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Old 01-17-2012, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,527 posts, read 8,277,952 times
Reputation: 2116

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
From the link about acute altitude sickness:

Complications
•Coma

•Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema)

•Swelling of the brain

These are definitely serious problems.

Those indicate some sort of underlying genetic predisposition or heart problem. Not typical symptoms of acute altitude sickness.
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Old 01-17-2012, 10:05 AM
Status: "Fall is here!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,413 posts, read 91,307,297 times
Reputation: 28037
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
Those indicate some sort of underlying genetic predisposition or heart problem. Not typical symptoms of acute altitude sickness.
My link is from a medical encyclopedia.

Here is another link, more clinical, from the CDC:

Altitude Illness - Chapter 2 - 2012 Yellow Book - Travelers' Health - CDC

Inadequate acclimatization may lead to altitude illness in any traveler going to 8,000 ft (2,500 m) or higher. Susceptibility and resistance to altitude illness are genetic traits, and no screening tests are available to predict risk. Risk is not affected by training or physical fitness. . . . .

Acute Mountain Sickness
AMS is the most common form of altitude illness, affecting, for example, 25% of all visitors sleeping above 8,000 ft (2,500 m) in Colorado.


Perhaps you have some liks that show something else?
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Old 01-17-2012, 10:41 AM
 
9,810 posts, read 17,987,366 times
Reputation: 7489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
My link is from a medical encyclopedia.

Here is another link, more clinical, from the CDC:

Altitude Illness - Chapter 2 - 2012 Yellow Book - Travelers' Health - CDC

Inadequate acclimatization may lead to altitude illness in any traveler going to 8,000 ft (2,500 m) or higher. Susceptibility and resistance to altitude illness are genetic traits, and no screening tests are available to predict risk. Risk is not affected by training or physical fitness. . . . .

Acute Mountain Sickness
AMS is the most common form of altitude illness, affecting, for example, 25% of all visitors sleeping above 8,000 ft (2,500 m) in Colorado.


Perhaps you have some liks that show something else?
Yep.

No one really knows, it can happen to anyone. Anyone that thinks otherwise isn't medically informed and can consult with a knowledgeable medical professional if need be. Yes there are some risk factors like smoking and age that can cause more problems, but still anyone can have problems. If one considers this scenario, you take someone living on the coastal Atlantic seaboard with thick and humid air and then within a day or two dump them at 8000 ft with a 30-40% cut in oxygen available and with dry air and intense sunshine, that's a big change up for someones body to adjust to.

From what I have experienced myself and talking to others, sleep is where it gets a lot of people which is why I recommend venting a window at night, even just the tiniest crack, even in winter, to let air circulate. Anytime I go back I get tiny nosebleeds at night and I've known people to have full blown nosebleeds in their sleep. And then you have buzzy feeling headaches, dizziness, nausea and barfing.

I found over the years living at 8000 ft that I adjusted to the point it was harder for me to go back to sea level and that over the years 8000ft began to feel what was normal to me. I think now having been away for a few years it would be like starting all over again if I moved back.

Mostly this whole deal about altitude sickness, it's nothing to run around in panic like a chicken with it's head cut off, but it's just something that people need to be aware of and if they don't feel right, descend to a lower altitude and consult medical attention if need be.
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Old 01-17-2012, 11:04 AM
 
50 posts, read 105,694 times
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[SIZE=3]When I was much younger, and in excellent condition, I did a backpacking trip in the Colorado Rockies. I paced myself and, at 12,000 feet, the only “discomfort” I experienced was the desire that my chest could expand another 2 inches or so. Most people will not experience severe symptoms of altitude sickness at 8,000 feet, particularly if they exercise the good sense to slowly gain additional altitude and don’t overexert themselves initially. On the other hand, serious problems can occur when someone flies in from sea level to Aspen and hits the slopes on the following day or, similarly, when visitors to Colorado Springs take the Cog Railway to the 14,110-foot summit of Pikes Peak the day after their arrival. These are the true recipes for disaster and can be easily avoided with proper preparation. [/SIZE]
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Old 01-17-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,527 posts, read 8,277,952 times
Reputation: 2116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Susceptibility and resistance to altitude illness are genetic traits,
ummm. exactly what i was saying
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Old 01-17-2012, 12:46 PM
 
50 posts, read 105,694 times
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[SIZE=3]Incidentally, fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) and swelling of the brain are not uncommon . . . for mountain climbers in the Himalayas at 25,000 feet. Consequently, virtually all climbers will use supplemental oxygen in that rarified environment.[/SIZE]
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Old 01-17-2012, 04:29 PM
Status: "Fall is here!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,413 posts, read 91,307,297 times
Reputation: 28037
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
ummm. exactly what i was saying
Cherry picking. Here's the rest of it:
no screening tests are available to predict risk. Risk is not affected by training or physical fitness. . . . .

In short, no one knows until they go to altitude if they have the genetic trait for altitude sickness. Also, this is in an article about ACUTE altitude sickness. Chronic altitude sickenss is a different illness; as the name implies, it results from long-term exposure to high altitudes.

http://www.travdoc.com/articles/05.html
There is also a chronic form of altitude sickness called Monge's disease, which occurs in people who live at high altitudes for long periods of time. This consists of high blood pressure, chronic headaches, vision problems and depression.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 01-17-2012 at 04:40 PM..
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Old 01-17-2012, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Arlington, Va
236 posts, read 364,725 times
Reputation: 132
currently in Kansas City... still deciding on Co Springs or Denver as an arrival, which will be done tomorrow as Kansas City is explored. We got a late start Monday because of the switch up in the vehicle to a 4X4, it's brand new though and I took delivery with only 43 miles on the odometer.

I have been heeding the warnings about the altitude and have researched all the links which people posted about. I have taken note and plan to play it safe better than being sorry... I will hang at 5000ft and play for a day I suppose. Reading how it comes on and even a day or two later got my attention mainly for my little woofie because she's so light weight.

Cincinnati was very nice, it's a very clean city... But St Louis was a bit different, t must be an older city. Kansas City excellent! is a little more populated maybe (have not checked demographics yet) I did go through some torrential downpours which forced people to stop at times (2x) the rain at moments created white-out conditions hitting the road so hard in IL.

there are definitely some wide open spaces out this way
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Old 01-17-2012, 10:14 PM
Status: "Fall is here!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,413 posts, read 91,307,297 times
Reputation: 28037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic Artifact View Post
there are definitely some wide open spaces out this way
You ain't seen nothin' yet!
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Old 01-17-2012, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Southeastern Colorado
319 posts, read 581,673 times
Reputation: 434
Thx for checking in with us, Cosmic. Enjoy all those intro acts. Before you know it, you'll have a front-row seat (not to mention a backstage pass) for the Main Attraction! Safe journey to you...
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