U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 10-21-2011, 11:51 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,841,779 times
Reputation: 2615

Advertisements

In the event you take the unfortunate step of tampering with that poor tree, rather than protecting it, then know that not all arborists are created equal.

I've dealt with some, one crew who had just finished cutting off a small limb from one of the aspen trees in this yard before I arrived to intervene. They claimed it posed a risk to power lines, which it in no way did. I told them to get the hell out. These are the same guys who cut down perfectly live and healthy trees elsewhere for no good reason. Guys whose standard practice is often to lop off the top of trees when one or two small branches might have done. What they basically are are hired guns with chainsaws who do as they are told. They will also tell you they are arborists.

A real arborist I consulted with came out from Colorado State University. In this case because insects were boring into some aspen, and my concern. She had some ideas, but could not provide any ready solutions. Perhaps some other expert would have had a better idea; not all professionals are created equal. But she actually had schooling, came from a department devoted to such things, and wasn't carrying a chainsaw.

You'll have to decide at last how much you care for this tree, and willing to stand up for its interests. But if dealing with arborists, know the difference.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2011, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,958 posts, read 8,893,958 times
Reputation: 18330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
I've dealt with some, one crew who had just finished cutting off a small limb from one of the aspen trees in this yard before I arrived to intervene. They claimed it posed a risk to power lines, which it in no way did. I told them to get the hell out.
Good for you, Idunn. Reminds me of my grandmother years ago. The state decided to cut down 4 huge maples along our NYS state highway 21...right in front of our house, because they were too close to the road. So, my grandmother went out and measured the distance of all the fire hydrants in the area to the road, found they were closer than the trees, so the state crews relented.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2011, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,409 posts, read 2,255,988 times
Reputation: 1691
I'm wondering how much of this tree has been damaged by the wet snowstorm we just got (assuming the OP's town was hit by the storm). The Colorado climate (particularly along the northern Front Range) tends to be rough on trees that are native to places where it doesn't snow during "leaf-out".

Last edited by xeric; 10-26-2011 at 10:27 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2011, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Colorado
486 posts, read 1,236,132 times
Reputation: 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by xeric View Post
I'm wondering how much of this tree has been damaged by the wet snowstorm we just got (assuming the OP's town was hit by the storm). The Colorado climate (particularly along the northern Front Range) tends to be rough on trees that are native to places where it doesn't snow during "leaf-out".
Yes, we were hit hard and the poor trees are hanging looooooow with all that heavy wet snow on top of the leaves.

I just find it ironic that our neighbor - the business owner - parks all his vehicles DIRECTLY UNDER the overhanging branches of the big old tree. He's got a 9000 square foot bare parking lot, and chooses to park under the one corner where the trees are. Almost like he is just willing the tree limbs to break off and do some damage to his vehicles so he can sue.

We've asked him to please move his vehicles until we can get the branches taken care of, but needless to say, the vans are still are all parked under our big tree.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2011, 03:12 PM
 
1,258 posts, read 1,468,560 times
Reputation: 1392
As someone who had neighbor's tree fall on my car and had it totaled as the result, I'm probably in a camp of "trimmers". No, I didn't have a big parking lot to park my car, it was parked in the driveway during a storm with 80 mph gusts. I got out of it about 3 min before it was smashed with that tree. I love nature, but I value my life too. If the tree presents danger to someone, I would have it trimmed, just to have clear conscience.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2016, 04:02 PM
 
1 posts, read 495 times
Reputation: 10
I am having an issue with my neighbor's apple tree. It has several branches that cross my property line by at least a few feet and every year I get the brunt of the apples falling into my yard and having to pick them up, generally after they are rotted. I want to take pictures and contact the City and County of Denver and see what my rights are. I really don't care if the tree dies or needs to be cut down, it's the principle of it all.

The same neighbors complained to me because I have a picket fence around my front yard that separates our property. It needed to be repainted and they kept on complaining about it to me. Technically they should have been responsible for painting their side but instead I took the high road and spent roughly 15 hours painting it for them, took 3 days of vacation and bought 2 gallons of paint to the tune of $50 and they barely acknowledged it. It has caused bad blood between us and karma is a *****. I will not agree to pay for the tree to be pruned. They reported me for a dead tree in my back yard and it cost me $600 to cut it down because Denver County sent me a threatening letter saying if I didn't I would be charged a fee. I have rights as a homeowner and they should be responsible for rectifying this situation. I am over it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2016, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Evergreen, Colorado
621 posts, read 502,008 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmooney69 View Post
I am having an issue with my neighbor's apple tree. It has several branches that cross my property line by at least a few feet and every year I get the brunt of the apples falling into my yard and having to pick them up, generally after they are rotted. I want to take pictures and contact the City and County of Denver and see what my rights are. I really don't care if the tree dies or needs to be cut down, it's the principle of it all.

