U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-24-2011, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Back in COLORADO!!!
840 posts, read 2,033,622 times
Reputation: 1377

Advertisements

OK, I'll list my Colorado creds so as not to provoke the ire of Jazzlover....

I am a third generation native born Coloradoan. Sadly, I was sucked into the abyss the rest of the world knows as Houston, but I'm coming home within the next 30 days.... (That's a subject for another thread..)

Anyway, on my dad's side I'm descended from the hearty Norwegian stock who settled the area around Limon in the early 1900's. A few of my relation still farm in this area today....

On my mom's side, my ancestor's were the eastern Europeans who came and worked for the rail roads and in the coal mines down by Trinidad. Yes, some of my kin were even at Ludlow. Still others were among the Hispanic people who had lived in what is now southern Colorado before it was even a US territory...

I myself own a small ranch east of Pueblo which I eagerly anticipate returning to shortly.

So, now that I've established my credentials, here are some of my thoughts on rural living in Colorado....

The biggest challenges in the winter are icy/snow packed roads and and a sometimes unreliable power grid. This can vary quite a bit from location to location, generally speaking however, the further out you are, the more these things can be a problem...

If one wishes to live out in the sticks, a back up generator can be considered essential. Ideally, a diesel powered unit which can power the whole house is just the ticket, but this is often beyond the means of a lot of folks. As such, a portable unit big enough to run a few essential circuits can suffice.

Be sure to have enough gasoline on hand to run the generator for a few days.

Also, I consider a 4X4 or AWD vehicle essential for country living. If one lives in town, it's a nice-to-have, but not essential.

If anyone in your household requires daily prescription medicine, make sure an adequate supply is maintained.

Since most rural properties are on propane, it's a good idea to have a propane stove in your kitchen rather than electric. The propane stove will work in the absence of electricity.

Also it is a good idea to have a second heat source available in case of failure of the first. I'm a big believer in pellet stoves for this purpose if one is out on the plains. Conventional wood burning stoves are good if one is in the mountains where he'll have access to wood.

I have a few others I'll chime in later with.......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-24-2011, 03:03 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,099,702 times
Reputation: 9065
Green Scout,

I pretty much agree with all of the above that you posted. When I lived where I used propane for heat, I had a large tank and I never let it get below half in winter. Nothing worse than seeing the propane gauge at 20% full when the roads are going to be impassable for the propane trucks for a week. Some of my neighbors had propane-fueled standby generators that would run off the home propane supply. For them, having adequate propane supplies on hand was even more critical. I used a small gasoline generator that would run essential appliances. In that use, I could get by on about 5 gallons of gasoline per day--I kept at least 25 gallons out in my storage shed during the winter.

Pellet stoves are OK if one can get reasonably priced pellets and the supply is not interrupted. If one lives in an area where coal is available, I actually prefer it. A ton or so of coal is not that expensive and one can heat a house with it for a considerable time, if necessary. Yes, it is dirty, and, yes, it does require some knowledge (and a proper stove) to use it safely and effectively.

I'm really glad that I live in town these days, and do not have to use propane for fuel--it is only going to get more expensive as oil prices explode. Natural gas is going to go up in price, too, but not as fast as propane. The are only two ways to improve home energy efficiency: One is to invest in energy-efficient appliances, heating, insulation, etc. and/or using less expensive alternative energy sources--be those "conventional" or "exotic." The other is to reduce heated square footage. I've done both in the last few years, and I'm "sitting pretty" compared to a lot of people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 04:02 PM
 
20,308 posts, read 37,797,930 times
Reputation: 18082
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
.. as oil prices explode....
You need to reconsider that line of thinking; oil companies are fracking the hell out of the energy fields, our nation now EXPORTS more petroleum than it imports, with exports due to rise.

Source is the Wall Street Journal.
Excerpt: According to data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration on Tuesday, the U.S. sent abroad 753.4 million bbl of everything from gasoline to jet fuel in the first nine months of this year, while it imported 689.4 million bbl.

Thus we're exporting about 250,000 bbl per day of petroleum products.

If you have factual sources (Kunstler's apocalyptic blog doesn't count) we'd love to hear them.

Myself, I don't expect any explosion in oil prices. I can only foresee that if the Saudi fields suddenly go off-line, and no one expects that, no matter how unstable the middle east might be.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Back in COLORADO!!!
840 posts, read 2,033,622 times
Reputation: 1377
Thanks Jazz.....

Truthfully, I hadn't even considered a coal stove. It is a good idea though. Please forgive my ignorance, but would you happen to know where a person could buy coal? I assume it would be sold bulk by the ton. I'm going to look into it and explore the idea further... The only time I've ever bought coal is for blacksmithing and it was about $200 for four fifty pound bags...

You're absolutely right. One has to make sure he has plenty of propane on hand if inclement weather is moving in. Propane costs a fortune and seems to go higher every year, which is why I was striving to reduce my dependence on it. Wood pellets can occasionally become scarce, but I would typically buy two tons in the spring when there is less demand. Last time I bought them they were about $225 per ton.

