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Old 10-29-2011, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 318,884 times
Reputation: 257

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Quote:
Originally Posted by localgirlpdxbldr View Post
I would guess chili made with buffalo meat for the cowboys, something made with lentils, carrots and curry for the vegans. I remember having the best matzo ball soup at the New York Deli (now closed, the one where Mindy worked...) on the Pearl St. Mall in Boulder. Maybe a roasted tomato and red pepper soup? Are you starting a restaurant or something?
Yes. I know this is vague terminology but the menu will be centered around "comfort foods" and I plan to have at least one soup daily. Of course one person's comfort food might be another's slop so I figured I'd ask here first. I'd like to offer chili, WITH spaghetti, topped with tons o' cheese and onions but worry that my tastes (exquisite, btw lol) might not be regional enough to SW CO. My wife and I treat chili more like a pasta dish than a soup and that's the way I'd like to serve it but as the saying goes, it doesn't matter what I like. Beer cheese is another soup I'd like to be a staple.
I might end up doing a clam chowder too. Speaking of which, has anyone had the salmon chowder from Ivar's in Seattle? I can't imagine that anyone has a better chowder recipe than these folks. If I had kids I would gladly trade them for a bowl of the stuff.
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Old 10-29-2011, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,108 posts, read 4,678,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VenusAllen View Post
I'd like to offer chili, WITH spaghetti, topped with tons o' cheese and onions but worry that my tastes (exquisite, btw lol) might not be regional enough to SW CO.

AAAAAGH! Not the Cincinnati chili/spaghetti concoction.

Since you are in the SW Colorado, I will offer some comfort food advice. Learn to make a good green chile stew, a good bowl of red chile, and homemade tortillas.
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Old 10-29-2011, 01:56 PM
 
20,349 posts, read 37,885,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VenusAllen View Post
... the menu will be centered around "comfort foods" and I plan to have at least one soup daily. Of course one person's comfort food might be another's slop so I figured I'd ask here first. ...
Sounds like you are planning to open an eatery, which is cool. Durango is now home to a lot of people from all over, not just the locals anymore. IMO any home made soup should do well if it's mostly mainstream, like a split pea with ham, or a good veggie soup / minestrone packed with veggies and not mostly broth. I'm thinking too of a hearty bison stew and you might want to try experimenting with an Elk stew if you can get it (hunting season?).

We watch Guy Fieri's show on Food Network and have seen many diners that do a landslide business on mostly comfort foods, but the key to virtually all of these places we've seen on the show is that the food is made from scratch from quality ingredients. Like Kobe Beef Meatloaf at a diner in Truckee, NV. Many of these eateries bake their own bread; saw one last night that sounded awesome, a place that makes its own "wild rice French toast" where they make their own bread with a lot of wild rice and it's a heavy dense loaf. A lot of the owners of those diners work 60-80 hours a week and they really work at it, often starting a day in advance to get some of the entrees ready to go, like roasting beef bones 1-2 days ahead to make stock for the next day, etc, no backing up the Sysco truck and unloading a ton of canned items....

If you are planning an eatery, all the best to you guys.
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Last edited by Mike from back east; 10-29-2011 at 02:04 PM..
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Old 10-29-2011, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 318,884 times
Reputation: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
AAAAAGH! Not the Cincinnati chili/spaghetti concoction.

Since you are in the SW Colorado, I will offer some comfort food advice. Learn to make a good green chile stew, a good bowl of red chile, and homemade tortillas.
LOL No cinnamon, though. Thanks for the advice because if I've noticed a consensus, your post summed it up.
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:30 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 13,194,339 times
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The Cincinnati Chili concept came to Denver about 17 years ago with one of the Chains with a store in the Southern Suburbs. I like chili that way and ate there when I worked in an office, nearby. The restaurant failed and I suspect because it was located near mostly white collar day worker offices and the product was too heavy for a lunch for these types. They would try it once but repeat business makes the success of a restaurant. I remember going there and all of us, after lunch, wanted to take a nap.

Livecontent
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Old 10-29-2011, 04:01 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 13,194,339 times
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In my humble opinion, the idea of opening a restaurant and actually doing it are very different. To say, I like to serve a different soup, everyday. Well, that is nice but you have to make it everyday. What are you going to do with the leftovers and how will you use those ingredients in another menu item.

I did some work for some rich woman who wanted to run a restaurant with everything different everyday. I tried to explain to her that food products have to work with many different menu items or you will be forced to carry a large perishable inventory and you will lose money. She did not listen and went out of business.

You may have a special "recipe" that you love and everyone likes, so you want it on your menu. Remember that you have to do that same recipe, day after day after day. You will get sick of looking at it. Ah, you say, I will have help to make it but to attract repeat business, it has to be consistent and the same, day after day after day. You will have to have quality control, train and watch your employees, day after day after day. Of course, you will have to retrain, constantly because you will have a big turnover with employees because they come and go or you fire them because they do not come to work, again day after day after day.

As far as "scratch cooking", you have to have products that you need to do the "scratch", so the Sysco truck still has to arrive for your supplies and still with many canned goods. Scratch cooking does not mean using all products fresh from the field or on the hoof. You will have to buy processed produce and meats. Remember many processed products are products that are manufactured by specialist and they can make it better than you.

Today most restaurant buy puff pastry dough (Pate Feuilletee) and finish it to a menu item. Some trained chefs can make it themselves but is rarely done because in most places the expertise is not there; the time is not there and the product will not be consistently good. For example, canned tomatoes are a necessity in food preparation unless you are going to take the time to make your own processed tomato product. You ever try to make tomato paste? I have done it. Do you really think that you are going to make your soups that require tomatoes and use always fresh tomatoes, no, of course not--and the many soups would not be as good because you need to have a precooked long simmered tomato that will incorporate better in the flavor profile.

Yea, trying working 60-80 hours a week, week after week after week. I have done it and that is why I no longer work in that industry and now I
Livecontent
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Old 11-03-2011, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
261 posts, read 607,089 times
Reputation: 222
Mainly a Denver thing, but pho has to be on the list!
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Old 11-03-2011, 04:16 PM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,591 posts, read 11,689,429 times
Reputation: 24314
Homemade potato soup in a sourdough bread bowl thing.
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Old 11-03-2011, 04:43 PM
 
Location: The 719
13,729 posts, read 21,558,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
...and there is pork green chile stew. It has a thinner consistency with larger chunks of pork, garlic, onions, stewed tomatoes and sometimes posole (a type of Mexican hominy) or even potatoes.

Green chile stew is not that common in restaurants, but it is a staple in Hispanic households across the state and in New Mexico.
Sounds a bit like a soup I've had in a Three Margaritas called sopa de albondigas... or maybe something similar to menudo.

When I think of soups in Colorado, I think of going to Northwoods Inn on Thursday when they do/used to serve split pea soup.

I also think of getting French Onion soup at the Flying Dog brewery in Aspen.

I like Manhattan, rather than New England clam chowder. I don't know of a place to get this in Colorado.

I've had a homemade cauliflower soup from my ex-mother-in-law and a Borsch soup from my ex-father-in-law that I do miss. The former cook being Polish and the later being Russian. Nothing to do with Colorado except they live here.

My dad has a saying... The night I was born, I remember it well... there was cabbage and bacon fryin' like hell.
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