The same neighbors complained to me because I have a picket fence around my front yard that separates our property. It needed to be repainted and they kept on complaining about it to me. Technically they should have been responsible for painting their side but instead I took the high road and spent roughly 15 hours painting it for them, took 3 days of vacation and bought 2 gallons of paint to the tune of $50 and they barely acknowledged it. It has caused bad blood between us and karma is a *****. I will not agree to pay for the tree to be pruned. They reported me for a dead tree in my back yard and it cost me $600 to cut it down because Denver County sent me a threatening letter saying if I didn't I would be charged a fee. I have rights as a homeowner and they should be responsible for rectifying this situation. I am over it.
In most places, anything that hangs over your property line is yours to use (keep the fruit)
or yours to prune. Of course you could always trim the heck out of it, and make your neighbor wish they had done it themselves.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2016, 04:55 PM
Status: "October is the eighth month" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,683 posts, read 28,516,426 times
Reputation: 6847
Generally, you can trim the tree on your portion of your property, but you may not do it so much that it endangers the health of the tree.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2016, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Evergreen, Colorado
621 posts, read 502,008 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bindenver View Post
Generally, you can trim the tree on your portion of your property, but you may not do it so much that it endangers the health of the tree.
In almost all cases you can trim anything over your property line and that includes the root system if necessary.
If the root system of a neighbors tree for example is threatening your foundation, you can do whatever is required to protect your home regardless of the health of the tree.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2018, 05:04 PM
 
4 posts, read 1,041 times
Reputation: 15
Lightbulb Who is responsible if a neighbors branch grows over your property

The Colorado Supreme Court just ruled after many years on a Boundary Tree in the Washington Park neighborhood.
But - they insist that this rule only applies to this one situation, and doesn't change things.
If you own land in Colorado, you are expected to follow the Self-Help law used in many states. Trim what you want to your boundary line. If it falls or blows on your side, help yourself and don't bother complaining about nature to the rest of us.

When a tree drops something in your yard such as a pine cone, leaf, fruit, branch, bird poop, it becomes yours.
Courts don't want to be bothered with your failure to be a good steward of your own land.
Really, do we need to pay another $100 per month of property taxes to hire a civil servant to tell us who should clean up what? In some states, they actually have detailed regulations with costly permits that can define what trees can be planted, were to plant them, how tall they are allowed to grow, and many more details. Some even require hiring a costly licensed trimmer! Costly property tax and regulations still don't solve many of the tree, neighbor problems!
So, a tree sprout grows through a crack in your fence. You think it might poke you in your eye on your side. Do you let it go and scream at the neighbors for years? No, you help yourself and cut the tree where it enters your property.
Since that sapling tree poking through the crack of your fence dies, its OK. Don't dance around reality. Its called taking care of you property.

If a higher tree branch grows sideways over your house roof, do you wait to see if it falls on your roof and to hire costly lawyers? If I am on your jury, I will wonder why you denied the self-help rule. You had a right to cut that branch at your property line because you know what is best for your property, not your neighbor. If you are that person that feels evryone else is responsible for what happens on your property; maybe you should consider renting. As a juror, I would rule against you. But, in addition you wasted everyone's time and should receive a penalty. Maybe a big enough penalty to take away your property.
Sometimes a neighbor's tree provides a Benefit such as shade, fruit or just a positive visual. You reap the benefits for 30 years, then change your mind. Perhaps you even built a structure under that branch? Now that you have changed your mind, and now you want a neighbor to pay to remove that large branch that has been over your property for years? Bull! Its your property, cut the tree to your property line, or just prune it. Complaining about a slow growing non-thinking organism is one level below self-loathing.
Good neighbors understand that tumble weeds travel, that leaves blow, that branches fill in voids.
A young couple down the street had leaves fall in their yard. The raked the leaves back, all the way to the neighbors yard where the leaves came from. This represents anarchy or taking the law into their own hands. If that is OK, can I grab the dog poop from my yard, run down the sidewalk and stuff it back from where it came? Of course not. I apply self-help and clean it up myself. Nobody should go whining to a city official.
Back to the tree that expanded where a trunk, a trunk can be a main branch angled 45 degrees from the first 6 feet of the ground. It didn't just get that way last night. You can cut a boundary tree on your property. But, stop at the trunk. But, we all know if that kills the old sick tree, it is extremely hard to hold blame for an old sick tree against the trimmer taking care of his property. If the trimmer outwardly butchering a tree on purpose, then they went too far. As for the City of Denver, we have rules about leashed dogs, about flying UAV's, carrying guns, and many other things.
What this city is missing is some common statements that would help restore some peace and personal responsibility.
We need the City Web Site to clearly state: "If a tree or shrub branch or root grows onto your property, you have a right to trim it to your property line. Don't expect someone else to do it or pay for it, take care of your own property"
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top