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Old 02-03-2012, 08:58 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
Reputation: 9065

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jspyder136 View Post
Thanks for your input.
I've been thinking of upping my budget to get what I want.
I simply want land for the privacy and the "isolation" feel of it. I do plan of gating the property to ensure privacy. So if it isn't really treed, that wouldn't bother me. And I don't mind not having views also.
But finding the perfect home is kinda difficult. Maybe I'm to picky.
II have seen land ranging from 40 to 80 acres around $100K –– $300K. It is in the middle of nowhere in rural RURAL open country Colorado. Places I never heard of. I mean beyond secluded, and pretty near isolated!!
I am seriously considering buying the land, fencing and/or gating the perimeter of the property and building a contemporary home. I've talked to some people and building a 4,000 sq. ft. to 7,000 sq. ft. could be doable if I decided to shell out the dough.
The purpose of this is that I intend in building a "miniature" family compound.
But I don't want a place that seems rural but is actually 40 minutes from Denver. I want isolated, and would most likely be used during March to October. (Live in Arizona during the cold months.)


But right now, my plan is to buy cheap isolated land under $300,000 with 40 to 80 acres and just develop it.

Hope we both find what we are looking.
Quite bluntly, you are describing the type of person that most long-time rural Coloradans DON'T want living near them. Trophy houses built in the middle of nowhere that stick out like a sore thumb, occupied by cocky out-of-staters with little knowledge of what it's like to live in a rural area, and people with their "compunds" that they don't even have the gumption to occupy year-round. I've been around that type, and they make lousy neighbors in a rural area.

 
Old 02-03-2012, 09:45 PM
 
Location: United States of America
208 posts, read 681,667 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Quite bluntly, you are describing the type of person that most long-time rural Coloradans DON'T want living near them. Trophy houses built in the middle of nowhere that stick out like a sore thumb, occupied by cocky out-of-staters with little knowledge of what it's like to live in a rural area, and people with their "compunds" that they don't even have the gumption to occupy year-round. I've been around that type, and they make lousy neighbors in a rural area.
Well to bad for you.
Because I can afford it and I think that lifestyle would be great for me and my family.

Sucks to be you then.

And I'd like to think I'm a great neighbor and if my house is surrounded by 80+ acres that I own what would that matter to you?? You're not even going to see my house. What the heck are you talking about "living near them"???

If you don't like it then buy all the land for sale in Colorado and turn it into a National Park.

Yeah.........didn't think so.
 
Old 02-04-2012, 08:56 AM
 
2,420 posts, read 3,261,321 times
Reputation: 4823
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:45 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by jspyder136 View Post
Well to bad for you.
Because I can afford it and I think that lifestyle would be great for me and my family.

Sucks to be you then.

And I'd like to think I'm a great neighbor and if my house is surrounded by 80+ acres that I own what would that matter to you?? You're not even going to see my house. What the heck are you talking about "living near them"???

If you don't like it then buy all the land for sale in Colorado and turn it into a National Park.

Yeah.........didn't think so.
Yup, just the attitude I'm talking about: "I'm going to move in and do as I damned well please, and the hell with you." That attitude may work in big metro areas where people don't know their neighbors, don't care about them, and don't think that they need them--but it will assure you a life of misery in rural Colorado. Why? Because your neighbors WILL know you and they WILL know what kind of attitude you have. And, they have long memories about how you treat them. People with your attitude usually don't last in rural Colorado because they get exactly what they ask for: to be isolated from everything and everybody. But life here doesn't work that way, and sooner or later you will need those neighbors who have lived here for generations that you've treated so badly with your condescending, arrogant attitude.

You also show your ignorance of Colorado. One can easily see one's neighbors on 80 acres. Hell, I could see my neighbor's place when I lived on 2,000 acres--and it was 3 miles away! I considered that a "close-by" neighbor. That's the difference between real rural Coloradans and the "posers."
 
Old 02-04-2012, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Pueblo West
21 posts, read 48,710 times
Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Yup, just the attitude I'm talking about: "I'm going to move in and do as I damned well please, and the hell with you." That attitude may work in big metro areas where people don't know their neighbors, don't care about them, and don't think that they need them--but it will assure you a life of misery in rural Colorado. Why? Because your neighbors WILL know you and they WILL know what kind of attitude you have. And, they have long memories about how you treat them. People with your attitude usually don't last in rural Colorado because they get exactly what they ask for: to be isolated from everything and everybody. But life here doesn't work that way, and sooner or later you will need those neighbors who have lived here for generations that you've treated so badly with your condescending, arrogant attitude.

You also show your ignorance of Colorado. One can easily see one's neighbors on 80 acres. Hell, I could see my neighbor's place when I lived on 2,000 acres--and it was 3 miles away! I considered that a "close-by" neighbor. That's the difference between real rural Coloradans and the "posers."
Well said, Jazz. I totally concur. A person with that kind of attitude will almost certainly be ostracized by everyone in the surrounding area. And when he needs their help in times of need, his pleas will fall on deaf ears. Like they say: What goes around, comes around.
 
