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Old 10-02-2011, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Colorado
1,706 posts, read 2,921,379 times
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Great article in the Colorado Springs Gazette this morning.

State-supported online schools failing students, data show | online, students, schools - Colorado Springs Gazette, CO
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Old 10-02-2011, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,885 posts, read 8,860,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by captain_hug99 View Post
Ultimately, there's nothing that can replace human interaction in school. Interaction with teachers. Interaction with other students.

I fear online schooling and even homeschooling is going to bring us more Sheldon Coopers.
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Old 10-02-2011, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
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Don't knock it too much. On-line learning is what will bring down the cost of a college education. The future is lower division online lectures that previously would have been done in giant auditoriums followed up with locally run labs and break-out sessions. Upper division courses will be done via Skype type video teleconferencing. Universities from all over the world will then be forced to compete for students without enjoying the natural monopoly of location. It will probably get to the point where the learning is free and revenue will be generated via advertising run prior to the courses. What you see happening now with the news business will soon be the reality for the higher education business.
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Old 10-02-2011, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,706 posts, read 2,921,379 times
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University is VASTLY different than K-12 learning. And K-8 learning is definitely different than taking upper level courses in high school.

I am not knocking online learning for all levels, just some levels. If you read the article, they are concentrating on Online Elementary, Middle, and high schools, they aren't even mentioning online colleges.
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Old 10-02-2011, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,885 posts, read 8,860,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Don't knock it too much. On-line learning is what will bring down the cost of a college education. The future is lower division online lectures that previously would have been done in giant auditoriums followed up with locally run labs and break-out sessions. Upper division courses will be done via Skype type video teleconferencing. Universities from all over the world will then be forced to compete for students without enjoying the natural monopoly of location. It will probably get to the point where the learning is free and revenue will be generated via advertising run prior to the courses. What you see happening now with the news business will soon be the reality for the higher education business.
I'm only knocking what I've already seen fail. Our school could not support a Latin curriculum due to low numbers...and incidentally, we were a gifted school. So the parents of a handful of students who did want to take Latin urged us to try the state's online Latin program. Virtually every student dropped it and parents hated it. The general conclusion was that nothing substitutes for teacher/student contact.

College level is one thing. College students are adults...sort of. Middle schoolers are not.

And by the way, cheap does not usually equal good.

Last edited by Mike from back east; 10-02-2011 at 08:01 PM..
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Old 10-02-2011, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
And by the way, cheap does not usually equal good.
Paying $100K+ for a college degree isn't so good either. Fortunately I doubt it will cost anywhere near that over the next few years as technology and competition make a university course no more expensive than a music or movie download. You will likely see a lot fewer instructors. I think the failings you see with offering it to younger students will subside as on-line education becomes more sophisticated. Right now it's at the equivalent of "pong" level.
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Old 10-03-2011, 02:43 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,510,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
And by the way, cheap does not usually equal good.
In the US, expensive doesn't necessarily mean good. Especially education and health care.
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Old 10-03-2011, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Fort Collins, CO
166 posts, read 357,760 times
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We moved to CO 10 months ago with a college freshman. At least online college courses make resident status a non-issue. Otherwise we would be paying 400+ per credit hour for community college! (he did take one on-campus course per semester to get out and meet some people his age, etc.) the online courses are not very challenging and seem to focus on just making sure they log in and blog every day. Ah well.. general Ed... We will be residents for winter term.
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Centennial State
399 posts, read 666,868 times
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Not everyone learns the same way. Some children learn better visually as some learn better verbally and kinesthetically. This is the same for adults. Just because online schooling doesn't work for a certain group of students doesn't mean it's a bad system. Just like the schooling system we already have in the U.S. Not every child learns the same way that the teachers teach in. That applies to online schooling. Some online courses are cheap and obviously need to be looked at those who understand how people learn online. Others are very well programmed and designed. Aleks, a math online learning website, is a very intuitive and helpful online math class. However not everyone learns math as effectively as others when learning online compared to most people sitting in a classroom learning by repetition.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,885 posts, read 8,860,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
In the US, expensive doesn't necessarily mean good. Especially education and health care.
I never said it did.
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