U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-26-2012, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,901,170 times
Reputation: 2435

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by looking2goWest View Post
Hello - my family and I are looking at moving up into the mountains of WY, MT or CO. We'd prefer a small mountain town where the neighbor helps neighbor mentality is still intact.
In colorado:
Collbran
Paonia
Cedaredge
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-12-2012, 04:46 AM
 
Location: relocating
69 posts, read 155,185 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by md21722 View Post
When it comes to giving your kids all that they deserve, keep in mind rural areas do not generally have the same educational opportunities as urban areas. For example, honors classes & AP classes that are taken for granted in urban areas may not be available in smaller districts. I would also look at areas in East Tennessee, Western North Carolina, or Upstate South Carolina. In those areas you can buy a good chunk of land at a reasonable price, be in or near National Forests and still be near cities and employment opportunities.
This would probably not be the case with Durango, given the presence of Ft. Lewis College - a top rated publically funded liberal arts college - although I don't know about advanced high school courses. Durango has a low cost of living compared to Denver, Boulder, Vail, and Aspen (probably tied or a little higher than w/ Ft. Collins), and the town continues to expand with more big box stores.

I don't agree with these posters' interpretations and condescending attitudes that these are phony resort towns on the west side. I have traveled the entire state at length and have yet to make a decision between CO and neighboring states. The western slope is one of the most economically healthy parts of the Western US. Durango has a thriving natural resource and education based economy and is growing, with a diversity of several industries, and higher education. I've traveled the entire state, and if I was to choose one small town combining educational opportunities, outdoors, and corporate job opportunities, it would be Durango (and see comment about Farmington, NM below). And, overall, the entire economy in Colorado is doing better than most western states, and foreclosures are not significant to the west coast or New England where the OP is.

Durango is also 45 minutes to Farmington, NM and both cities offer opportunities in natural gas (and NM has Coal), and perhaps the OP's goal of working for a Corporation.

Durango is also not that isolated; it's just 4 hours from Albuquerque, the closest major metro, whereas many mountain towns are much further, given the necessity of crossing 10,000 foot passes between them and the nearest metro. There are none of these high passes between Durango and Albuquerque unless you go through Chama, NM which is unnecessary.

That said, when can we build a 6 lane expressway, transit, or buses from Rio Rancho, NM to Durango?

Last edited by JuniperRidge1; 02-12-2012 at 05:06 AM.. Reason: Durango CO and Farmington NM
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2012, 04:49 AM
 
Location: relocating
69 posts, read 155,185 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic Artifact View Post
anywhere west of I25, 30+ miles.

Nederland comes to mind... had a great time there, gas (on) the mountain was $2.85 with no ethanol added. I believe I got 400 miles out of that tank in the mountains too!
Nederland, and vicinity - few services, very windy, too high elevation, and dangerous narrow commute down to Boulder. Nederland's library is about 400 square feet and there's only one (Independent) grocery store.

Durango is a much more reasonable choice with plenty of jobs, 50,000 persons in the county, and just 6% unemployment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
In colorado:
Collbran
Paonia
Cedaredge
The population of all of these is under 2,500. Perhaps the OP could clarify what size of town they are looking for, along with the level of services they need in terms of grocery stores, big box stores, and medical care. Some Colorado small towns like Salida, Eagle, and Frisco have Wallmart but that may be the exception to the rule, and not all of them are the "super" variety. Each City-Data city profile lists the number of commercial establishments.

Last edited by JuniperRidge1; 02-12-2012 at 05:08 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2012, 07:53 AM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
2,970 posts, read 6,605,182 times
Reputation: 5679
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post
Nederland, and vicinity - few services, very windy, too high elevation, and dangerous narrow commute down to Boulder. Nederland's library is about 400 square feet and there's only one (Independent) grocery store.

Durango is a much more reasonable choice with plenty of jobs, 50,000 persons in the county, and just 6% unemployment.



The population of all of these is under 2,500. Perhaps the OP could clarify what size of town they are looking for, along with the level of services they need in terms of grocery stores, big box stores, and medical care. Some Colorado small towns like Salida, Eagle, and Frisco have Wallmart but that may be the exception to the rule, and not all of them are the "super" variety. Each City-Data city profile lists the number of commercial establishments.
Eagle does not have a Wal-mart
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2012, 08:37 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post

I don't agree with these posters' interpretations and condescending attitudes that these are phony resort towns on the west side. I have traveled the entire state at length and have yet to make a decision between CO and neighboring states. The western slope is one of the most economically healthy parts of the Western US. Durango has a thriving natural resource and education based economy and is growing, with a diversity of several industries, and higher education. I've traveled the entire state, and if I was to choose one small town combining educational opportunities, outdoors, and corporate job opportunities, it would be Durango (and see comment about Farmington, NM below). And, overall, the entire economy in Colorado is doing better than most western states, and foreclosures are not significant to the west coast or New England where the OP is.

