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Old 09-29-2011, 11:00 PM
 
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Of course not. That's a lot of snow and a major hassle. Do you take joy from others' hardship?
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Old 09-30-2011, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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This question is proof positive (tongue in cheek) that the rest of the nation thinks we are buried in snow for most of the year.
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Old 09-30-2011, 07:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
This question is proof positive (tongue in cheek) that the rest of the nation thinks we are buried in snow for most of the year.
No, that's Wyoming in a good year. ROFL
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Old 09-30-2011, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Virginia
65 posts, read 178,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by formercalifornian View Post
Of course not. That's a lot of snow and a major hassle. Do you take joy from others' hardship?
No I don't I was just asking.
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Old 09-30-2011, 09:55 PM
 
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Wink Several flavors of snow

Well, I found it interesting, as well as understanding how such storms can impact major cities.

I doubt many in Colorado had a sense of Schadenfreude, although perhaps bemusement. Particularly in the mountains here, where it does tend to snow a bit, life may be more adapted to dealing with such things. Indeed, if out in a storm, I'd rather be up in the mountains where driving on snow is a matter of course, than on I-25 or otherwise in the city where the snow melts off to dry more readily between storms.

Generalizations being what they are, it is worth noting that a mountain town such as Estes Park does not receive all that much snow. The high peaks just west in Rocky Mountain National Park certainly do, but they act to put Estes Park and some nearby environs in a rain shadow of sorts. So there can be some snow about, and perhaps even driving on it, but adventures with serious blizzards there are best found on the evening news, of somewhere else. Even the major December snow storm of several winters ago that shut down DIA for several days was most notable in Estes Park for halting some of the deliveries from the front range to the grocery store, but getting to the store from town was no problem. If looked for, there was maybe two feet of snow on the ground from that storm, and that a notable rarity. At least of late, although historical pictures reflect higher amounts. Estes Park resides at an elevation of about 7,500 feet, with some Colorado towns elsewhere in the state, at even higher elevations, receiving the same relative paucity of snow. But of course it can really snow in places, and does.

But if notable in folklore for snowfall, when it comes to serious accumulations Colorado is something of an impostor. Visit much of the Sierra Nevada of California in winter to discover why. If certainly some heavy snowfalls in certain places as a matter of course, snow on the ground in Colorado is more often measured in inches in many locals. In the Sierra Nevada mountains it is measured in feet. Often as in how high is your front door, and is the snow higher than the top of it.

This phenomenon extends right up the West Coast to the Cascade Mountains of Oregon and Washington. They routinely receive a lot of snow just east of Seattle, such as on Snoqualmie Pass. Skiers like it, if used to the common wet and heavy snow from Pacific influences. But on the infrequent occasions when the usual misty rain turns to snow in Seattle proper, even a few inches of it, then one would think they had been beset by an Eastern blizzard. Local news crews go into overdrive with hyperbole, a good many become stuck on the roads, and the town nearly freezes -- until everything melts the next day.
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Old 10-02-2011, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Laughing? Oh yes...but not at east coasters...at the news media, who seems to have a talent for turning a rough situation into THE END OF EXISTENCE AS WE KNOW IT!

Seriously. Why not just give people the facts, calmly and objectively, and maybe even some real information they could use before being buried in 36" of snow? Instead of, say, TELLING THEM HOW THEY COULD BE BURIED FOR A HORRIFICALLY INDETERMINATE PERIOD OF TIME AND THEY BETTER HAVE SLED DOGS AND RIFLES AND ENOUGH FOOD AND WATER FOR A YEAR CUZ THE END IS A-COMIN!

Alright...maybe the media wasn't that bad, but they always SEEM that bad.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Parker, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zenkonami View Post
Laughing? Oh yes...but not at east coasters...at the news media, who seems to have a talent for turning a rough situation into THE END OF EXISTENCE AS WE KNOW IT!

Seriously. Why not just give people the facts, calmly and objectively, and maybe even some real information they could use before being buried in 36" of snow? Instead of, say, TELLING THEM HOW THEY COULD BE BURIED FOR A HORRIFICALLY INDETERMINATE PERIOD OF TIME AND THEY BETTER HAVE SLED DOGS AND RIFLES AND ENOUGH FOOD AND WATER FOR A YEAR CUZ THE END IS A-COMIN!

Alright...maybe the media wasn't that bad, but they always SEEM that bad.
I think the media was about that bad. I remember the Weather Channel being especially dramatic about the whole thing... they were calling the storm "Snowmageddon." I realize that a major snow storm hitting the heavily populated east coast is a big deal, but they WAY over did it. The media has become so dramatic: way more than they used to be.
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Old 10-03-2011, 10:12 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southerngirl1989 View Post
Im just curious because I had a feeling that people who have experienced more snow were probably laughing at VA from that blizzard
That has always been an issue to me - that someone from a real snow belt would laugh at all the fuss they make on the East Coast about snow. I was visting Denver (one of my favorate cities in the USA) and told someone we use a snowblower to clear 4 inches of snow - they laughed like I was crazy. To be fair however, you have to understand there are two issues with East Coast snow: marketing and reality.