I could have used about 1/2 that amount, but my wife who I affectionately refer to as the furnace queen, likes the house a bit warmer than I do......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 04:21 PM
 
20,308 posts, read 37,797,930 times
Reputation: 18082
Scout, there's a thread in the COLO SPGS forum about coal availability in that region.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 05:07 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,099,702 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
You need to reconsider that line of thinking; oil companies are fracking the hell out of the energy fields, our nation now EXPORTS more petroleum than it imports, with exports due to rise.

Source is the Wall Street Journal.
Excerpt: According to data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration on Tuesday, the U.S. sent abroad 753.4 million bbl of everything from gasoline to jet fuel in the first nine months of this year, while it imported 689.4 million bbl.

Thus we're exporting about 250,000 bbl per day of petroleum products.

If you have factual sources (Kunstler's apocalyptic blog doesn't count) we'd love to hear them.

Myself, I don't expect any explosion in oil prices. I can only foresee that if the Saudi fields suddenly go off-line, and no one expects that, no matter how unstable the middle east might be.
Once again, Mike, you misread the facts and follow off the media pukes telling only half the story. The article quotes statistics about REFINED products. Yes, we are exporting more refined products than the amount of refined oil products that we currently are importing. That says NOTHING about the amount of crude oil we are still importing--and that continues around 60%-70% of the crude oil that is ultimately used in this country. The story is just another example of a "feel-good" story that does not tell the TRUE story of the dire energy situation facing this country that the sheeple refuse to acknowledge.

Maybe you should spend some time, like I do, talking on a regular basis to the people who actually work in the oil and gas fields. They are not nearly as sanguine about our energy situation as you are, and they are the people who are actually working to produce the stuff.

Green Scout,

There are several mines and suppliers that sell coal retail in the North Fork Valley (Paonia, Somerset) that sell lump or stoker coal, and I believe that the mine in Durango still sells retail. Don't know about the mines up around Steamboat/Hayden/Craig.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 05:40 PM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 6 hours ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,536 posts, read 11,632,560 times
Reputation: 24188
No ones mentioned the cold in winter. It can be sunny, mild in the 50's during the day, and when the sun sets, the temps can plummet to single digits. I've seen people not prepared for that, and always have a blanket (an old army heavy wool blanket) in the trunk of my car. One night last year it was 35 below zero in Ridgway, that was the actual air temp. It was zero here in Delta this morning. I've had visitors and have known people who were just not prepared for the cold at night. It doesn't bother me, I learned how to dress for it. Just something else to consider. Cold and snow and bears oh my.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 05:48 PM
 
20,308 posts, read 37,797,930 times
Reputation: 18082
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Once again.....
Once again, no facts, just smoke, amateurish name calling (again) and alleged conversations with people in (fill in the blank) industry; not that low level workers in any industry have much of a clue about their industry trends.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 07:28 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,021,080 times
Reputation: 7537
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
No ones mentioned the cold in winter. It can be sunny, mild in the 50's during the day, and when the sun sets, the temps can plummet to single digits. I've seen people not prepared for that, and always have a blanket (an old army heavy wool blanket) in the trunk of my car. One night last year it was 35 below zero in Ridgway, that was the actual air temp. It was zero here in Delta this morning. I've had visitors and have known people who were just not prepared for the cold at night. It doesn't bother me, I learned how to dress for it. Just something else to consider. Cold and snow and bears oh my.
People always talk about the sun and how great the sun is during the winter, keeps you warm blah blah. Yeah that is great when the sun is actually up! And in a lot of mountain towns or depending on where your house sits, you might only get a few hours of direct sun a day. The apartment complex I lived in a good portion of my time in Vail, in the winter if the sun was shining that day, you'd get direct sun from around 10 AM to around 3 PM. 5 hours out of 24. Once the sun was gone the temp dropped like a rock. A lot of times people live on the north slope of a mountain or valley edge and you might only get 1-3 hours of direct sun a day.

Two other effects I noticed in Colorado:

1. If you are in a valley, when the sun comes up it warms the upper layers of air first, squeezing the cold air down into the valley. I remember in Steamboat it would be -5 at 5:30 AM and as the sun came up the temp would plummet to -25F and would only level back out around 10 or 11 in the morning.

2. If you get any kind of snow fall that covers everything and the storm clears out at dusk and the skies clear, all the snow on everything acts as a freezer and the temp drops like a rock. You can go from 20F with cloud cover to -20 with clear skies in a few hours.

What it comes down to is never take anything for granted with weather in Colorado. It can change drastically in a very short space of time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,895 posts, read 8,873,507 times
Reputation: 18302
It was a beautiful day here in Colorado Springs. Somewhat cold, yes, but a brilliant blue sky. I went over to Garden Of The Gods and hiked around a bit and got some pics. Quite crowded for winter...perhaps 300 people there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top