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View Poll Results: Should Colorado Legalize Marijuana?
Yes 164 76.64%
No. 50 23.36%
Voters: 214. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-01-2012, 09:17 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,634,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
even the Dutch are realizing the problems they created when the legalized marijuana, and are looking to rein it in.
Actually what the dutch were looking to rein in is the drug tourism which attracts crowds of tokers from Germany, France, Belgium, and the UK. They want to only allow access to Dutch Citizens. They have abandoned their initial approach and have simply given the coffee shops the right not to sell to foreigners. It's not the cannabis, but the crowds they want to control.

Amsterdam ditches controversial 'weed pass' law - NY Daily News
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Old 12-02-2012, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,881,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
I see this as a one way street. This more reasonable drug policy is going to be a huge success. Douglas County will be left behind when they see that tourism is booming in Aspen and Vail, when they see they see the income stream cut out from under youth gangs in Denver County.
In the Netherlands, the problems with drug tourists is what led the government to enact laws banning tourists from marijuana cafes (which were upheld, but will not go into effect). The Dutch now have had greater problems with unlicensed street dealers, and the country has turned into the marijuana supplier for the rest of Europe. Additionally, most of the marijuana and hashish is illegally imported from other countries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Douglas County has plenty of land on which to grow hemp, will their cultivation ban include that? Hemp fields are worth astronomical numbers.
Amendment 64 does not allow commercial cultivation. It allows the home cultivation of up to 6 plants under controlled conditions.

Currently Douglas County does not have many farms other than those that grow hay. This is because the county does not have the water resources to grow anything other than grasses. Cultivating hemp is a pipe dream both because the law prohibits it, and nature makes it impossible.

FWIW: I voted no because this Amendment is poorly written, and because legalization should not be enshrined in our Constitution. Like all other initiated amendments, the unintended consequences will become prohibitive and we will not be able to act because changes will have to be done at the constitutional level.
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Old 12-02-2012, 02:42 AM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,943 posts, read 7,303,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
In the Netherlands, the problems with drug tourists is what led the government to enact laws banning tourists from marijuana cafes (which were upheld, but will not go into effect). The Dutch now have had greater problems with unlicensed street dealers, and the country has turned into the marijuana supplier for the rest of Europe. Additionally, most of the marijuana and hashish is illegally imported from other countries.



Amendment 64 does not allow commercial cultivation. It allows the home cultivation of up to 6 plants under controlled conditions.

Currently Douglas County does not have many farms other than those that grow hay. This is because the county does not have the water resources to grow anything other than grasses. Cultivating hemp is a pipe dream both because the law prohibits it, and nature makes it impossible.

FWIW: I voted no because this Amendment is poorly written, and because legalization should not be enshrined in our Constitution. Like all other initiated amendments, the unintended consequences will become prohibitive and we will not be able to act because changes will have to be done at the constitutional level.
Yes it does. Amendement 64 allows for the commercial cultivation of INDUSTRIAL HEMP (cannibis indica), NOT Marijuana you can smoke to get high (cannabis Sativa). They both look identical, but hemp has only trace amounts on THC, you could smoke it until you're blue in the face, and nothing will happen. It's only good for making paper, rope, clothing, and other textiles.

The permits will go on sale 1 oct 2013 for Industrial Hemp cultivation.
And take it from someone who's actually grown it, you need very little water for it to grow. It is afterall, a weed.
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Old 12-02-2012, 07:57 AM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,930,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
In the Netherlands, the problems with drug tourists is what led the government to enact laws banning tourists from marijuana cafes (which were upheld, but will not go into effect). The Dutch now have had greater problems with unlicensed street dealers, and the country has turned into the marijuana supplier for the rest of Europe. Additionally, most of the marijuana and hashish is illegally imported from other countries.
And that means that Colorado will be exactly the same because they have one similar law.

Never mind that Colorado is not the only legal state in the country, compared to the only legal country on a continent. Never mind that other states are enthusiastically talking about following in our footsteps.

"They are the marijuana supplier for the rest of Europe." "Most of the marijuana and hashish is illegally imported."

^^Not only are these claims far from the truth, they contradict one another. Economically it doesn't make sense to pass black market product through a legal market and export it back out, none. You only loose money in that process.

"Because of laws that restrict tourist from cafes, street dealing is going up."

This is a symptom of prohibition! How obvious can it get? Those dealers would not exist if these tourist could safely buy Cannabis in a cafe or in their home country, period.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
Amendment 64 does not allow commercial cultivation. It allows the home cultivation of up to 6 plants under controlled conditions.