The climatic reality is that the rare times that a big blizzard drops 15 - 24 inches of snow on NYC, Philly, Baltimore, Washington, DC, Richmond, VA…etc it is a “big deal” and rather rare (the media still hypes it out of proportion, however). Keep in mind that the big cities on the East Coast average less than half the annual snowfall of Denver: Denver averages 52 inches of snow each winter….all of the big cities average less than 25 inches. Here is a map of average annual snowfall in the USA. As you can see most of the East Coast from NYC southward only average 24 inches a year or less (and parts of southeastern Virginia and southern Maryland average less than 12 inches a year)…while a large chuck of Colorado average more than 48 inches:



However "snow hype" is much more marketable…and the East Coast is the biggest media market in North America (100 million + people). There was an actually a writer for the Baltimore Sun some years back who wrote a hilarious piece about how they (the media and local weathercasters) hype snow, or even the threat of snow, on the East Coast out of proportion. As a transplanted Midwestern (from Duluth, MN) he found great mirth in how much attention snow gets on the East Coast, yet many areas of the USA get 100 to 300 inches a year and there is no mention of it

Marketing is still the biggest business out there
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Old 10-03-2011, 10:18 AM
 
16,165 posts, read 20,172,692 times
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Speaking of 36 inches of snow, that storm reminded me about a different type of storm and in my opinion was worse-much worse. It's known by long time Colorado residents as the "Blizzard of '82."

A massive low pressure with clockwise winds joined up and sat right over Denver on Christmas Eve 1982. It snowed for a day and a half. It was a mess and a half because for weeks afterward we went into a deep freeze and the side streets were almost impassible. The Denver television stations appealed to the viewers for help as people couldn't get to the hospital and the nurses couldn't get out for their outpatient duty. I did volunteer duty for a few days as I was on furlough at the time when I was working at the Ft. St. Vrain Plant. One of the things I remember also is the report of severe thunderstorms over western Kansas and the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles. And a couple tornadoes were reported in those areas. Imagine, tornadoes on Christmas Eve. SHEESH!

What I remember most was a metro area just paralyzed. And for a few years afterward I saw bumper stickers on peoples cars- "I survived the blizzard of '82."

And it was costly in other ways besides the financial layout to hire subcontractors to get dump trucks out for snow removal as the city drivers were overwhelmed to say the least. It eventually cost mayor Bill McNichols his job as he lost the mayor election to Federico Pena. The streets were a mess for weeks and the people lit up KOA, KHOW, and the other talk stations with complaints. And they made their impact at the ballot box.

The storm ranged from 2 to 4 feet. The ironic thing was I remember Ft. Collins and Greely only getting maybe a couple inches out of this. Fortunately I was able to motor around ok with my '77 Dodge 4 wheel drive, which I still have. Between volunteer work with a couple area hospitals and my neighbors, I stayed plenty busy. It was a storm and a half!

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 10-03-2011 at 02:47 PM..
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Old 10-03-2011, 02:24 PM
 
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The ironic thing about the Blizzard of '82 was that it was very localized event--predominantly affecting only the immediate Denver area. As DoubleH noted, just a few miles in any direction from Denver and the storm's impact was relatively minimal. It affected the mountains very little and the Western Slope not at all.

Much more dramatic statewide as far as huge winter impacts was the "Arctic Blast" in February 1989. I was traveling across the state the day that hit. I had every weather condition from sunny skies, to a savage snowstorm on Monarch Pass, to driving alternately in temperatures from 35° above zero to 15° below zero within less than 15 miles and bouncing back and forth in those temperatures several times in 120 miles. The next morning in Denver it was 25° below zero and snowing so hard one couldn't see. I canceled my business in Denver and started back to the Western Slope. Driving conditions were about as horrible as I've seen in Colorado. After a dreadful drive from Denver to Glenwood Springs on I-70, from Glenwood Springs to Rifle was a horrific blizzard with several inches of snow on the road, no visibility (driving at 15 mph or less from delineator post to delineator post), and savage chill factors. I got the last motel room in Rifle, as I-70 was closed from there to Grand Junction within 15 minutes of my arrival in Rifle, with hundreds of people winding up sleeping on the floor of the DeBeque CDOT garage after their vehicles became stuck in that vicinity. The next morning when CDOT got the road open, I counted over 200 vehicles stuck between Rifle and Grand Junction. The Blizzard of '82 got all the publicity because of its affect on Denver, but the Arctic Blast of '89 was a much more severe winter weather event.
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