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Old 09-08-2006, 07:37 PM
 
21 posts, read 141,852 times
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We are looking to reloctate to Colorado from Maryland and I was wondering how people from lower elevations have adjusted to the thinner air of the higher elevations of Colorado Springs and Denver? How long did it take to get used to, especially with exercise and outdoor recreational activities?
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Old 09-08-2006, 08:16 PM
 
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We came here from the DC area, essentially sea level.

No problems at all for us, and I'm 58 with cardiac angina and sleep apnea. I detect no change at all in myself, living at 6650 feet.

When we took the train up Pikes Peak to 14,110 feet, we both felt odd from the altitude.

Most folks have no problem at all.

s/Mike
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Old 09-08-2006, 08:29 PM
 
21 posts, read 141,852 times
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That's great to know. We live in Anne Arundel county and our neighbor had come back from a ski trip this past winter and had gotten altitude sickness while in Aspen. I just wondered if breathing was more difficult at Denver or CS elevations. I guess if you haven't had any trouble with angina/sleep apnea, it will not be noticable. Thanks so much for all of the helpful information in your postings, Mike, it has helped more than you could ever know. We are looking at both CS and Denver. It will depend on where my husband gets the best job, but you certainly make Colorado Springs the place I'm hoping for!!! Soon we hope to be able to say "from back east" too!!!
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Old 09-08-2006, 09:14 PM
 
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Drink water! I think the biggest problem is that people get dehydrated and get a nasty headache.

When my relatives visit from back east (particularly my Mom), I have to constantly remind them to drink water. It's genereally dryer, and then the altitude seems to suck the moisture out of you.

When I moved here, to took me a year to feel like I was at the same lung capacity (I was fairly athletic then) for strenuous exercising (biking, running).
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Old 09-08-2006, 09:41 PM
Status: "October is the eighth month" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,676 posts, read 28,486,584 times
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most flatlanders feel the effects on day 2 of their stay...usually those with altitude sickness go hard the second day, not realizing the air is different and get sick.

Drink water as if you are a fish take it easy for two or three days, and you should be fine. (I grew up in Montgomery County.)

As far as baking, adding a teaspoon of flour usually works nicely in recipies.
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Old 09-08-2006, 10:43 PM
 
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did a lot of walking in and around Denver; didn't notice any problem. I do drink a lot of water. City much smaller than I expected!
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Old 09-09-2006, 12:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ivymm View Post
City much smaller than I expected!
Hi there,

My husband and I are thinking of moving to Denver and we are planing to go there for a few days some time this month. How did you like city? What the downtown looks like? Can you see coffee shops and people walking (and not driving) around? Is it anything like Boston? What is it like in city after 5pm after all offices are closed?

Thanks much
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Old 09-09-2006, 04:10 PM
 
21 posts, read 141,852 times
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QUOTE=2bindenver

"I grew up in Montgomery County."

2bindenver,

I grew up in Montgomery County, too! Silver Spring! It's a small world. Was it hard to get used to the lack of humidity or was it a welcome relief? How would you characterize the difference in quality of life between Denver suburbs vs. Montgomery County? Traffic, weather, stress level, friendliness of people, etc.. Also, how was it being so far away from your family? What made you choose Denver over CS?
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Old 09-09-2006, 05:04 PM
Status: "October is the eighth month" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,676 posts, read 28,486,584 times
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I grew up in Rockville, and Potomac, and Gaithersburg. After college at St Mary's in Southern MD, rural, farmland, amish...I needed the stimulation of a big city, moved to DC for a year. I worked at the Folger Shakespeare Theatre, and then got a job at UC Santa Cruz for the summer. Met my husband, got married, and he got transfered to Denver 18 years ago. I was a property manager/stage manager in DC & CA. So in order to have a job and not be on site, I needed a real estate salesman license.

I go back to DC for the NAR mid year meetings each year and have breakfast with my aunt. I take the CO women to see the monuments, and go out for crabs - something they have never, ever dreamed of doing.

Where I live in Douglas County is a lot like the family friendly area of Monkey County. Close enough to go visit the city, but the best school system for my children. More friendly here. You can wear cowboy boots, and nobody gives you a second look. Here today, gone tomorrow snow. Lots of outdoor activies. Average commute time 20 minutes.

Drink water, buy a humidifier for the bedrooms, drink water, oil your wood furniture, and the cabinets. Drink more water.
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Old 09-09-2006, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, MN
571 posts, read 2,250,754 times
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Ditto above on the water. My husband and I learned to drink lots of water while we lived in Colorado Springs (a good habit we brought back home when we moved back to MN.)

As others have mentioned, the important thing is to take it easy for a few days. Don't try to climb pikes peak the first day! Even after we lived there a while we somtimes felt a little short of breath when we were doing something active while camping up in the mountains (usually felt it at around 10,000 feet.) Just listen to your body and take more breaks as you need them!

I loved the drier air, but my skin didn't. Invest in good mosturizers/lotions. In the summer my heels got so rough I swear I could have made sparks on the sidewalk, lol. Also get a good conditioner for your hair. If you have naturally curly hair, you'll probably like the fact that there's no humidity to make it frizzy though
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