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Old 09-21-2011, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,693 posts, read 9,419,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
You need to read the post, closely:


"...I've never had enough money to travel anywhere near the area but I love mountains that look like large jagged rocks.."
I interpreted that to mean the past. As for the present, you never know about people's situations. Some people get an inheritance, win a lawsuit, etc. People find themselves in a position they never were in before.


This can be cleared up by asking the original poster: is money an issue for you in your relocation?
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Old 09-21-2011, 06:52 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,020,003 times
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Wink Necessary elbow room

A fine idea, although likely taking some work and creativity on your part to more or less accomplish.

Believe it or not it can be a trick to remove oneself a mile from the closest human in mountain Colorado, particularly if with relatively easy access to town. Others that have alluded to this are only speaking the truth. Generally speaking the most desirable and expensive real estate, if not directly in a city, is that in the mountains near it. The very locations which would allow someone to commute 30-40 minutes down the hill to their job in the metropolis. Such as, say, in the mountains west of Boulder. A desirable state of affairs to many, thus the price to do so, and precious few of them with anything like a mile of elbow room.

Frankly, on the budget of an art teacher, forget it. At least not exactly as envisioned. If one is really serious about getting out in the woods then a different career may be in order, and/or one that allows one to work from home. Additionally, with the realization that a 40 minute proximity to a halfway liberal town of sufficient size will present a sizable challenge, no matter the budget, if determined to have as few neighbors.

By my calculation a mile (at least) from the closest neighbor means a plot of land four miles square. Assuming one could find that much free land near the front range, one had better have a lot of zeros in the bank balance. More likely, in budget and also where such properties can be found, one will be looking in the remoter places of Colorado, or elsewhere. One can have the meadow, waterfall and mountain scenery veritably in their backyard, but that back 40 is likely to be a good remove from any town. And at 40 minutes more likely a town best suited for just milk and eggs, maybe a halfway decent restaurant, with anything else a good drive farther beyond.

Then also do not forget that at least a mile from the nearest anybody equates to a private driveway of at least a mile. One that will have to be plowed of snow and otherwise maintained -- by you. There might be cell phone coverage, maybe, or your bars at home might reliably always read zero. There probably will be no landline phone service to your chosen homesite, and if brought in at a cost may well at best only offer DSL speeds, and priced higher than anyone in Denver with far faster service would have a cow about. So something like satellite internet/phone/television might be your best or only option. Also, running down to the corner market for some extra milk, or anything, will be out, instead replaced by calculations of time and expense of travel and how badly you really want it. And so on, although the view and isolation may make up for all this.

If so determined, and finding some way of swinging it financially, then you might also consider places such as Alaska. A place with fabulous wilderness and mountain scenery, but surprisingly little private land available out in the woods. One option would in checking out Over The Counter land sales by the state of Alaska, wherein one actually can end up with 10 acres in the middle of nowhere for under $10,000, depending. But also know that most of these parcels are actually in some semblance of a subdivision, even if all of you may well have no road access to your lots.

This also raises another point, whether in Alaska, Colorado or elsewhere. One could perchance place themselves well out in the woods, with questionable access, and (unless really a mile from neighbors) still suffer from their presence. I'm thinking of one place well removed from the front range by state highway at first, and then a challenging enough dirt road way up the mountain. There was cabin up there (as in listed for sale at a reasonable price) from which one could realistically, with some effort, reach town in 40 minutes. But also in finding yourself hardly the only one crazy enough to live on top of a mountain, and some of these other rednecks buzzing around your home with their ATV's and half-mufflered dirt bikes. Moral of this story, if valuing serenity it doesn't matter how far out in the woods one goes, but where, and with exactly what around in what proximity. If that point not sufficiently emphasized, then know that hikers in the far beyond of Rocky Mountain National Park, perhaps contemplating how lovely a spot would be for their cabin (if allowed), may have their soliloquy rudely interrupted by one of the passing commercial jets or private planes that the NPS allows to intrude on wilderness. Check your airports and flight patterns, as well as such things as whether some mining company may suddenly appear to set up shop in your backyard.

Aside from all this, one possibility for a lot of elbow room at a fair price may be afforded by buying an island. Not an actual one, at least in Colorado. But throughout all the national forest land of the western United States there are a few such islands of private land surrounded by a whole lot more national forest. Some of these places probably command a premium, and seldom available, while others may not. In just the right spot it might be idyllic. Some downsides would probably be 40 minute access to any town only in your dreams, and likely a trek down a trail before the end of whatever dirt road your car is parked on. Also, the US Forest Service being what it is, best to check their possible plans to clear cut all the forest around you. Then also, really, make sure there are no easements or trails running through your spread, or you might spend your time running a remote restaurant for all the passing jeeps, dirt bikes, etc. making a cloud of dust through your place -- or maybe just occupied in throwing rocks at them.

Another possibility, and more nearly the practicality many settle for, is to be not exactly a mile from your neighbors, but far enough that you do not see (and preferably hear) them. Not always an easy thing to accomplish, but possible. Particularly if you do your homework. I'm thinking of the top of Hoosier Pass (elevation: 11,532 feet) and the drive from Breckenridge towards it. Breckenridge, by the way, would be that liberal and beautiful town with most daily services you might like. In driving up the road from it one begins to gain some serious altitude, and begin to reflect that surely way up here must be the high altitude nirvana they have in mind. But one can get nearly to end of Summit County and the top of the pass, and find a subdivision of all things, with some of the nondescript houses there built about as close to each other as they might be in Fort Collins. Why bother?

