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Old 02-13-2012, 11:23 PM
 
Location: relocating
69 posts, read 145,862 times
Reputation: 29

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Serious?

You are going to build a 6 lane highway between a city and a town of 16,000 people over rough terrain?

That's not even real world but off on planet Mars.
Yes, but obviously not in the rough topography areas that you refer to, where it would be too expensive - along with bus rapid transit to allow affordable transportation to Durango from Santa Fe / Albuuqerque. Already, there's rapid transit running through much of central NM up to Santa Fe.

Growth in Western CO is inevitable, especially in La Plata County, given that many rich, baby boomer retirees and young outdoors enthusiasts, live in overcrowded areas in large US cities with crime and will leave, irregardless of whether or not they end up with a job at Wallmart in Durango, Bend, or wherever.

The economic geography of SW colorado will change with more tellecommuters and custom home builders from the coasts. The complaints of the OP about Connecticut explain why many folks are interested in SW CO.

You can check for papers by Dr Tim Wojan of the USDA about the transformation of the exurban west by way of the creative class young people ages 20-40. Tim Wojan - USDA/ERS Staff Biographical Page

You can also check for info about bus rapid transit and Tellecommunications here from John Niles - Global Telematics: Telecommunications Transportation Travel Telecommuting Transit-Oriented Development Telework
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Old 02-14-2012, 06:18 AM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
2,794 posts, read 5,937,956 times
Reputation: 5059
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post
Yes, but obviously not in the rough topography areas that you refer to, where it would be too expensive - along with bus rapid transit to allow affordable transportation to Durango from Santa Fe / Albuuqerque. Already, there's rapid transit running through much of central NM up to Santa Fe.

Growth in Western CO is inevitable, especially in La Plata County, given that many rich, baby boomer retirees and young outdoors enthusiasts, live in overcrowded areas in large US cities with crime and will leave, irregardless of whether or not they end up with a job at Wallmart in Durango, Bend, or wherever.

The economic geography of SW colorado will change with more tellecommuters and custom home builders from the coasts. The complaints of the OP about Connecticut explain why many folks are interested in SW CO.

You can check for papers by Dr Tim Wojan of the USDA about the transformation of the exurban west by way of the creative class young people ages 20-40. Tim Wojan - USDA/ERS Staff Biographical Page

You can also check for info about bus rapid transit and Tellecommunications here from John Niles - Global Telematics: Telecommunications Transportation Travel Telecommuting Transit-Oriented Development Telework
How are you assisting the OP?

It seems that you just want to push your deluded agenda, without any knowledge based in reality.
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Old 02-14-2012, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,725 posts, read 15,626,133 times
Reputation: 9169
wanneroo wrote:
You are going to build a 6 lane highway between a city and a town of 16,000 people over rough terrain?

That's not even real world but off on planet Mars.
What we really need to adequately serve the transportation needs of Durango are bullet trains coming in from Albuquerque, Phoenix, Denver, and the dark side of Mars.
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Old 02-14-2012, 10:25 AM
 
8,318 posts, read 23,785,472 times
Reputation: 8955
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post
Growth in Western CO is inevitable, especially in La Plata County, given that many rich, baby boomer retirees and young outdoors enthusiasts, live in overcrowded areas in large US cities with crime and will leave, irregardless of whether or not they end up with a job at Wallmart in Durango, Bend, or wherever.

The economic geography of SW colorado will change with more tellecommuters and custom home builders from the coasts. The complaints of the OP about Connecticut explain why many folks are interested in SW CO.
That is a bunch of delusional dreaming. There may be a large number of wealthy Baby-Boomers, but they are the last relatively wealthy generation we are going to see in the US. Even a lot of the Baby Boomers are seeing their net worth slaughtered in the last few years. "Young outdoor enthusiasts" can't pick up the slack--many, if not most of them couldn't afford to buy an outhouse in a town like Durango. Custom home builders? Who are they going to build for, if the underlying economy and demographic isn't there? Telecommuters? They can't support an entire local economy, even if they are attracted to an area. And, many of them work in jobs that, with regularity, require them to travel to a corporate office at some point. If that becomes financially or logistically difficult, then they probably won't be living in a place like Durango.

I'll give you a great example. A friend of mine is a telecommuter for a software company, and she moved to a remote town the Rocky Mountain West a few years ago. It seemed like a great idea until the cost of monthly trips required by her employer to the company's corporate headquarters rose to $800 roundtrip just for airfare (much of that being the cost of airfare from the rural airport near where she lives to the hub in either Denver or Salt Lake City--both hubs an 8 hour drive from where she lives if she chose to drive). The company then politely informed her that she would have to stand that cost herself since it was HER decision to live in a place remote from the corporate headquarters and--despite the fact that she worked for a software company--she would still be required to travel in person to headquarters for monthly meetings. She is now evaluating whether she will try to work for another company (but over a year of job prospecting has not turned up another job) or whether she will relocate close to her employer's headquarters. My bet is that she will wind up relocating.

The other issue with Durango and a host of other places in Colorado and the Southwest is water. The water situation continues to get more tenuous all the time. The idea that this region can continue to accommodate more and more population really IS delusional--a concept that people from other areas of the country just can't seem to "get." Water is one thing that no amount of dreaming or conjuring can make more of. We have what we have and, if recent trends are an indication, we may have less of in the Southwest if current climatic trends continue. Yeah, you can dry up agriculture and wetlands, build a dam or two more here and there, but that only moves water around--it doesn't make more of it for the long-term.

Reality is a harsh mistress who really gets p***ed off when you ignore her. And people like the poster I quoted here is really giving her the cold shoulder.
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Old 02-15-2012, 03:03 AM
 
Location: relocating
69 posts, read 145,862 times
Reputation: 29
Default Durango Technologically Advanced

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogmama50 View Post
How are you assisting the OP?

