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Old 12-14-2011, 07:50 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,021,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
You could have your recreation better and easier in NY. There is natural beauty and real water bodies in New York, that is with natural fish vs. stocked fish in mostly artificial water bodies in Colorado. Do you not know your own State? There is much more to New York State than the area around New York City, contrary to the arrogant and self-centered attitudes of its residents and the princes and princesses of Long Island. Yea, that is another reason I am not in New York--a One City State with its vassal upstate Regions and Cities which are ignored.

You could move to somewhere in the State--to Upstate which people of New York City call anything not where they can myopically see, and not know all the other regions of the Empire State that is Western New York, The Southern Tier, The Great Lakes Region, The Thousand Islands, The Finger Lakes, Lake Champlain, The Adirondacks, The Hudson Valley, the The Catskills etc.

There is many areas to live in New York or many other Eastern States, that are centrally located and can give you all the recreation you seek and can be gotten much easier than some remote areas of Colorado that are not accessible all year round. In addition, there are few highways and roads through much of these areas and the popular areas get constipated with the wealthy, the wantabees, and the skiers who make access even more difficult or impossible on weekends.

You want a New Yawk answer--forgetaboutit! Come and visit and see. Come and visit in the winter and see or better yet, make your life in the East and stop dreaming. Many people post on this forum and they want others to substantiate their delusions--well I ain't gonna do it--so get outta h're, D ya knowatta mean!

Livecontent
I live south of the Finger Lakes region and it's not mind blowing but it's a decent area and actually has real water.

The Adirondacks I find are just as beautiful and in many ways more pleasant than Colorado. The weather I find is more predictable/steady and more 4 seasons with more color in fall. The other thing with Colorado is that of the rural areas, it lacks the frequent small towns you find back in the Northeast and it's hard to get access to many mountain areas of CO.

So I don't think there is any real geographic cure.
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,903,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sgrrsh26 View Post
But the weekends Id like to be able to spend at locations like the pictures, whether relaxing, fishing, hiking. Again I understand you dont see those sights every day, but are they so out of reach that you can't make a lifestyle out of visiting them on the weekends?
Yes you can.

One thing to realize is that "day trips" are difficult. Distances are long and driving in the mountains is sometimes slow. You can do day trips to places that are within, maybe 100-120 miles. Beyond that it gets harder.
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:56 PM
 
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Most of Colorado is just a day trip away from Denver. Durango being the longest drive at 6.5 hrs. On long weekends, take the 6hr trip. On a regular weekend a 4hr drive can cover a lot of the state and give you a lifetime supply of hiking and camping options. I'm from the east too, and even the worst traffic/drivers here doesn't come close to any big city on the east. You'd love it here.
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
I live south of the Finger Lakes region and it's not mind blowing but it's a decent area and actually has real water.

The Adirondacks I find are just as beautiful and in many ways more pleasant than Colorado. The weather I find is more predictable/steady and more 4 seasons with more color in fall. The other thing with Colorado is that of the rural areas, it lacks the frequent small towns you find back in the Northeast and it's hard to get access to many mountain areas of CO.

So I don't think there is any real geographic cure.
I am jealous. I would drive through the finger lakes on my way to college from Buffalo. A very beautiful area. I thought I would settle somewhere in New York State. I left WNY over 42 years ago and sometimes I think...ah, what I can I say...life has a way of forging new paths.

I am here is Colorado for 33 years. It is home and will remain my home because it has the comfortable familiarity of place. That sense of belonging takes years to establish and I do not have the time, the energy or the will to start again. I am happy here. Denver is a wonderful city, much better than the decay of Buffalo, and the weather suites me.

Livecontent
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:15 PM
 
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Quote:
I want to be able to experience something different every weekend for the rest of my life, and I know it's possible there.
Remember that Colorado is pretty much mountains, plains or high desert, with a bit of tallgrass prairie stretching from Colorado Springs to Fort Collins and receiving a whopping 13-15" of rain a year. While there's plenty to do, I'm not sure you'll find "something different" to do every weekend ... you can try a new ski area or hike or bike a new trail, perhaps ...

