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Old 02-09-2012, 08:29 PM
 
2 posts, read 7,045 times
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I am a 20 year old college student In Nebraska. I have lived here my whole life, and really want to move out and experience something new (cliche story I know). As of right now I will most likely be moving by myself. I want to live near Denver and maybe find a community college to attend until I can eventually qualify for instate tuition at the University of Colorado, however I'm not emancipated and don't know a whole lot about becoming emancipated. I am very overwhelmed with the whole process of finding friends, a living location, and a job. Any advice is much appreciated! Thanks.
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:03 PM
 
8,318 posts, read 23,744,735 times
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Bad idea. First, you are a Nebraska resident. You can avail yourself of in-state tuition at several different very excellent colleges and universities in Nebraska. For young people today, the absolute best college plan is to obtain the best college education available at the most reasonable cost. Trading your circumstances for higher living costs and most likely out-of-state tuition for at least a year is a bad choice in today's economic environment. Colorado has some good colleges and universities, albeit all of them suffering serious budget woes that are or will impact their ability to offer quality education, but none of them are a bargain at out-of-state tuition rates. I fully expect that , in light of Colorado's higher education budget crisis, both residency requirements will be significantly tightened and out-of-state tuition rates significantly raised. The latter is already happening.

You will have plenty of time to move around and see other places once you are out of college (hopefully with some marketable skills)--in fact, you may HAVE to move somewhere that has a job for you. If you just can't wait with your wanderlust, then consider doing a stint in the military. Plenty of travel, and financial help with college when you get out. Of course, there is that little issue of potentially winding up in a shooting war . . .
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Old 02-10-2012, 12:02 AM
 
52 posts, read 99,093 times
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t.morrison, I have been in your shoes and know what you are feeling like. I am a 21 year old college student at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, CO and has successfully gone through the process of becoming an "emancipated minor" (defined as a person under the age of 22 by the Colorado tuition law) and subsequently gained "in-state" tuition. I can honestly say that the days of a person being able to do this and be able to work their way through college are coming to a close. Here at Colorado State University in-state tuition rates were raised by 20% from last year's tuition rates ($6,978) up to ($8,050) in one year. The budget shortfalls that are occurring here in Colorado are forcing the colleges and universities to make up the difference by raising tuition rates and unlike what many people think, the greatest rate increases are happening on the in-state students as opposed to the out-of-state and graduate students.

I honestly believe that as I near graduation that the window of possibility for taking the year that it takes to prove financial independence (emancipation) and establish your domicile here is slamming shut behind me and that I just barely squeezed through. Jazzlover has the right idea here t.morrison, try to stick it out until you get your degree and then come out here. Colorado will still be here.
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Old 02-10-2012, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Southeastern Colorado
319 posts, read 579,458 times
Reputation: 434
It's not surprising that you would feel overwhelmed by the prospects of such a significant move by yourself. Hopefully you're not in a desperate situation where you need to flee immediately.

Can you start out with any smaller steps? Is there somewhere different you can move to in Nebaska-- like to a larger city than you're from? Or, could you do something different for the summer without breaking all your NE ties at once?

I moved halfway across the country by myself when I was just out of college. I remember thinking that I wanted to go someplace (anyplace!) where I knew at least one person. Lucky for me, one high school friend had already made her way west, so I headed toward Colorado knowing I had a welcoming place to land. I also had the name and phone number of the son of one of my high school teachers, even though I had never met him before.

It makes all the difference if you're not doing everything alone. Do you have a friend or relative (or friend of a relative or relative of a friend?) anywhere in Colorado who can help light your way? Or, are you in a position to come for a visit and check things out before making a big leap?

Denver is not NYC or LA or Chicago, but it's a pretty big place nonetheless -- especially if you come from a small town or rural area. And in my experience of (ahem) many years, it's tough to make good choices from a place of overwhelm...
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,596 posts, read 19,179,896 times
Reputation: 5168
Quote:
Originally Posted by t.morrison View Post
I am a 20 year old college student In Nebraska. I have lived here my whole life, and really want to move out and experience something new (cliche story I know). As of right now I will most likely be moving by myself. I want to live near Denver and maybe find a community college to attend until I can eventually qualify for instate tuition at the University of Colorado, however I'm not emancipated and don't know a whole lot about becoming emancipated. I am very overwhelmed with the whole process of finding friends, a living location, and a job. Any advice is much appreciated! Thanks.
Work on your grades, get into University of Nebraska @ Lincoln, graduate, then move to Denver. There are a ton of Nebraska fans and alumni in CO (unfortunately). Maybe you could use your alumni connections to help find a job?