No, those in serious need of no excess neighbors will have to look a little harder, with more creativity. No kidding, one could be minutes from downtown Boulder and have more seclusion and privacy than something near the top of Hoosier Pass, or on top of some other mountain. It all depends, and entirely aside from price (being no small matter) the best result will be afforded in looking closely at exactly what will surround you, as in taking a 3D 360 view of it.

Thus, in circling back, an art teacher with aspirations of mountain wilderness might consider which of the smaller outlying towns in Colorado they like best. From one of them one might conceivably get far enough out of town (yet close to it) to be satisfied. This in consideration that most teachers aspiring to move to Colorado will find a difficult job market even along the front range. But it doesn't hurt to dream, and all the more realistically if focused on a rural area where one might actually in time get a job, somehow.

Just know that the mountains of northern Colorado not the same as down south, not in weather or the exact minerals to be found either. That this different from the mountains of northwest Wyoming, which at least in lack of population compared to Colorado could also offer possibilities. Or even in over-crowded California, if on the far side of the Sierra Nevada where remote the best beginning of an address, and snow is measured in feet on the ground, or how high above the door.

Not all the same, and it will take some looking, and contemplation of what the ideal is really constituted of.
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Old 09-21-2011, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,390 posts, read 17,311,940 times
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You can have it all at a very affordable price. Get yourself a light-weight pack tent, a good backpack, a pair of quality hiking boots, some trail maps, and head off for the wilderness areas.
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Old 09-22-2011, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Canon City, Colorado
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Wannaroo,...you are too funny!! "the thought of living in a place so remote gave my mom an emotional breakdown!!" ...you're hysterical!!!
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Old 09-22-2011, 02:25 PM
 
27 posts, read 60,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
I interpreted that to mean the past. As for the present, you never know about people's situations. Some people get an inheritance, win a lawsuit, etc. People find themselves in a position they never were in before.


This can be cleared up by asking the original poster: is money an issue for you in your relocation?
yes and no...I'm practically putting my entire pay this year towards this relocation. Another thing I mentioned in my first post is my openness/interest in a more manual occupation once in my new location.

If I find an area that has jobs available within a feasible proximity and the type of dream homes/views I desire but I can't afford it yet I'll rent or buy a place within that area and settle in to the permanent community and job I want while I continue saving up towards having my ideal view in my backyard instead of just close by.

Last edited by gemcraver; 09-22-2011 at 03:48 PM..
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Old 09-23-2011, 07:29 AM
 
79 posts, read 254,655 times
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What about something on Hastings Mesa, Wilson Mesa, Horsefly Mesa near Ridgway, CO? You can get a cabin/home on 5+ acres with gorgeous views for far less than 1 million. The hospital in Montrose is 35 miles away. Ouray, Ridgway, Montrose & Telluride all have school districts.
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Old 09-23-2011, 08:26 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,780,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShellKing View Post
What about something on Hastings Mesa, Wilson Mesa, Horsefly Mesa near Ridgway, CO? You can get a cabin/home on 5+ acres with gorgeous views for far less than 1 million. The hospital in Montrose is 35 miles away. Ouray, Ridgway, Montrose & Telluride all have school districts.
Most teachers I know don't have a million dollars lying around and they sure couldn't afford the mortgage on a million dollar property--that is, unless they are a trustifarian with a big inheritance or a sugardaddy. Only a trustifarian or someone from outside of Colorado would consider a million dollar property "affordable" to someone in the working middle class living in Colorado and expecting to make a living in the local rural Colorado economy--an economy where a $10/hr. job is considered "good paying."
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Old 09-23-2011, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,693 posts, read 9,419,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Believe it or not it can be a trick to remove oneself a mile from the closest human in mountain Colorado, particularly if with relatively easy access to town.
Nope. You can get a pretty solitary hiking experience even close to Denver. The reason for this is that many people who "go hiking" are not serious about it, they are on the trail only for a mile or two before getting bored and returning. This is especially truly for people who pull up to campgrounds in their RVs. Once you hike past their 'outer limit', so to speak, the number of people on the trail really thins out. There's plenty of places to hike where you won't see anybody for two or three hours (or more).

Quote:
Generally speaking the most desirable and expensive real estate, if not directly in a city, is that in the mountains near it. The very locations which would allow someone to commute 30-40 minutes down the hill to their job in the metropolis.
Absolutely true.
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Old 09-23-2011, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,693 posts, read 9,419,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemcraver View Post
yes and no...I'm practically putting my entire pay this year towards this relocation.
So, the answer is "yes" money is an issue for you to relocate to Colorado. Your year's pay is probably $50k. Sadly, this won't buy any sort of property anywhere in the mountains. In many cases it won't even buy an acre of land. (Read: an acre in the mountains near Littleton sells for $200,000 and that's without a house). I hate to have to tell you that. I totally sympathize with your dream.

Now if you're willing to rent, then it's entirely doable. Many people on a shoestring budget who want to live the Colorado dream have done it and continue to do it: students, wanderers, artists, ski bums, etc.

But you have to realize that if you are working a normal job with a normal salary, you may never be able to save up enough to buy the kind of place you want. Those type of places are usually upwards of $1 million dollars.

It sucks. I wish it wasn't like that, but that's how it is.

Things get cheaper the farther north you go (Wyoming, Idaho), so you may want to consider other states. But winters get harsher as well.
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Old 09-23-2011, 05:17 PM
 
79 posts, read 254,655 times
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Let me repost and be more specific with my numbers (since saying FAR LESS than a million wasn't clear enough):

What about something on Hastings Mesa, Wilson Mesa, Horsefly Mesa near Ridgway, CO? You can get a cabin/home on 5+ acres with gorgeous views for $205,000. The hospital in Montrose is 35 miles away. Ouray, Ridgway, Montrose & Telluride all have school districts.
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