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Old 10-03-2011, 02:38 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,017,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBLE H View Post
Speaking of 36 inches of snow, that storm reminded me about a different type of storm and in my opinion was worse-much worse. It's known by long time Colorado residents as the "Blizzard of '82."

A massive low pressure with clockwise winds joined up and sat right over Denver on Christmas Eve 1982. It snowed for a day and a half. It was a mess and a half because for weeks afterward we went into a deep freeze and the side streets were almost impassible. The Denver television stations appealed to the viewers for help as people couldn't get to the hospital and the nurses couldn't get out for their outpatient duty. I did volunteer duty for a few days as I was on furlough at the time when I was working at the Ft. St. Vrain Plant. One of the things I remember also is the report of severe thunderstorms over western Kansas and the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles. And a couple tornadoes were reported in those areas. Imagine, tornadoes on Christmas Eve. SHEESH!

What I remember most was a metro area just paralyzed. And for a few years afterward I saw bumper stickers on peoples cars- "I survived the blizzard of '82."
I still have some memories of that storm and being stuck in Denver for a while as we had only planned to be in Denver for a few days over Christmas with relatives. I can remember all the snow coming down.

As I recall, we didn't take I-25 home but headed east to Kansas and then south from there. I remember it being clear when we left but getting caught in wild wind gusts in Kansas.
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Old 10-03-2011, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 318,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
Ya Pueblo never gets that much snow. Once we got 2 feet when I was a kid and the schools were shut down for 2 days.
I realize Coloradoans simply have more experience dealing with the snow but I'm amazed how adept you are. Two feet of snow in Kentucky="see ya' in two weeks, kids."
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Old 10-03-2011, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,348,297 times
Reputation: 4131
Quote:
Originally Posted by VenusAllen View Post
I realize Coloradoans simply have more experience dealing with the snow but I'm amazed how adept you are. Two feet of snow in Kentucky="see ya' in two weeks, kids."
If Orlando Florida got snow they would be shut down, even if it was just a inch, but the OP asked about VA where they did get more snow then Pueblo has. That is why I posted that.
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Old 10-04-2011, 12:23 PM
 
29 posts, read 42,344 times
Reputation: 22
No, we weren't laughing at the NE, we commiserated having dealt with much worse ourselves. We may chuckle at how ill-prepared local government is in dealing with severe weather (which we've experienced ourselves here also), but we don't take any pleasure from the hardships you all suffered with last winter's storms.
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Virginia
65 posts, read 178,889 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by VenusAllen View Post
I realize Coloradoans simply have more experience dealing with the snow but I'm amazed how adept you are. Two feet of snow in Kentucky="see ya' in two weeks, kids."
that was the second blizzard we had and Schools closed for 2 weeks aswell. not to mention flights were grounded.
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Old 10-12-2011, 03:01 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,864 posts, read 7,096,377 times
Reputation: 1543
I laugh at people in COLORADO when they think snow is a big deal. I grew up in the snow belt of north east Ohio. You'll never see snow like that in your lifetime. I remember some days going out to go to work and couldn't find my truck. One year we got 55" in 24 hours. They had to call out the National Guard to plow the roads with tanks, cause the plows couldn't even do it.
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Old 10-12-2011, 03:05 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,864 posts, read 7,096,377 times
Reputation: 1543
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBLE H View Post
Speaking of 36 inches of snow, that storm reminded me about a different type of storm and in my opinion was worse-much worse. It's known by long time Colorado residents as the "Blizzard of '82."

A massive low pressure with clockwise winds joined up and sat right over Denver on Christmas Eve 1982. It snowed for a day and a half. It was a mess and a half because for weeks afterward we went into a deep freeze and the side streets were almost impassible. The Denver television stations appealed to the viewers for help as people couldn't get to the hospital and the nurses couldn't get out for their outpatient duty. I did volunteer duty for a few days as I was on furlough at the time when I was working at the Ft. St. Vrain Plant. One of the things I remember also is the report of severe thunderstorms over western Kansas and the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles. And a couple tornadoes were reported in those areas. Imagine, tornadoes on Christmas Eve. SHEESH!

What I remember most was a metro area just paralyzed. And for a few years afterward I saw bumper stickers on peoples cars- "I survived the blizzard of '82."

And it was costly in other ways besides the financial layout to hire subcontractors to get dump trucks out for snow removal as the city drivers were overwhelmed to say the least. It eventually cost mayor Bill McNichols his job as he lost the mayor election to Federico Pena. The streets were a mess for weeks and the people lit up KOA, KHOW, and the other talk stations with complaints. And they made their impact at the ballot box.

The storm ranged from 2 to 4 feet. The ironic thing was I remember Ft. Collins and Greely only getting maybe a couple inches out of this. Fortunately I was able to motor around ok with my '77 Dodge 4 wheel drive, which I still have. Between volunteer work with a couple area hospitals and my neighbors, I stayed plenty busy. It was a storm and a half!
I remember that vividly, although I was only 5 at the time.
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