In the meantime, you're less than a day's drive away, some come and visit on your semester breaks.
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Old 02-10-2012, 09:31 AM
 
9,809 posts, read 17,924,244 times
Reputation: 7488
Quote:
Originally Posted by t.morrison View Post
I am a 20 year old college student In Nebraska. I have lived here my whole life, and really want to move out and experience something new (cliche story I know). As of right now I will most likely be moving by myself. I want to live near Denver and maybe find a community college to attend until I can eventually qualify for instate tuition at the University of Colorado, however I'm not emancipated and don't know a whole lot about becoming emancipated. I am very overwhelmed with the whole process of finding friends, a living location, and a job. Any advice is much appreciated! Thanks.
You are over complicating things. In life you have to prioritize and at 20, people always think things will come easier than they really do.

I was in your same shoes. I wanted Colorado more than anything. But at the time, the most important thing was to get my education and do it in the most affordable way as possible. So I went to my local 4 year university and got my degree. I left school debt free and clear and while my parents helped out, it wasn't a huge burden to them. My instate tuition was $2200 a year in 1997.

Within a year of getting my degree, I was off to Colorado. With my education behind me, I had my piece of paper and didn't have that worry in life anymore and I could focus on other things.

Statistics show that people that interrupt college often end up never finishing it or having to come back to it much later in life. As it is, only about 30% of people that start college actually get a 4 year degree.

Also what kind of work in this economy do you think an unskilled, no degreed 20 year old is going to get in Denver? You'll be lucky to find something that you can earn enough to live on and then working 40 hours a week, how do you find time for school and then afford an education? The only way out will be massive school loans to float you and then you'll be whining at 25 about your punishing school loans hanging like a flaming tire around your neck. Colorado is not a cheap state to go to school in.

If you do want to experience something "new", that is easy to do on your summer break. Get a summer job in Vail or Aspen or Summit County in the tourism business. Plenty of hotels, restaurants and tourist businesses hire for the summer months. You'll be able to enjoy living in the mountains in summer, which most people in Colorado do not do(they live on the prairie) and enjoy that lifestyle for a part of the year without compromising your education.

If you want leads on where to look for summer jobs, let me know in this thread and I will help you out.
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Old 02-10-2012, 11:23 PM
 
2 posts, read 7,045 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
You are over complicating things. In life you have to prioritize and at 20, people always think things will come easier than they really do.

I was in your same shoes. I wanted Colorado more than anything. But at the time, the most important thing was to get my education and do it in the most affordable way as possible. So I went to my local 4 year university and got my degree. I left school debt free and clear and while my parents helped out, it wasn't a huge burden to them. My instate tuition was $2200 a year in 1997.

Within a year of getting my degree, I was off to Colorado. With my education behind me, I had my piece of paper and didn't have that worry in life anymore and I could focus on other things.

Statistics show that people that interrupt college often end up never finishing it or having to come back to it much later in life. As it is, only about 30% of people that start college actually get a 4 year degree.

Also what kind of work in this economy do you think an unskilled, no degreed 20 year old is going to get in Denver? You'll be lucky to find something that you can earn enough to live on and then working 40 hours a week, how do you find time for school and then afford an education? The only way out will be massive school loans to float you and then you'll be whining at 25 about your punishing school loans hanging like a flaming tire around your neck. Colorado is not a cheap state to go to school in.

If you do want to experience something "new", that is easy to do on your summer break. Get a summer job in Vail or Aspen or Summit County in the tourism business. Plenty of hotels, restaurants and tourist businesses hire for the summer months. You'll be able to enjoy living in the mountains in summer, which most people in Colorado do not do(they live on the prairie) and enjoy that lifestyle for a part of the year without compromising your education.

If you want leads on where to look for summer jobs, let me know in this thread and I will help you out.
thank you for your advice, i realize that education is very important and will greatly put that into consideration when making a final decision
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Old 02-11-2012, 11:41 AM
 
11,665 posts, read 22,277,482 times
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I didn't think one could become an in-state resident in any new state if attending college at the same time?
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Old 02-11-2012, 11:49 AM
Status: "Fall is here!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,356 posts, read 90,883,134 times
Reputation: 27946
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I didn't think one could become an in-state resident in any new state if attending college at the same time?
I'm not sure about that. The in-state tuition rules have been posted on this forum many times. It's hard to become "emancipated" if under 22.
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Old 02-12-2012, 04:34 AM
 
Location: relocating
69 posts, read 145,493 times
Reputation: 29
I know someone in the same situation as the OP, and perhaps your dreams are most important to pursue since all of us only have a chance to attend college ONCE - Many possible solutions -

1) Become a resident of the State of Colorado (not that hard).

2) Consider New Mexico since tuition is lower and the two states are similar in some ways and next to each other.

3) Fort Lewis College in Durango offers waivers for out of state tuition for students meeting various criteria.

4) Apply for Federal Financial Aid (FAFSA) and as many scholarships as you can find.
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