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Old 12-03-2011, 10:02 AM
 
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Last night, we got a nice little snowfall where I live, a few inches of nice wet snow. Temperature is not very cold, around 28 when I went outside this morning. We don't get snowfalls often, so they are nice when they happen.

So, what is making me a Grinch about this? Well, it's the same story every time it snows in my town--my local neighborhood being typical. At 7:30 this morning, just about everybody 50 and older--some in frail health--were out shoveling their sidewalks--as is required by town ordinance. The 20 to 40-somethings in the neighborhood--many with perfectly healthy teenage children--were nowhere to be seen. NOT ONE. Most every time it snows, they either just wait for it to melt off, or until they get ticketed by the city for not clearing their walks. They are just too damned lazy to even get out and shovel a few inches of snow. It's pathetic.

A friend who works for the city Public Works Dept. confirms exactly what I've described as what he sees city-wide. Many of those 20-40 somethings are also the ones who complain about why the city doesn't plow the sidewalks for them, while never being willing to pay an additional nickel in taxes for city services.

It's no wonder the state and country are in such trouble when you have a huge chunk of the population that refuse to get off their fat lazy a**es to do anything that somebody won't pay them for--even something as simple as shoveling their own sidewalk.
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Old 12-03-2011, 10:17 AM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
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Too bad there's none of those goofy protesters in the parks here. We could hand them shovels and tell them to get to work.
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Old 12-03-2011, 12:54 PM
 
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Wink Sidewalks and then snow

That I do not even have a snow shovel at the house may say enough of where I'm coming from. But content enough to make my own (narrow) trail across the snow, and shoveling what snow there is would in places only reveal dirt anyway. So probably just as well I do not live in town, and one reason why.

I'll grant that it seems a dereliction of civic duty not to shovel walkways when one has them. I've heard that Boulder for one will cite with fine anyone not clearing the public sidewalks in front of their house within 24 hours of the end of a storm. Although, on a technical note, I wonder how someone can be ordered to or cited for not dealing with what I presume the town considers a public easement? Roads may be a different matter, but I can assure you that if one with an easement across your property that the state considers it their personal property, and plowing it as they like, etc.

As a certain context, I've been elsewhere where Pacific storms more usually result in feet of snow at a time. Depending on where one is it can be similar to Colorado, with quickly plowed roads, parking lots, walkways, etc. Although not uncommon on shoveling a path from the front door to have it appear more as a tunnel, and in some cases digging down to find the entrance to your house.

In some places they never bother with most of this to begin with. The state highway is plowed, as well as parking lots, and that is it. There are no sidewalks to begin with, and you couldn't find one in winter anyway if you tried. The secondary roads are all snow-packed, with only access via foot, ski, or snowmobile. When actually there it can seem a winter wonderland with many many feet of snow which only gets added to all winter, and often melting during the day, with not an inch of asphalt in view.

But those too lazy to shovel a couple inches of snow from their Colorado walkway would not perchance find it any easier there. Beginning at the edge of your front door, you might have to shovel several feet of wet heavy snow just to get of it, and maybe again the next day. Then, if thinking of going anywhere in your car, with a good chance of hoping to discern it from another as a big lump of snow, with a good several feet newly fallen on top and all around it.

After some of that they might wish they could no more than shovel a Colorado sidewalk.
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Old 12-03-2011, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Back in COLORADO!!!
840 posts, read 2,035,873 times
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Lol, I really do enjoy your posts Jazz.....

Speaking of shoveling snow, when I was growing up, I thought shoveling snow, mowing grass, and pulling weeds were great opportunities to make a little money.... Do teenage boys not need a little pocket money where you live Jazz?
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Old 12-03-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
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^

I admit I pay someone to shovel the snow off my driveway. On my street we do not have sidewalks so that is not a issue.
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Old 12-03-2011, 03:56 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,120,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenScoutII View Post
Lol, I really do enjoy your posts Jazz.....

Speaking of shoveling snow, when I was growing up, I thought shoveling snow, mowing grass, and pulling weeds were great opportunities to make a little money.... Do teenage boys not need a little pocket money where you live Jazz?
You would think so, but teenagers everywhere apparently don't think they need to "lower" themselves to do much of any real work at anything. It's pretty pathetic. Back when I was young, I saved enough money working summers and vacations (Christmas, etc.) from about age 13 on that I was able to pay almost all of my way through 4-years of college with no debt and minimal help from my parents. What I see today is a glaring lack of work ethic in young people--no surprise, since many of their parents lack one, as well--and it seems to hold that way when those kids grow up, too.

As to Joss's comment, I've never hired anyone to clear my sidewalks, driveways, etc. of snow--EVER. I've always done it myself--and that includes when I lived in Wyoming, where I would get 3-7 foot high drifts on my 1/4 mile-long driveway several times every winter. I never missed work from being snowed in, either, in the several years I lived there. I guess some people can handle "real" winter and some people can't.
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Old 12-03-2011, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,368,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post

As to Joss's comment, I've never hired anyone to clear my sidewalks, driveways, etc. of snow--EVER. I've always done it myself--and that includes when I lived in Wyoming, where I would get 3-7 foot high drifts on my 1/4 mile-long driveway several times every winter. I never missed work from being snowed in, either, in the several years I lived there. I guess some people can handle "real" winter and some people can't.
That is why I live in the city and have no desire to live in a rural area. In Pueblo we don't get a lot of snow but when I do get a cabin in the mountains it will be in a more urban part and I will have a heated driveway and sidewalk so when it does snow all I have to do is turn on the heat and the snow will melt.
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Old 12-03-2011, 05:01 PM
 
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I protest the generalization that all young homeowners don't shovel their sidewalks. I am 31 and not only shovel my sidewalk, but the elderly couple's sidewall across the street. My neighbors, also in their 30s, are the same. So I am saddened by your post.

In my community, homeowners have 24 hours after a snowfall to clear there sidewalks. So it seems that you are jumping the gun a bit.

I too am annoyed at homeowners who never clear their sidewalks. But in my experience, this transcends age or income status.
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Old 12-03-2011, 06:20 PM
 
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My town requires us to shovel the walks within 24 hours of the end of the snowfall. It was still snowing at 7:30 a.m. where I live in the south metro area, so I did not even consider shoveling at that time. It seems futile/a waste of time to shovel while it's still snowing. Some of us prefer to shovel when the snow has stopped falling (just a preference, I guess.) I don't get upset/Grinchy if others prefer to do it 2+ times per day rather than once, though.

Also, what dreamland do you live in where teenagers are awake at 7:30 on a Saturday morning? :-)
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Old 12-03-2011, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,279,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
You would think so, but teenagers everywhere apparently don't think they need to "lower" themselves to do much of any real work at anything. It's pretty pathetic. Back when I was young, I saved enough money working summers and vacations (Christmas, etc.) from about age 13 on that I was able to pay almost all of my way through 4-years of college with no debt and minimal help from my parents. What I see today is a glaring lack of work ethic in young people--no surprise, since many of their parents lack one, as well--and it seems to hold that way when those kids grow up, too.
Older people have been whining about that all the way back to Plato's time. I'm sure those kids you accuse of being lazy will be saying the same thing a few decades from now.
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