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Old 10-02-2011, 10:57 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 942,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sesamekid View Post
I was in Durango a couple weekends ago and was REALLY impressed.

What a beautiful, well-kept little town. The downtown was gorgeous, the neighborhoods were adorable and even the weeds were well manicured!
Before you fall in love, look around at Craigslist and see the kinds of hovels available for rent. Converted garages, miserable shacks, and total slums, for close to $1000/month. Huge homes and ranches on the auction block, right and left, because the already shaky economy is totally collapsing. That town can't support itself.

 
Old 10-03-2011, 05:36 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,298,504 times
Reputation: 6816
Quote:
Originally Posted by mizzile View Post
Before you fall in love, look around at Craigslist and see the kinds of hovels available for rent. Converted garages, miserable shacks, and total slums, for close to $1000/month. Huge homes and ranches on the auction block, right and left, because the already shaky economy is totally collapsing. That town can't support itself.
It's managed to "support itself" for the past 130 years and with a lot less outside money than it has now. You're kind of arguing against yourself by stating that landlords can get $1K for hovels. That would imply pretty strong demand unless you're arguing that those huge homeowners and ranchers are trading down.
 
Old 10-03-2011, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 318,697 times
Reputation: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by mizzile View Post
Durango is ridiculously overpriced, as has been stated before. I really, really don't get it.

I think people end up scraping by on crap jobs and rationalize the shoestring lifestyle, since everyone else (except the wealthy) do it to. It's a fun town to visit, but no place for someone with any ambition at all. However, it's easy to live there and pretend you have ambition, if that makes any sense.

The availability of seemingly affordable housing gets people to come there, but then they find out that the cheap homes are way out in the boonies, don't have potable water, and aren't as cheap as they seem once you factor in all the costs, lack of jobs, and low pay.
"Rationalizing" implies that living in one of the most fun places on earth isn't enough. Also, "ambition" is relative. While some slave their lives away, killing themselves for the ever elusive "someday", others live out our dreams in the here and now, and there is no better place to do that than Durango. Not that everyone HAS to love Durango, you'd just be crazy not to. Granted, this is probably not the best place for starting a career, but it sounds like material things might hold a higher priority in your life than they do for some of us "pretenders". I'm unapologetic about saying I'm like a kid in a candy store, here.
 
Old 10-04-2011, 08:18 AM
 
1,052 posts, read 1,578,873 times
Reputation: 1883
Quote:
Originally Posted by mizzile View Post
Before you fall in love, look around at Craigslist and see the kinds of hovels available for rent. Converted garages, miserable shacks, and total slums, for close to $1000/month. Huge homes and ranches on the auction block, right and left, because the already shaky economy is totally collapsing. That town can't support itself.
Ummm, I have checked CL and for $1,000/ mo I'm seeing some pretty nice places for rent, new condos, etc. Rents appear to be very reasonable in Durango with the highest rents being very close to or in downtown as would be expected in a tourist town. I was pleasantly surprised at how affordable the rents actually are.

I've been looking at rentals for a while now. At some point in the next few years, I intend to move to Durango & rent a house while we build our new home. I've been very pleased by what i've been seeing so I'm not sure where you're getting this from. I've been very happy with what I've been seeing i terms of rents & available houses.

What are the actual signs you're seeing of this town not being able to support itself. I don't buy it.
 
Old 10-04-2011, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,474,534 times
Reputation: 9292
mixxile wrote:
I think people end up scraping by on crap jobs and rationalize the shoestring lifestyle,
So what! There was a time in my life when I consciously CHOSE to live a shoestring lifestyle. No rationalization was required. At the time, it was my PREFFERED lifestyle. And I may choose to do it again in the near future.
 
Old 10-04-2011, 09:21 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,143,563 times
Reputation: 9066
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoButCounty View Post
What are the actual signs you're seeing of this town not being able to support itself. I don't buy it.
Much of the Durango economy, such as it is, lives on the broken dreams of people mesmerized by the "Paradise Syndrome." They move there, then over a period of years they exhaust whatever nest egg or equity they accumulated somewhere else. Once that's gone--a good chunk of it, of course, spent in the local economy--they put their tail between their legs, pack up and move "back to the world" where they can actually make an income that will sustain themselves. Then some greater fool comes along and repeats the process. This has been going on in Durango for the four-plus decades that I've been familiar with the place--especially vigorously in the last twenty years or so. So, underneath all the pretty glitter and fancy storefronts on Main Ave. there is an undercurrent of financial destruction constantly underway. That is hardly characteristic of a place that most people would consider "able to support itself." The patina of a booming economy in Durango is starting to wear thin in the recreational/tourism decline--that being especially tortured in the middle class tourism market upon which Durango remains very reliant.


About one more serious shock to the national economy, which we appear very likely to get pretty soon, and we may get a full-scale implosion of the tourism economy in places like Durango. I do know some people working in that economy in southwestern Colorado who are quietly preparing strategies of how they are going to possibly survive that business/economic downturn. The real bright spot in the southwest Colorado economy is the natural gas extraction industry--which, of course, is highly unpopular with the granola-cruncher environmentalist crowd that has flocked to Durango in the last few years. Much of the economic benefit of that industry, however, has inured to the Farmington/Aztec area in New Mexico, where most of the employment for the local natural gas extraction industry is located. As one friend of mine in La Plata County says, "La Plata County gets the wells, and Farmington gets all the jobs."
 
Old 10-04-2011, 01:32 PM
 
20,344 posts, read 37,868,858 times
Reputation: 18144
Jazz, since you joined this site 4.5 years ago, our nation has always been "one more shock" away from total collapse. At least you've stopped posting links to Kunstler's wacky website. The sky isn't falling. The sun WILL rise tomorrow. People will move to beautiful places and stay or leave just as the tides rise and fall.
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Old 10-04-2011, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,474,534 times
Reputation: 9292
MFBE wrote:
The sun WILL rise tomorrow.
It is likely to rise, but according to the local weather forecast, there is a high probability that it will be hidden behind a thick cloud cover over here in Grand Junction. If you can't see the sun, is it really there?
 
Old 10-04-2011, 02:03 PM
 
20,344 posts, read 37,868,858 times
Reputation: 18144
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
MFBE wrote:
The sun WILL rise tomorrow.
It is likely to rise, but according to the local weather forecast, there is a high probability that it will be hidden behind a thick cloud cover over here in Grand Junction. If you can't see the sun, is it really there?
If you can't see your shadow, there will be six more weeks of fall....
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Old 10-04-2011, 03:33 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,143,563 times
Reputation: 9066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Jazz, since you joined this site 4.5 years ago, our nation has always been "one more shock" away from total collapse. At least you've stopped posting links to Kunstler's wacky website. The sky isn't falling. The sun WILL rise tomorrow. People will move to beautiful places and stay or leave just as the tides rise and fall.
And exactly what trajectory has the national and Colorado economy been on over the last 4.5 years? Anyone with a functioning cerebral cortex would not call it positive. I will admit this: the near corpse that is now the US economy has proven itself far more difficult to beat to death than I ever thought possible, but that hasn't stopped the beatings it's taking every day. Even the copious injections of federal funny money--the equivalent of massive injections of adrenaline to stop a bleeding out body from slipping into terminal shock and death--has not stemmed the decline. All of that, of course, money being borrowed from the whatever productivity future generations can muster. I don't think anyone can predict the exact moment that big crash is going to occur--if I could, I would short it and become a multi-millionaire overnight--but that does not mean that it isn't coming. Only the timing is uncertain.
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