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Old 12-17-2011, 11:37 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,143,563 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenScoutII View Post
Oh, one final thought... No, there is no such thing as good Mexican food here in Houston. Go figure.... In an area with such a strong Hispanic presence and such a sizable number of Mexican immigrants, how is it that green chile is seemingly unknown to this town?......
That's because green chile is a NEW Mexican delight that most Texans have never even heard of. And there is nothing much worse in the way of food than the Anglicized Tex-Mex slop that has become pervasive in Texas. I've had some great REAL Mexican food in Texas, but you have to look off of the beaten track to find it.

One final note of mine: I've found the Texans IN Texas, especially the rural areas, to be really nice folks most of the time. Odd, though, how so many of the Texans who come to Colorado, either as tourists or residents (many of the latter as part-time residents), are arrogant jerks who like to flaunt their wealth (whether or not they really have it) and Texas heritage around like it makes them better than anyone else. Long-time Rocky Mountain residents (all the way from New Mexico to Canada) get real tired of that after awhile--especially if they are in a line of work where they have to deal with them on any regular basis.
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Old 12-17-2011, 04:25 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,849,218 times
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Wink Price paid and also gained

The answer to such a question must be a personal response.

It is possible to live in the mountains of Colorado, but in the bargain made most feel too expensive. It is one thing to jet into Aspen with several million dollars in the bank account, buy a comfortable home, and come and go as you please. Yet another when more likely working some seasonal, relatively low-paying, job at one of the ski resorts, and wondering how in income one is going to weather the inevitable off-seasons. Some do find a way to make a decent income and therefore living high in the Rockies, but most living really comfortably have arranged as much without much need of a local income, and some real money from elsewhere. For a good many others life and its comforts can be a bit less certain, more indifferent condo or apartment than sumptuous log cabin, if of course within a scenic setting.

The compromise most in Colorado make is to set the dreams and mountain living on the back burner, and settle along the front range where the best job market, most services, and easiest living is. Still a place with many advantages, and with any money at all probably a rather pleasant life-style. Only not exactly in the mountains. Those with urban amenities, but a house in the forest, have arranged for a good enough income to afford a certain compromise. Such as, for instance, west of Boulder in the foothills. Since Boulder Canyon deposits one directly into the mountains from the west edge of town, this is entirely possible if with the resources.

But even here, more than money is involved. Despite dreams to the contrary, in reality many would not favor a place like Summit County, or San Juan for that matter, where winter may not precisely, but seems to exist nine months of the year, and even in summer with reminders that it will soon be back again. It is milder, and decidedly warmer, at the lower elevations. Thus even if near a front range town, one need consider if preferring to deal with the greater snow outside of town, and blazing a trail down to it, or perhaps just happier to be somewhere with sidewalks, and a good view looking back up at mountains one doesn't want to deal with on a regular basis.

That is a reality probably come to terms with sooner than later. I'm optimistic that with determination one can live at 10,000 feet and be perfectly happy, but this in no way discounts the excellent advice routinely offered on this forum by others, in advising the uninitiated elsewhere in love with a postcard, to consider what it may not be showing. They often fall in love with the scenery from a distance, or even brief vacation, but somehow gloss over fiscal realities not disappearing at the border. Indeed, possibly all the sterner. All things being equal, it is probably less expensive to live in a good many other places and states than in Colorado. Call it a scenery tax that even applies in the urban areas. All the higher in the mountains with often costly real estate and rents, and without a vast number of job options. That is what is spoken of.

So a personal decision. For some it is certainly worth it. There is a certain satisfaction, even if maybe in Louisville in a downsized house that will not hold your former furniture, that your view of the horizon has snow on it throughout the year.
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 318,743 times
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Who have been in Colorado for at least 5 years and who moved to escape the oppressive summers...
Only been here five months but I had to comment on the weather differences.