You don't give us much sense of what kind of place you want to live - in the mountains? There are many nice little towns, at different elevations - some I like are Salida (nice scenery, lower elevation in a valley at around 7,000 feet, not a ski town), Glenwood Springs and Carbondale (spectacular views), Summit county (if you don't mind living at 8,000+ feet, you'd have skiing, cycling and even sailing nearby), Durango (very nice town, a bit bigger at around 20,000 people, with a small college, but quite remote) ... if you are looking for some city/job opportunities with nature nearby, Boulder/Boulder County or Fort Collins in the Front Range, or Grand Junction in the high desert west but near the mountains and Grand Mesa, may fit the bill ... Colorado Springs is right up against the mountains and has nice areas like Manitou Springs next door ... then there's of course Denver, but it sounds like that's not what you're after.

Last edited by docwatson; 12-14-2011 at 08:24 PM..
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Old 12-14-2011, 09:08 PM
 
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One big draws for me is the skiing. From what I've been told/seen/read is that western beats the eastern icy crowded trails bar none.
As far as where I want to live, Colorado springs seems the most reasonable in that it wont be such a huge change as if I were to live in some small town in the middle of nowhere. Denver is within reach and skiing is all around. I would like to be skiing in the winter and in the spring and summer months I want views. Trails and national parks, kayaking, mountain climbing, rafting, biking, fly fishing, hunting.

This is the type of life I want. A natural playground.
I've always considered the adirondacks. It is gorgeous I've been there many times. But again what you trade off for lush forests is sub par skiing. I'll have to try Colorado out for myself.

Is there no areas in Colorado where you can find landscape a pinch similar to the adirondacks? Where do you guys go in the fall to watch the leaves change. That's something I'd miss.

Are there a lot of cave systems? That's another cool thing about the adirondacks. And some of you mentioned the lack of lakes. Can anyone lay that situation out for me?
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Old 12-14-2011, 10:35 PM
 
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Reading this thread reminds me a lot of when I first came out here on dreams two and a half years ago. The dream of Colorado and the reality of living here can be quite different. I will attempt to answer your concerns to the best of my knowledge. I have never seen the Adirondacks, but I assume that they would be somewhat similar to the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, which is where I originally hail from. First of all I cannot stress this enough, come visit! You can get all the explanations you want on this forum, but until you see the reality of Colorado's landscape with your own eyes it will be very difficult to conjure up an image of what we are talking about. The landscape pictures that you looked at where taken in the short 3 month alpine summer and do not paint a realistic picture of Colorado. For most of the year it is brown, yes brown, compared to back East, but I'll explain more about this later.

Colorado Springs



Colorado Springs is a city of 450,000 situated at the base of Pikes Peak, the easternmost fourteener (mountain above 14,000 feet) in the United States. Colorado Springs has a host of recreational activities, primarily hiking and mountain biking. Many people who live around the Colorado Springs area can give you more of the specifics, but some of the major attractions are Garden of the Gods (pictured above), Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, Cave of the Winds (One of the few natural caves in the area), Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, and whitewater rafting down the Royal Gorge (1 1/2 - 2 hours to the southwest in Canon City). The closest ski areas are Monarch Mountain (a small local hill) to the south about 90 minutes away and Summit County (home to Breckenridge, Copper Mountain, Keystone, Arapahoe Basin, & Loveland Ski Area) is about a 2 1/2 hour drive depending on traffic each way.

Rocky Mountains vs. Appalachian Mountains

Rocky Mountains


Appalachian Mountains (Smoky Mountains in Tennessee)


The differences between the two mountain ranges are illustrated in the pictures above (if they display properly). The big difference is the profound lack of precipitation in the two areas. Many parts of the Appalachian Mountains (including the Adirondacks) get between 40-80 inches of liquid precipitation a year, whereas the Rocky Mountains of Colorado get between 10-30 inches of liquid precipitation per year. Colorado is very far inland and sits at the intersection of 3 major storm tracks, which makes precipitation patterns anything but normal. The East Coast has the Atlantic Ocean & Gulf of Mexico in close proximity which makes for a reliable source of moisture. The climate here is a high desert, even in the high mountains. Except for the short spring the predominant color here is brown. The grass on the high plains is dormant 6-7 months of the year and is thus brown. You need to remember, Colorado is a high alpine desert despite what people may say about the mountains getting more precipitation. This is generally true, but they more or less are high enough that the snow sticks around for 7-8 months out of the year. They do get more of it than the plains and valleys, but not bucketloads more, just a little more.

