone out here felt that was just fine. That is just one example.

It's less dressy here. I used to work for a hospice, in the early days of my residency here. I was surprised to see people wearing jeans to funerals. People wear ski jackets with any and all attire. I have seen folks wearing jeans with business suits (when they wear business suits).

There are more chain restaurants than in W. PA.

As others have said, there are lots of newcomers. It is relatively easy to make friends. If you have kids in school, they will gladly accept you as a volunteer. I have heard that is not always the case in other places.
Nicely Said. Good observation of the jeans and ski jackets--it is so true.

Livecontent
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Old 05-07-2008, 01:48 AM
 
5 posts, read 13,811 times
Reputation: 15
Default colorado springs wants to dam the river

This has been going on as long as I have been alive. All of the major front range cities, Denver, C Springs, Aurora all want to dam our river (Arkansas) and take the water for themselves. So we have signs posted at the North end of Town saying please dont dam the arkansas..
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Old 05-07-2008, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
719 posts, read 2,314,182 times
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The rural towns here are not like New York which are nice and pastoral--most of them are hard scrabbled algricultural communities.

This is true, particularly for areas east of I25. Those hard scrabbled areas are places where a lot of the food you eat is grown, and nearly everyone is a 3rd generation native. We need these hard scrabbled agricultural communities. If you want to experience real, hard working Coloradans, look no further.

******NO FARMS. NO FOOD.******

Last edited by Sockeye; 05-07-2008 at 03:21 PM..
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Old 05-08-2008, 02:23 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 13,216,256 times
Reputation: 6913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sockeye View Post
The rural towns here are not like New York which are nice and pastoral--most of them are hard scrabbled algricultural communities.

This is true, particularly for areas east of I25. Those hard scrabbled areas are places where a lot of the food you eat is grown, and nearly everyone is a 3rd generation native. We need these hard scrabbled agricultural communities. If you want to experience real, hard working Coloradans, look no further.

******NO FARMS. NO FOOD.******
I totally agree with your statement. My words were misleading; I only meant them to point out that many towns that are made for a purpose-and that is work, as you pointed out. Many small towns in New York are also hard working agricultural towns but have had more history to develop. In addition, you see many more towns, in the east, that are now more bedroom communities, that were more, in the past, all agricultural.

I have written much on this forum that I see that the Great Plains are important part of this state and need to be stressed more in tourist literature. That is where the "real westerners" live that have generational roots, as you said in your post. Again, I say it again to newcomers, Denver is on the Great Plains, not in the mountains. The Plains have most of the population and industry in this state. Denver is the "Queen City of the Plains"; the largest city in the west and it serves as a regional center for a multi-state region--on the plains.

We in Colorado survive on the plains, the source of most of our food supplies, both planted and on the hoof. The mountains are important as they provide a catch basin for the water source that in needed in the dry plains. The moutains provide recreation, and mineral wealth which are mostly utilized by people living on the plains. However, the mountains are not the only story to be told; they are not the only amenity in this state.

You want to know and appreciate Colorado--look to the plains because most of you, who come here, will make a living; live and raise a family; die and be buried on the high arid plains of Colorado.

Livecontent

Thank You for your input,

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 05-08-2008 at 03:27 PM..
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