Are you glad you did?
Absolutely. "To escape the oppressive summers" of the south was our impetus for moving here, everything else was secondary. Unless you've lived there, you can't relate. Occasionally, I yearn for "home" but I jolt myself back to reality with thoughts of the incredible heat and humidity we left behind. Being highly inquisitive, I always ask new acquaintances what brought them here, and if from a southern state, invariably the heat and humidity are cited as THE primary factor in their move.
Though you didn't ask this specifically, my wife and myself have been bowled over at the graciousness of our new neighbors. Almost to a fault, everyone is super friendly and we have wondered aloud many times "What is their agenda?", or "When is the other shoe going to drop?". Having grown up there, we've heard about southern hospitality our entire lives, but personally, we just don't see it. Close family and friends are one thing, but we find there are too many fake Paula Deen-types (not that she's fake): hospitable, drawling, oozing sweetness to your face, and then gossip behind your back at the drop of a hat. Not a phenomenon seen only in the south, but still a contradiction, and something we have yet to experience in Colorado. Maybe it's a Durango thing, which attracts loads of "wanderers" like ourselves. Simply speculation, but without our collective friends and family we've left behind, everyone goes out of their way to be friendly because "we" are all "we" have? Whatever it is, we like, and appreciate it...a lot.

What do you miss the most about where you left?
The things that hold most back from realizing their potential: the yearning for friends, family, and familiarity. Fortunately, Colorado has airports and interstates that run west to east because, for us, living in that sauna wasn't living, at all.

What most frustrates you about Colorado?
Lack of familiarity, which has nothing to do with Colorado, per se. Example: I knew who to call "back home" when I needed a car part, favor, etc., so we're still getting our sea legs under us, so to speak, but that will come.
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Old 12-18-2011, 02:42 PM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,583 posts, read 11,679,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outflowboundary View Post
Who have been in Colorado for at least 5 years and who moved to escape the oppressive summers...

Are you glad you did?

What do you miss the most about where you left?

What most frustrates you about Colorado?
Who have been in Colorado for at least 5 years and who moved to escape the oppressive summers...

I've only lived here for two years, from Arkansas. I grew so tired of the humidity there. I love the fact that here the humidity is low, there's no tornadoes, ice storm and hordes of bugs. Of course that makes mandatory drinking lots of water, using sunscreen and chapstick. I also enjoy the fact that in the evenings, it cools down during the summer and is very pleasant. I remember summer nights in south Arkansas where at 3am it was 92 degrees with 90% humidity. I've been in three tornadoes, never ever again. I'll take blizzards anytime.

Are you glad you did?

YES! I find that people here, once they discover I didn't move here to change everything, were accommodating, friendly, and warm. I love the four seasons here, the mountains, the wide open spaces, and the laid back lifestyle.


What do you miss the most about where you left?


I miss my friends, miss being able to go to every Arkansas Razorbacks game, and my two favorite restaurants in Fayetteville - Mermaid's and Mama Dean's.


What most frustrates you about Colorado?

Inept state government, the fact that Denver thinks it's the center of the universe, the fact my car insurance tripled, car tags quadrupled, housing is costly. It's expensive to live here.
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Old 12-18-2011, 02:50 PM
 
Location: United State of Texas
1,708 posts, read 5,274,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenScoutII View Post
Oh, one final thought... No, there is no such thing as good Mexican food here in Houston. Go figure.... In an area with such a strong Hispanic presence and such a sizable number of Mexican immigrants, how is it that green chile is seemingly unknown to this town?......
Great post. Very informative. Well done.

In answer to your above question, the green chile is far more popular in the Southwest US than it ever was in Mexico. Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona seem to think it somehow IS Mexican food. Mexican food here is either TexMex (overdone with the chili powder and greasy) or Interior Mexican (mild and flavorful). The Mexican food cooked in the traditions of actual interior Mexico is quite good.

Most Americans have never had anything but SW US Mexican or TexMex.

I have only been a visitor of Colorado, but I found most places there to be quite pleasant... if you look past the tourist zones.
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Old 12-18-2011, 03:40 PM
 
33 posts, read 44,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zembonez View Post
In answer to your above question, the green chile is far more popular in the Southwest US than it ever was in Mexico. Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona seem to think it somehow IS Mexican food.
You know I have actually wondered about this for some time. I grew up in Southern NM where green chile is a staple. I always thought green chile was one of the staples of Mexican food. Then I got to Texas and it wasn't here. What didn't add up, though, was that there are actually of a lot (maybe all??) of "mom and pop" Mexican food restaurants here locally, started by Mexican people (from Mexico) who have elected not to serve green chile at their establishments.