Durango is also 45 minutes to Farmington, NM and both cities offer opportunities in natural gas (and NM has Coal), and perhaps the OP's goal of working for a Corporation.

Durango is also not that isolated; it's just 4 hours from Albuquerque, the closest major metro, whereas many mountain towns are much further, given the necessity of crossing 10,000 foot passes between them and the nearest metro. There are none of these high passes between Durango and Albuquerque unless you go through Chama, NM which is unnecessary.

That said, when can we build a 6 lane expressway, transit, or buses from Rio Rancho, NM to Durango?
Well, I have four decades of experience with Durango. And my father was doing business there before that--likely before your were born. As for me, I live in western Colorado (and have for most of 40 years), have traveled Colorado more than "extensively"--constantly would be a better word. I have probably better inside information and insights on the rural Colorado economy than most anyone on this forum--certainly better than most any outsider.

Now, about Durango. Durango has an economy that, while bolstered by the energy industry, is still basically grounded in tourism and real estate development. The latter industry has been funded for decades by mostly well-to-do transplants (either retirees or trust-funders) that haven't had to rely on the local economy for a living. A lot of them do fine, but that "customer base" is shrinking as US wealth gets concentrated in fewer and fewer hands. The upper-middle class has been Durango's bread-and-butter (the uber-rich gravitate to resort ghettos like Aspen or Telluride) and that upper-middle-class is not escaping the squeeze being put on the rest of the middle class.

Durango has fared better than some other western Colorado towns because of the energy industry presence and because it does serve as somewhat of a trade center for southwest Colorado. I say "somewhat" because Farmington is constantly nipping at it heels in that regard, and I have no doubts that Farmington will dominate the regional trade in the Four Corners area more and more.

At the end of the day, though, Durango still lives or dies on tourism. One major hiccup in the national economy, one major supply disruption and/or price run-up for gasoline prices, and the Durango economy could tailspin into depression in a heartbeat. The likelihood of such events happening? Pretty damned likely, in my book. Oh, and a lot of the so-called "industry" in Durango (besides the gas industry) is utterly dependent on cheap transportation (both passenger and freight) in order to survive. One cursory look at geography (and economic geography is an area where I've done analysis for over 30 years) will tell you that Durango is poorly situated in terms of both geography and transportation to fare very well in a high-transportation-cost environment--which is exactly where the US is headed in the long-term.

Finally, anyone who thinks that foreclosures are not a significant issue in western Colorado is dreaming. That is another area that I deal with on a daily basis in my work--I'm down in the trenches dealing with that every day.

PS--How many times have you been in Durango? I've been there 8 times in the last 3 months alone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2012, 09:11 AM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,017,909 times
Reputation: 7537
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post
I don't agree with these posters' interpretations and condescending attitudes that these are phony resort towns on the west side. I have traveled the entire state at length and have yet to make a decision between CO and neighboring states. The western slope is one of the most economically healthy parts of the Western US. Durango has a thriving natural resource and education based economy and is growing, with a diversity of several industries, and higher education. I've traveled the entire state, and if I was to choose one small town combining educational opportunities, outdoors, and corporate job opportunities, it would be Durango (and see comment about Farmington, NM below).

Durango is also not that isolated; it's just 4 hours from Albuquerque,
I'm going to burst the bubble on that one, because I don't believe it is realistic. It sounds like great PR but not based in any sort of reality.

I'll have to let all my relatives know about this booming western slope economy because after 2007, they have all struggled as has everyone else we know. The 2nd home market in construction and sales has imploded. Tourism is sketchy and seasonal. Mineral extraction and development is highly variable and right now in Colorado much more slow than it should be.

Durango is only 16000 people and the whole county is 50000 people. It has a little more retail and service businesses than a town of it's size because it is a regional center and there is nothing for miles around.

I think it's awesome if you can find a great job there but there are a limited range of options available, especially if you are not locally connected. Durango just doesn't have that many corporate opportunities.

And it IS isolated. If you don't like Durango or get cabin fever, there isn't much on offer nearby. Other than Farmington, you are hours from the next reasonably sized town, much less a metro area. And hours from the nearest interstate highway. Most people in the USA are not used to living 4-6 hours from another city. It might be for some, but not for everyone and I think people need to have that appreciation for what that really means if they go down the road.

