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Old 09-21-2011, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,106 posts, read 20,450,884 times
Reputation: 4148

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
In western and southern Colorado, this has been an odd summer--unusual to see even for me as a half-century studier of Colorado climate and weather patterns. High temperatures have often been normal or below, but nighttime low temperatures have been consistently higher than normal since June. Humidity has generally been higher than normal, but rainfall--especially during the Southwest Monsoon period from mid-July to late-August--has been spotty and often below normal. The Southwest Monsoon itself was nearly a month late in its onset in many areas, but has lingered for longer than normal. It has also been more spotty and capricious than normal, with some areas well-favored and others not. The fall has also been generally late coming, with the turning of the trees in the high country at least 2 weeks late in many areas and still counting. Many long-time observers of Rocky Mountain climate have opined that the period from the end of the Dust Bowl in the 1930's until the late 1990's (which is the frame of reference for most people living in this region now) was "abnormally normal" and that era is ending--with much greater variation and unpredictable climatic behavior becoming the norm in the region. We may very well be seeing that now--and it portends some very serious negative consequences in a region where overpopulation for available water resources is already a looming problem.
I can say in Pueblo it was hotter then normal both highs and lows but fall has come early as well with the heat ending right at labor day weekend. I am not sure if that is going to translate into a early snow storm for the city but I am hoping it does.

 
Old 09-21-2011, 12:19 PM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,111,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
In western and southern Colorado, this has been an odd summer--unusual to see even for me as a half-century studier of Colorado climate and weather patterns. High temperatures have often been normal or below, but nighttime low temperatures have been consistently higher than normal since June. Humidity has generally been higher than normal, but rainfall--especially during the Southwest Monsoon period from mid-July to late-August--has been spotty and often below normal. The Southwest Monsoon itself was nearly a month late in its onset in many areas, but has lingered for longer than normal. It has also been more spotty and capricious than normal, with some areas well-favored and others not. The fall has also been generally late coming, with the turning of the trees in the high country at least 2 weeks late in many areas and still counting. Many long-time observers of Rocky Mountain climate have opined that the period from the end of the Dust Bowl in the 1930's until the late 1990's (which is the frame of reference for most people living in this region now) was "abnormally normal" and that era is ending--with much greater variation and unpredictable climatic behavior becoming the norm in the region. We may very well be seeing that now--and it portends some very serious negative consequences in a region where overpopulation for available water resources is already a looming problem.
In my experiences, there were some autumns in Vail where the Aspens didn't really kick off until late Sept, where usually it gets going in early Sept.

Same back east, it's always hard to say, sometimes you can have prolonged color and it takes 2 months for all the leaves to drop, other times it can go quickly.

I don't think it really portends anything, it's just variable.
 
Old 09-21-2011, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,522,201 times
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wanneroo wrote:
I don't think it really portends anything, it's just variable.
Whatever will be will be. It is what it is!
 
Old 09-21-2011, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,106 posts, read 20,450,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Whatever will be will be. It is what it is!
Yes but for me its fun to try and predict what the weather will be like......

 
Old 09-21-2011, 04:11 PM
Status: "Merry Christmas" (set 10 hours ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,684 posts, read 11,774,454 times
Reputation: 24507
Well that's why I have my weather rock. If it's wet, it's raining; white, it's snowing; glowing red, it's hot; and gone, it's windy.
 
Old 09-21-2011, 04:23 PM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,111,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
Yes but for me its fun to try and predict what the weather will be like......

Well I think one thing we can be sure of, whether it is warm or cold this winter, dry or wet with tons of snow, it will result in economic calamity next year. Forest fires will burn specifically on the I-70 and I-25 sacrifice zones, farmers will be flooded/droughted out of existence and the warm/cold dry/wet weather will drive tourists away. It will result in austerity conditions only allowing Colorado natives that have been here over 50 years to indulge in hiking in the back country and 4x4 off roading on jeep trails. Radio stations will be purged and Jazz music will only be played 24/7 except for NPR's Great Speeches of Stalin and Lenin.
 
Old 09-21-2011, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,522,201 times
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Josseppie wrote:
Yes but for me its fun to try and predict what the weather will be like......
Unlike many others who offer their unsolicited predictions, at least you are not pawning off your predictions as the gospel truth.
 
Old 09-21-2011, 05:06 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,223,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Well I think one thing we can be sure of, whether it is warm or cold this winter, dry or wet with tons of snow, it will result in economic calamity next year. Forest fires will burn specifically on the I-70 and I-25 sacrifice zones, farmers will be flooded/droughted out of existence and the warm/cold dry/wet weather will drive tourists away. It will result in austerity conditions only allowing Colorado natives that have been here over 50 years to indulge in hiking in the back country and 4x4 off roading on jeep trails. Radio stations will be purged and Jazz music will only be played 24/7 except for NPR's Great Speeches of Stalin and Lenin.
Well, that'd all be great, except a couple of sentences--Theodore Roosevelt speeches would be more apropos; and the farmers and ranchers will be celebrating having plenty of water (no city slickers sucking it up for their lawns), great crops and high prices. Nirvana.
 
Old 09-21-2011, 05:39 PM
 
Location: The 719
13,762 posts, read 21,637,779 times
Reputation: 13358
I like Fall and hope it sticks around when it finally gets here...officially.

I don't have one of those fufu jobs where I can sit behind a desk and attend meetings, play solitaire, and look out the cubicle window all day long. I'm out in it and spent last winter's -10 deg days shoveling sidewalks and doorways. But I had my Dickie coveralls and headsox on and my work boots and gloves on and busted through it.

My water bill got up to $38.00 for July and August and my lawn and trees are enjoying this milder weather.

October 28th.
 
Old 09-21-2011, 08:25 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,871,080 times
Reputation: 2616
Wink New normal

If always variable, we should probably become accustomed to this new 'normal' in weather patterns.

It could be short memories will prevail, and that considered odd now will be considered the benchmark normal in years to come. Only those referring back to historical weather charts will realize the change.

The ambient temperature of the Earth is warmer than it was even a few decades ago, and certainly centuries. What we are experiencing now is reflective of that. In northern Colorado we received a good amount of rain early in the summer, but the typical monsoon rains had fizzled out before August arrived. But September dawned unusually damp, and only now drying out. Not 'normal,' but what in trend is likely to become it as the Earth grows ever warmer.

The first snows in the high country have arrived. Perhaps this year will witness the same generally heavy snows as last winter. Although in trend we should witness more precipitation as rain than snow, with storms less frequent, predictable, and stronger. Normal.
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