Your comment above may explain this disconnect that I have observed... these probably aren't the same Mexican people that I grew up knowing in the Southwest, but probably people from elsewhere in Mexico.

Enough of a tangent. I don't want this to become a green chile thread, so we'll return to the OP's (me :-)) questions now.

Thanks for the helpful comments so far.
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Old 12-18-2011, 03:56 PM
 
33 posts, read 44,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
I also enjoy the fact that in the evenings, it cools down during the summer and is very pleasant. I remember summer nights in south Arkansas where at 3am it was 92 degrees with 90% humidity. I've been in three tornadoes, never ever again. I'll take blizzards anytime.
I don't like to sound whiny, perhaps maybe I am, but that is the point I have reached. I am not native to Texas or the south by any means, but the summers that I have endured here are misery. I have lived in places that have hot summers my whole life, and I have never liked them. However, the summers I knew in southern NM, while perhaps a little hotter than here, were more tolerable for the reasons you mention.

Sure, maybe some Coloradoans resent Texans as has been pointed out by other posters, but I highly doubt they would know the difference once my license plates were no longer red white and blue.

As far as the cold... I guess all people are different. I don't know how I would handle long drawn out periods of cold since I have never experienced them. But I do know that I have a lot of coats, jackets, and gloves that I hardly use now, because it just doesn't get cold enough to put them on.

The big difference between hot and cold is that you can dress for cold. You cannot (un)dress for the heat. You simply reach a point where removing more clothing just doesn't help (and can in fact hurt). A body loses its ability to cool itself when the dew point reaches a high enough value. It doesn't matter whether you are acclimated to it or not. This is simple physics (study evaporative cooling).

Jim, I remember your id now and reading many of your posts above your move. Very informative.
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:12 PM
 
33 posts, read 44,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VenusAllen View Post
Having grown up there, we've heard about southern hospitality our entire lives, but personally, we just don't see it. Close family and friends are one thing, but we find there are too many fake Paula Deen-types (not that she's fake): hospitable, drawling, oozing sweetness to your face, and then gossip behind your back at the drop of a hat.
You know southerners do come across as a lot friendlier. But in the end, people still are people, and if we are honest most of us carry some flaws in our character.

I always laugh about the "southern" phrase that goes some like "did you hear about poor Bobby, bless his heart" which is then followed by some of the juiciest gossip you will hear.

I am sure that different areas have some different regional tendencies, expressions, and figures of speech or ways of interacting with one another. But once you get past the facade, you might find something very different. Maybe for better, maybe for worse.

And it is my experience that sweeping generalizations of people just don't work well. You really have got to approach people on a one by one basis. In Texas, Colorado, or anywhere else.

Quote:
What most frustrates you about Colorado?
Lack of familiarity, which has nothing to do with Colorado, per se. Example: I knew who to call "back home" when I needed a car part, favor, etc., so we're still getting our sea legs under us, so to speak, but that will come.
Seems like this is always a barrier to moving: upsetting the status quo. This very thing makes me have tendencies about ever moving as well. But as you say, this isn't unique to Colorado. It is probably never good to get "too comfortable" with a place, because you never know if you will have to leave it.
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Old 12-18-2011, 05:51 PM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,583 posts, read 11,679,485 times
Reputation: 24291
I quickly got used to the cold. It's a different cold than the damp cold of Arkansas, it's a dry cold. When I lived in Ridgway, 25 degrees with sunshine and no wind a windbreaker or long sleeve shirt was plenty. 25 degrees in Arkansas I would be wearing everything I owned and still be cold. I dress in layers in winter, the cold isn't really that bad here.
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Old 12-18-2011, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 318,743 times
Reputation: 257
You're right, OP, by stereotyping my fellow southerners in this way I'm as guilty as I accuse them of being phony...sorry.
I concur with Jim's point about the humidity creating a different type of cold: bone-chilling. My wife's co-worker in New Mexico, a retired military man, mentioned to her that he had once been stationed at Fort Knox (KY), a mere fifteen miles from our old home, and it was the most miserable winter he had ever experienced. Other places may be colder, but it's the added humidity that acts like a syringe to force that cold into your bones.
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