All this hypothetical stuff you expose sounds great, gettin' it done is another. Find a job first that pays enough for you to live on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2012, 12:34 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
I'm going to burst the bubble on that one, because I don't believe it is realistic. It sounds like great PR but not based in any sort of reality.

I'll have to let all my relatives know about this booming western slope economy because after 2007, they have all struggled as has everyone else we know. The 2nd home market in construction and sales has imploded. Tourism is sketchy and seasonal. Mineral extraction and development is highly variable and right now in Colorado much more slow than it should be.

Durango is only 16000 people and the whole county is 50000 people. It has a little more retail and service businesses than a town of it's size because it is a regional center and there is nothing for miles around.

I think it's awesome if you can find a great job there but there are a limited range of options available, especially if you are not locally connected. Durango just doesn't have that many corporate opportunities.

And it IS isolated. If you don't like Durango or get cabin fever, there isn't much on offer nearby. Other than Farmington, you are hours from the next reasonably sized town, much less a metro area. And hours from the nearest interstate highway. Most people in the USA are not used to living 4-6 hours from another city. It might be for some, but not for everyone and I think people need to have that appreciation for what that really means if they go down the road.

All this hypothetical stuff you expose sounds great, gettin' it done is another. Find a job first that pays enough for you to live on.
Right on! If you are trying to make a living in the local economy in western Colorado, "struggle" is a word in most people's daily vocabulary. Not that it can't be done--I'm living proof that it can--but it is a far more challenging and difficult existence than most people are willing to endure. That is why the Front Range metroplex, disgusting as it is, is full of people from western Colorado--the struggle got to be too much for them. For young people starting out, western Colorado--and rural Colorado, in general--is especially economically hostile. That is why a lot of very smart, well-educated, motivated young people who grew up in rural Colorado have to go elsewhere to find decent work. The people who do stay and manage to make a decent living in rural Colorado usually do so because they are exceptionally motivated, willing to sacrifice financially to stay in rural Colorado, and have substantial local connections to snare the few decent jobs or careers that are available. A lot of Colorado wannabes are loathe to accept that latter point, but that really is the way things are here in rural Colorado.

Last edited by jazzlover; 02-12-2012 at 01:13 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2012, 02:12 PM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,790,850 times
Reputation: 18081
Jazz, it's the same just about everywhere; the same old rural vs urban decision; a personal dynamic of people leaving rural areas for the urban job centers has been going on for a good 150 years. Aside from the scenery I don't think rural Colorado is materially different than most rural areas in the USA. People should follow their dream, wherever it takes them, and see how it goes. Meanwhile, we're here to give them advice to assure they reach a good outcome.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2012, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Ned CO @ 8300'
1,993 posts, read 4,182,664 times
Reputation: 2762
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post
Nederland, and vicinity - few services, very windy, too high elevation, and dangerous narrow commute down to Boulder. Nederland's library is about 400 square feet and there's only one (Independent) grocery store.
Just curious... few services? What services do you feel the town is lacking?
To correct some misinformation...
We have a beautiful new library, there is a very good grocery store and a co-op which are more than adequate for a community of this size.
The "dangerous narrow commute" made me laugh out loud!

Last edited by Neditate; 02-12-2012 at 03:27 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2012, 07:05 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Aside from the scenery I don't think rural Colorado is materially different than most rural areas in the USA. .
Bluntly, that shows a glaring lack of understanding of geography. Most rural areas of the USA outside of the Rocky Mountain West are within a 150 miles of a metro area. Here in the Rocky Mountain West that IS different. Even here in the Rocky Mountain West, though, many rural places have direct access to either the Interstate highway system or mainline rail service (maybe not for passenger, but for freight). Durango has neither and that puts it in a potentially bad place should motor fuel prices explode or should there be a fuel supply disruption (both of which I consider highly likely within the next few years). Durango is not unique in this region in that regard--and I never said that it was--but I also have never recommended any geographically isolated places as a good long-term bet for what I believe lies ahead in this country. Oh, and if somebody pipes up and says that doesn't matter in Durango because they have good air service that will keep it viable--well, that's a bunch of crap. Every damned thing that comes into Durango--and I mean nearly everything necessary (except, maybe, natural gas) to keep the economy and the population alive--has to come in by truck, and it has to come from a long ways. If you don't believe it, cut out the 4-corners region from a map and lay it over the Northeast USA--it'll damned near cover it up.

There are some small towns in this region that are fairly remote, but still relatively close to rail connections and trade centers--Durango just isn't one of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top