Currently Douglas County does not have many farms other than those that grow hay. This is because the county does not have the water resources to grow anything other than grasses. Cultivating hemp is a pipe dream both because the law prohibits it, and nature makes it impossible.
False information, both about the law change and the plant it's self. Read the reply below. Also, read a book on Cannabis Indica, I would suggest "The Emperor Wears No Clothes" by Jack Herrer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
Yes it does. Amendement 64 allows for the commercial cultivation of INDUSTRIAL HEMP (cannibis indica), NOT Marijuana you can smoke to get high (cannabis Sativa). They both look identical, but hemp has only trace amounts on THC, you could smoke it until you're blue in the face, and nothing will happen. It's only good for making paper, rope, clothing, and other textiles.

The permits will go on sale 1 oct 2013 for Industrial Hemp cultivation.
And take it from someone who's actually grown it, you need very little water for it to grow. It is afterall, a weed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
FWIW: I voted no because this Amendment is poorly written, and because legalization should not be enshrined in our Constitution. Like all other initiated amendments, the unintended consequences will become prohibitive and we will not be able to act because changes will have to be done at the constitutional level.
I voted yes on this amendment because the power of choice belongs with the individual and not the state. You obviously view the state as a nanny. Let's look at history (I know that is counter productive for your side of the argument.) The government track record for "taking care of" it's citizens is very poor, in every country, in every time period. Rights belong with the individual.

You voted no on it. So somehow, you think, that you have the choice on what I put in my body, You do not.

The law will morph and evolve. It is not stuck as is. Look at alcohol prohibition, it works out. Look at other historical accounts of removing prohibition laws from the books, you won't like what you see, because it does the opposite of reenforce your point, but you may gain some insight.
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Old 12-02-2012, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,837,299 times
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Old 12-03-2012, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Colorado
11,628 posts, read 7,195,062 times
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LOL Cosmic Wizard...

Thanks, Ryan, for the common sense answer on hemp, I was gonna pipe up (omg pun) on that, until I saw what you said there...

I also heard that growing hemp actually revitalizes soil that has had its nutrients stripped from growing other crops, but I don't know the details on that. A coworker who cares more about it than I do told me so. *shrug* I do know that it's a relatively prolific plant that grows with less water than many crops, and can be used for a stunning array of different textile products, fuels, plastic type products, even food additives (that have no psychoactive effects.) I read about a product called "Hemcrete" (I think) which was used to build a house in Asheville, NC initially, maybe a few more since then. The Hemcrete is a sort of lime based concrete reinforced with hemp fibers, and in combination with the other recycled and renewable materials used, this house lacks the toxic vapors and chemicals that make other new homes less healthy to live in, it is fire resistant, mold resistant, and the Hemcrete actually gets structurally more solid and durable as time goes on. I want to say they were claiming that the house had an expected lifespan, if not deliberately demolished, of thousands of years.

The reason the product isn't more commonly used is that importing the hemp from countries where it's legal to grow is prohibively expensive. If it were available from domestic sources, it would be one of the cheapest building materials out there, supposedly. Anyways it was interesting.

Oh, and pot as a gateway drug? Yeah, it is. But ONLY because of the fact that, due to prohibition, some individuals have increased access to other substances when they do business with the black market to get it. I go to Walmart for milk and wind up also buying a shirt, some mac 'n cheese, and a DVD...none of which I really needed, but I walked past it and it was on sale. Was milk the gateway to me spending an extra $20? And yet, I could have chosen differently, just as plenty of pot smokers choose NOT to become crack addicts.
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Old 12-03-2012, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Downtown Co Sps
666 posts, read 1,036,791 times
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The Hemp House.
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Old 12-03-2012, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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Sonic_Spork wrote: If it were available from domestic sources, it would be one of the cheapest building materials out there

This is ONE of the reasons that cannabis has been demonized. It poses a threat to the monopolies of several industries.
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Old 12-04-2012, 06:17 AM
 
Location: A great city, by a Great Lake!
15,908 posts, read 10,042,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Sonic_Spork wrote: If it were available from domestic sources, it would be one of the cheapest building materials out there

This is ONE of the reasons that cannabis has been demonized. It poses a threat to the monopolies of several industries.

You are correct. So, the other companies should have to come up with a better product, instead of game the system, because that is what competition is about.
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Old 12-04-2012, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,837,299 times
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no1brownsfan wrote: You are correct. So, the other companies should have to come up with a better product, instead of game the system, because that is what competition is about.

The big money boys in every industry have purchased legislation to protect their monopolies and PREVENT any serious competition. That's why the voters of Colorado, passing prop 64 is such a big deal. We are effectively saying that the time has come to bring down some of these monopolies. I can hear the pleasant sound of monopolies crashing.
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