Old 02-04-2012, 03:59 PM
 
Location: United States of America
208 posts, read 681,667 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Yup, just the attitude I'm talking about: "I'm going to move in and do as I damned well please, and the hell with you." That attitude may work in big metro areas where people don't know their neighbors, don't care about them, and don't think that they need them--but it will assure you a life of misery in rural Colorado. Why? Because your neighbors WILL know you and they WILL know what kind of attitude you have. And, they have long memories about how you treat them. People with your attitude usually don't last in rural Colorado because they get exactly what they ask for: to be isolated from everything and everybody. But life here doesn't work that way, and sooner or later you will need those neighbors who have lived here for generations that you've treated so badly with your condescending, arrogant attitude.

You also show your ignorance of Colorado. One can easily see one's neighbors on 80 acres. Hell, I could see my neighbor's place when I lived on 2,000 acres--and it was 3 miles away! I considered that a "close-by" neighbor. That's the difference between real rural Coloradans and the "posers."
you speak for yourself.

FACEPALM...
 
Old 02-04-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Southeastern Colorado
319 posts, read 619,917 times
Reputation: 439
Might I chime in with a softer, gentler voice?

Jazzlover and Ryker49 are not far off the mark.

Private property rights being what they are, anyone is of course welcome to build the house of his/her dreams on the land of his/her dreams. There is, however, a code in the culture of the rural West that goes something like this:

I may not like you or agree with your politics or your lifestyle, and I may never set foot in your home or you in mine and we may never share a meal, but if we can co-exist peaceably, I will keep an eye out for your interests and you for mine. And when one of us needs help in the middle of the night because our home or our barn is on fire and the fire department can't get here fast enough; or Grandpa has fallen and can't get up and a strong back is needed; or if somebody needs something that money can't buy, we can agree to be there to "neighbor" for each other.

It may sound like a corny cliche, but it's one of the most precious qualities of living rural. Isolationism and privacy indeed have their place and time, but when things get rough, one may wish one had come out of the gate long enough to foster some neighborly relationships. Especially if one is absent for nearly half the year.

Not telling you how to live your life. Just suggesting that you take some time to learn about and understand how your neighbors might be living theirs.
 
Old 02-05-2012, 03:18 AM
 
Location: United States of America
208 posts, read 681,667 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by bovinedivine View Post
Might I chime in with a softer, gentler voice?

Jazzlover and Ryker49 are not far off the mark.

Private property rights being what they are, anyone is of course welcome to build the house of his/her dreams on the land of his/her dreams. There is, however, a code in the culture of the rural West that goes something like this:

I may not like you or agree with your politics or your lifestyle, and I may never set foot in your home or you in mine and we may never share a meal, but if we can co-exist peaceably, I will keep an eye out for your interests and you for mine. And when one of us needs help in the middle of the night because our home or our barn is on fire and the fire department can't get here fast enough; or Grandpa has fallen and can't get up and a strong back is needed; or if somebody needs something that money can't buy, we can agree to be there to "neighbor" for each other.

It may sound like a corny cliche, but it's one of the most precious qualities of living rural. Isolationism and privacy indeed have their place and time, but when things get rough, one may wish one had come out of the gate long enough to foster some neighborly relationships. Especially if one is absent for nearly half the year.

Not telling you how to live your life. Just suggesting that you take some time to learn about and understand how your neighbors might be living theirs.


I'm looking to take a break from society in Colorado. If I want to be social with the neighbors, that's what my life in New York and Miami is for.
Got loads of friends in those parts that I would be inviting when I make the move to the West.
I'm going from the airport to my house.
Don't worry sensitive Coloradans, no one is going to bother you or your way of life. You do know its 2012 and everyone pretty much acts the same wherever you go because of the interent and globalization.
You guys aren't that unique.
Gosh, if I knew people like you were there, makes me want to look into Utah or Wyoming.

Overly sensitive much?
 
Old 02-05-2012, 11:16 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by jspyder136 View Post
I'm looking to take a break from society in Colorado. If I want to be social with the neighbors, that's what my life in New York and Miami is for.
Got loads of friends in those parts that I would be inviting when I make the move to the West.
I'm going from the airport to my house.
Don't worry sensitive Coloradans, no one is going to bother you or your way of life. You do know its 2012 and everyone pretty much acts the same wherever you go because of the interent and globalization.
You guys aren't that unique.
Gosh, if I knew people like you were there, makes me want to look into Utah or Wyoming.

Overly sensitive much?
If you think that you can be a hermit in Colorado and not have a relationship with your neighbors, you are sadly mistaken. In rural Colorado, you need to be able to know and get along with your neighbors. You have some idealized view of what your life will be here that is completely disconnected from truth. Apparently bovinedevine's "gentler" post still doesn't make you "get it."

And, if you think that rural Coloradans are tough to get along with when you have an attitude like yours, you will find the rural areas of Utah, New Mexico, Wyoming, and Montana even more unforgiving of your attitude. The rural areas of all of those states are less accepting of outsiders, especially the ones that act like jerks, than is rural Colorado. I know--I've lived in Wyoming, for one, and I've spent decades doing business and traveling in rural New Mexico and Utah.

All your posts are doing is re-enforcing the stereotype of the "obnoxious know-it-all Easterner" that Westerners want to have nothing to do with. I have friends on the East Coast and I know not all people from that region fit the "obnoxious" stereotype--but it sure as hell seems that a lot of obnoxious ones want to move to Colorado.
 
Old 02-05-2012, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,899,377 times
Reputation: 2435
Quote:
Originally Posted by jspyder136 View Post
I'm looking to take a break from society in Colorado.
Colorado is a good place for that. You might also consider Wyoming and Idaho which would cheaper and less people, if that's what you want.
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