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Old 01-04-2012, 08:33 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 13,206,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post
there is a company in NC that is curing hams the old fashioned way. They can't ship the hams but you can buy the sliced pieces at a country store. There was a two part article about it in the Charlotte Observer a year or so ago.

On the eastern shore, out toward the Outer Banks, they were still curing meat the way it was done in england. It is called "corned meat", heavily cured with salt. I bought some pig tails in a little store one night on my way to the Banks. The clerk said that was the only kind of cured meat anyone in the area used. Some time later, I was reading in Nat Geo or Smithsonian about this being the way the original settlers cured their meat and the tradition had continued.

By the way, I used the pig tails to cook with turnip greens and turnip roots and they were the best I have ever made or eaten.....ambrosia to a southerner......

One of my daughters that lived in MD asked me what i wanted for Christmas several years ago. I said a real country ham. She sent me a smithfield that was huge. I didn't know how to cook it and ended up giving it to an acquaintance. I wish I had not done that but, it appeared to be awfully complicated to prepare it from the instuctions on the wrapping.

I have eaten many homemade biscuits with red eye gravy, country ham and grits.....I'm starting to salivate...LOL>
Interesting Post. FYI, "corned meat" is named as such, because the traditional salt used in curing meats was called "corned salt" because it was large and had the texture of corn meal. It is the reason for the name, Corned Beef.

I worked, for a time, outside Baltimore and the food products were outstanding. Colorado does not have the old traditions like the east coast.

Livecontent
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Old 01-05-2012, 12:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
...I worked, for a time, outside Baltimore and the food products were outstanding. Colorado does not have the old traditions like the east coast....
My home town. Lots of good food there. I really miss the crabcakes from my favorite places, the ones here cannot compare.

I recall Mom getting one of the hams that used to hang from the beams outside of roadside stands in S.E. VA. IIRC they were wrapped in burlap. She had to soak it in water for a couple of days to remove a lot of the salt. One of the food companies in Baltimore (Mash's Hams) used to sell low-salt hams as an alternative to the salty stuff, came in half-inch-thick slices packed like steaks in the standard supermarket meat trays; decent stuff, but not that deep pink coloration of the salty stuff, which is a great flavoring agent for green beans.
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Old 01-05-2012, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,896 posts, read 5,891,475 times
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Quote:
Salt beef
Quote:
in the UK and Commonwealth as a cured and boiled foodstuff is sometimes known as corned beef elsewhere, though traditional salt beef is different in taste and preparation. The use of the term corned comes from the fact that the Middle English word corn could refer to grains of salt as well as cereal grains.
Quote:
Although the exact beginnings of corned beef have been lost to history, it most likely came about when people began preserving meat through salt-curing. Evidence of its legacy is apparent in numerous cultures, including Ancient Europe, and the Middle East.[3] The word corn derives from Old English, which is used to describe any small hard particles or grains.[4] In the case of "corned beef", the word refers to the coarse granular salts used to cure the beef.[3]
these are both from wikipedia.
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Old 01-06-2012, 12:26 AM
 
5,091 posts, read 13,206,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post

these are both from wikipedia.
Thanks, as I said, with the our word for corn coming from the word for all grains, in the past. However, entomology of words and expressions are centered and changed to a current remembered times when the other origin is lost in time. Meaning that curing during our time and place, in America, would equate the corn salt with the grain which is more familiar, because corn, though sharing the same name as all grains, denotes a specific grain.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 01-06-2012 at 12:39 AM..
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Old 01-06-2012, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Colorado - Oh, yeah!
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I can't vouch for the authenticity, but there are a couple of links at:

National Country Ham Association

The first one I clicked on was Smoked Meats | Spiral Sliced Hams | Buy Online | Free Shipping | Burgers' Smokehouse and they ship smoked and unsmoked country hams.

As for a recipe, I haven't tried this one, but it sure looks interesting and not too intimidating:

Country Ham Recipe : Alton Brown : Food Network
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Old 01-06-2012, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
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IIRC CRACKER BARREL sells Country Hams that are brought in from Kentucky. Pricy but good.
GL2
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Old 01-06-2012, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
19,089 posts, read 8,996,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
Interesting Post. FYI, "corned meat" is named as such, because the traditional salt used in curing meats was called "corned salt" because it was large and had the texture of corn meal. It is the reason for the name, Corned Beef.

I worked, for a time, outside Baltimore and the food products were outstanding. Colorado does not have the old traditions like the east coast.

Livecontent
Oh yuck, you brought back an old bad memory.

When I was a kid my grandmother would sometimes by canned corned beef for sandwiches. I never really liked it much, and then one day while I was eating one of the sandwiches, something seemed just a little too chewy. Turned out to be a cow's nipple! :-(
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Old 01-07-2012, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 319,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Oh yuck, you brought back an old bad memory.

When I was a kid my grandmother would sometimes by canned corned beef for sandwiches. I never really liked it much, and then one day while I was eating one of the sandwiches, something seemed just a little too chewy. Turned out to be a cow's nipple! :-(


Sorry, but that's so gross it's hilarious.
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Old 01-07-2012, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 319,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunluvver2 View Post
IIRC CRACKER BARREL sells Country Hams that are brought in from Kentucky. Pricy but good.
GL2


I never thought to check with CB, thanks for the heads up.
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Old 01-07-2012, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VenusAllen View Post

Sorry, but that's so gross it's hilarious.
A gross experience a lot of us farm kids have had that city kids probably never experience is cracking open an egg and seeing a half developed chick end up in the frying pan. It takes a strong stomach to eat eggs for a week or two after that happens.

GL2
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