Lakes & Caves

Green Mountain Reservoir


Cave of the Winds


The one area that the East Coast has Colorado trumped in my opinion is in the number and size of lakes. Compared to what you have seen in New York what we have are puddles, put plain and simple. Most of the "boating lakes" could pass for large ponds back East and they are very small and very crowded with boaters during the short summer season. The only exception to this rule are the reservoirs that are above 9,000 feet in elevation and are frigidly cold (the water temperature barely gets above 50 degrees on those lakes). As far as caves go, the only one that I know of that could compare to back East is Cave of the Winds near the base of Pikes Peak just west of Manitou Springs. The majority of the rock out here is solid granite or gneiss and water doesn't hollow out that type of rock very easily unlike Limestone, which we have a profound lack of.

Conclusion
In closing, I cannot stress enough how much you need to visit and get an idea of what Colorado is truly like before making such a leap of faith to come out here. Even though I lived out here for 3 years as a kid in Colorado Springs and came out here for numerous ski trips, I was pretty shocked at how fast my romantic vision of Colorado was shattered by the realities of living out here. I almost gave up because of the culture shock, but as the ski season came and I went to work up at one of the resorts, I found myself "falling in love" with what Colorado really was, not what it isn't. The skiing is what sold me on this state as well as it becoming home in a sense. Are there tons of recreational activities in this state? Yes, can you have the job and the recreation close by? Yes, but what are you willing to sacrifice to get it? Living in the mountains is incredibly expensive and inaccessible to most because they are unwilling to make the sacrifice it takes to do so. Come out here and visit, get a feel for what it is really like and try to see the reality of Colorado rather than the "paradise syndrome" that so many Colorado dreamers have. If the reality of Colorado is something you think you would enjoy, then start making preparations. When you come to visit don't set your expectations to an unattainable level, make sure to look and talk to people who are living & working here to get a feel for it all. Best of Luck!

Denver
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Old 12-15-2011, 12:22 AM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,021,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sgrrsh26 View Post
One big draws for me is the skiing. From what I've been told/seen/read is that western beats the eastern icy crowded trails bar none.
As far as where I want to live, Colorado springs seems the most reasonable in that it wont be such a huge change as if I were to live in some small town in the middle of nowhere. Denver is within reach and skiing is all around. I would like to be skiing in the winter and in the spring and summer months I want views. Trails and national parks, kayaking, mountain climbing, rafting, biking, fly fishing, hunting.

This is the type of life I want. A natural playground.
I've always considered the adirondacks. It is gorgeous I've been there many times. But again what you trade off for lush forests is sub par skiing. I'll have to try Colorado out for myself.

Is there no areas in Colorado where you can find landscape a pinch similar to the adirondacks? Where do you guys go in the fall to watch the leaves change. That's something I'd miss.

Are there a lot of cave systems? That's another cool thing about the adirondacks. And some of you mentioned the lack of lakes. Can anyone lay that situation out for me?
As far as the natural situation goes, with most moisture falling high up on steep slopes, for eons it always ran off quickly into a few major river systems and then out of the state. So there has always been little opportunity for lakes or ponds to form. There are now more lakes but they are man made reservoirs and not always attractive as they drain of water in summer.

In September above 7500 feet and mostly on the western slope, the Aspen trees drop their leaves and that is a good time of the year to visit Colorado up in the mountains.

All that stuff you want is around but you've got to drive to get to it if you live in Denver or CO Springs. With no traffic(unlikely) it's a 2 hour drive to get to most main resorts. Sunday afternoon coming back to Denver can vary but 4-6 hours is not uncommon, especially when weather is bad. Maps of Colorado can be misleading as roads appear straighter and easier than they are, but traffic, weather and winding roads tack on time.

As I pointed out in a previous post, it either makes for a long day or a committed weekend and most people that live on the Front Range don't make it up as much as they think they will.

I'd visit first and get a feel for Colorado and where exactly all this stuff is and what is involved. After doing that you'll be able to refine your focus.
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Old 12-15-2011, 06:01 AM
 
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Thanks wanneroo
And skifreak that post should be pinned
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Old 12-15-2011, 09:46 AM
 
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That Denver photo is one of the typical "hype" photos. It was taken with a long telephoto lens to bring the mountains "closer" in the photo. It also was taken on one of the winter days when the Chinook winds blew the "brown cloud" smog layer that Denver frequently suffers in the winter to the east and out of the photo. Just like those Playboy pin-up girls probably never look as good in person as they do in the magazine foldout, Colorado seldom looks as gorgeous in person as it does in the promotional photos. When Colorado is at its most beautiful it is incomparable, but no one should labor under the misconception that anyplace in Colorado looks that beautiful all the time, or that all of Colorado is as pretty as its prettiest spots. In fact, a lot of Colorado can be downright desolate--either some of the time or all of the time.
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