It seems that you just want to push your deluded agenda, without any knowledge based in reality.
In several posts I suggested Durango as the best moutain town for the OP given their objectives.

Perhaps this blog post from the editor of the highly regarded "High Country News" will demonstrate what I've been saying, that Durango has become technologically advanced and highly sophisticated, embracing professional and technical occupations and everything that rural mountain towns have to offer for the Middle Class transplants from the Coasts ...

This is very well written -

Jonathan P. Thompson

You may also consider the quantitative reserach of Dr. William Fruth, economist, who ranked Durango as #1 for all small cities (hundreds of them) nationwide, for 2011 -

http://www.durangoherald.com/article...small-but-No-1

I am looking for positive evidence for a town, and prefer not to focus on the negative information. I'm looking for a place as is the OP, and these two links in particular are very encouraging.



JR1

Last edited by JuniperRidge1; 02-15-2012 at 03:14 AM..
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Old 02-15-2012, 08:14 AM
 
Location: SE Portland, OR
1,167 posts, read 2,014,429 times
Reputation: 616
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post
Perhaps this blog post from the editor of the highly regarded "High Country News" will demonstrate what I've been saying, that Durango has become technologically advanced and highly sophisticated, embracing professional and technical occupations and everything that rural mountain towns have to offer for the Middle Class transplants from the Coasts ...

This is very well written -

Jonathan P. Thompson
Those were the conclusions you took away from this blog post? I agree it is well written, but my take is that it shows that Durango is just as confused as the rest of the country, divided down the middle, along party lines. Just because the city paid a lot of money to set up a "comprehensive future plan", that they eventually didn't even use, does not mean they are technologically advanced and sophisticated?

I agree with others that you seem to be piecing together a fantasy Durango from random articles without actually looking at the concrete facts.

Durango is remote.
Durango is small.
Durango has very limited job opportunities (the second article you referenced stated that 33% of the county's economy is tied to mining)
Durango is expensive

I would love to live in Durango, but understand that unless I somehow lined up a job there (which would be virtually impossible in my field as there is no major research companies or University there), there is just no way I'm going to live there.
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Old 02-15-2012, 03:07 PM
 
9,810 posts, read 17,959,034 times
Reputation: 7489
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post
Yes, but obviously not in the rough topography areas that you refer to, where it would be too expensive - along with bus rapid transit to allow affordable transportation to Durango from Santa Fe / Albuuqerque. Already, there's rapid transit running through much of central NM up to Santa Fe.

Growth in Western CO is inevitable, especially in La Plata County, given that many rich, baby boomer retirees and young outdoors enthusiasts, live in overcrowded areas in large US cities with crime and will leave, irregardless of whether or not they end up with a job at Wallmart in Durango, Bend, or wherever.

The economic geography of SW colorado will change with more tellecommuters and custom home builders from the coasts. The complaints of the OP about Connecticut explain why many folks are interested in SW CO.

You can check for papers by Dr Tim Wojan of the USDA about the transformation of the exurban west by way of the creative class young people ages 20-40. Tim Wojan - USDA/ERS Staff Biographical Page

You can also check for info about bus rapid transit and Tellecommunications here from John Niles - Global Telematics: Telecommunications Transportation Travel Telecommuting Transit-Oriented Development Telework

It makes no sense to build such infrastructure to such a small community.

I've heard all the stuff about telecommuters and while some of those people exist, not everyone wants to live in Durango. While I know a lot of independent contractors that work from home, it's been over blown and hyped as though it's some new paradigm where everyone will sit on their butt at home and rake in over $100K a year. Not every job or good/service can be generated from sitting behind a computer at home.

Custom home builders? Dime a dozen in Colorado. Colorado has made a living off of 2nd homes for decades now, but they built so much in the last decade the market has years of supplies of homes. That whole market is pretty dead right now and everyone I talk to, including relatives that work in construction on the western slope of Colorado, that there is no sign or interest in much new construction and probably will not be for 10-20 years, if that. The wealthy baby boomers have already bought what they wanted in rural Colorado and the younger generations don't have the money.

Sounds to me like you are trading in a bunch of theory and that what you need is a real world job and to find out what the real world is really like on the Western Slope in Colorado.
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Old 02-15-2012, 03:24 PM
 
9,810 posts, read 17,959,034 times
Reputation: 7489
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuniperRidge1 View Post
In several posts I suggested Durango as the best moutain town for the OP given their objectives.

Perhaps this blog post from the editor of the highly regarded "High Country News" will demonstrate what I've been saying, that Durango has become technologically advanced and highly sophisticated, embracing professional and technical occupations and everything that rural mountain towns have to offer for the Middle Class transplants from the Coasts ...

This is very well written -

Jonathan P. Thompson

You may also consider the quantitative reserach of Dr. William Fruth, economist, who ranked Durango as #1 for all small cities (hundreds of them) nationwide, for 2011 -

http://www.durangoherald.com/article...small-but-No-1

I am looking for positive evidence for a town, and prefer not to focus on the negative information. I'm looking for a place as is the OP, and these two links in particular are very encouraging.

JR1
I read the first link and didn't find any of it encouraging or informative. What I did find is a rant against citizens that are trying to exercise some fiscal sensibility and responsibility and who don't want to bankrupt the county on "smart growth" or "green corridors".

None of that has anything to do with real world realities, like having a job that pays well or being able to afford a house or what you have to pay in utilities.

When you are actually off Mom and Dad's payroll and living and working in Durango with your technologically advanced and highly sophisticated job, please let us know all about how easy it all is.
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