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Old 03-11-2012, 10:22 AM
 
Location: SE Portland, OR
1,167 posts, read 2,141,510 times
Reputation: 620

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMan87 View Post
-Bike friendly (where people wont get upset for a bicyclist riding in front of them)
Everyone and their mother has a bike here, and come summer time everyone, their mother, and their grandmother will have a bike out... What bothers me the most are cyclist who ride in the middle of the road to impede traffic... It really bothers me when there are sidewalks right there... Also, cyclist just blow through stop signs and stop lights so make sure your brakes are checked and you are willing to listen to them yell at you on how they have the right of way.. Some of them are brain dead morons.
You might want to check out this website:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicular_cycling

"Lane control
A cyclist is controlling a lane (also known as "taking control of the lane", "taking the lane" or "claiming the lane") when traveling near the center of a marked travel lane. Controlling the lane normally precludes passing within the same lane by drivers of wide motor vehicles, while being positioned near a lane edge usually encourages such passing—even when it is hazardous to bicyclists.
Vehicular cyclists commonly control lanes under the following circumstances:
when approaching a junction at which approaching or waiting traffic may turn or cross directly in front of the cyclist [20]
when there is more than one lane of traffic in the same direction
when there is only one lane of traffic in the relevant direction, but the cyclist is traveling at the normal speed of traffic at that time and place or the marked lane is too narrow to safely share with overtaking traffic
when the lane is too narrow for cyclists to share the lane safely side-by-side with a motor vehicle
when there is a gap in faster same direction traffic (to improve vantage and maneuvering space with respect to noticing and avoiding hazards up ahead, and to increase conspicuousness to traffic approaching from the rear as well as to traffic with potential crossing conflicts up ahead)
when the cyclist is the only traffic moving in that direction at that time and place, regardless of the cyclist's speed
when approaching a place where the lane narrows (such as a construction zone) so as not to be "squeezed out" when that happens
when merging across a roadway in preparation for a turn across the opposing lanes
when overtaking and passing another vehicle, bicyclist moving more slowly
when avoiding hazards
when approaching an intersection or junction at which the cyclist's destination is straight ahead
when approaching or traveling in a roundabout or traffic circle
John Franklin advocates operating bicycles in accordance with the basic rules of the road for vehicle operation. Using the terms "primary riding position" — meaning in the center of the traffic lane — and "secondary riding position" — meaning about 1 meter (3.2 feet) to the side of moving traffic, but not closer than .5 meters (1.6 feet) from the edge of the road — Franklin advocates the primary riding position as the normal position and the secondary riding position only when it is safe, reasonable and necessary to allow faster traffic to pass.[17]
Vehicular cycling, including controlling lanes when appropriate, is supported by traffic laws in most countries (California's Vehicle Code section 21202 is an example of this)."

Also it's incredibly dangerous to ride your bike on the sidewalk in an urban environment. You're almost completely invisible to cars on the street who can very easily turn right into you when you're trying to cross a street from the sidewalk. Not to mention it's illegal in most downtown areas of cities.
"A study of these risks was made in 1994 and showed that sidewalk cycling is almost twice as dangerous as cycling in the street, and cycling against the traffic on the sidewalk is over four times as dangerous as cycling in the street." Is Cycling Dangerous? -- The Risk of Bicycle Use -- Accidents, Fatalities, Injuries, and Benefits

As for running stop signs, yes some cyclists do it. I don't do it, many other cyclists don't do it. In some states like Idaho it's legal for a cyclist to not stop at a stop sign and treat it as a yield. Try not to paint an entire group of people because of the actions of a few. It's equivalent to saying "I saw two cars speeding on the highway today, therefore all drivers are brain dead morons who go way too fast". And if you were to actually hang out at a stop sign for a few minutes and watch, the vast majority of cars don't actually stop either.

Sorry to derail thread, but I thought these statements needed to be addressed.
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Old 03-12-2012, 12:57 AM
 
38 posts, read 64,899 times
Reputation: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMan87 View Post
...
- Nightlife
Honestly, I think the Nightlife sucks here. I would much rather spend an evening out on the town in Buffalo compared to Denver... Ive been to bars where bartenders are just like "I dont want to be here, we are closing at midnight"... Where Buffalo you can drink til 4am at a bar if its just you and your 2 friends. I think Denver, compared to any other major US city, is pretty low on the scale for nightlife.
...
You're entitled to your opinion but studies/surveys say otherwise. Denver consistently ranks in the top 20 best US cities for nightlife year after year. Example:

Travel+Leisure Magazine #12 Denver "America's Best Cities for Nightlife" 2011

I've been to Buffalo and it's not what I'd call a "party" mecca. However, Buffalo does have the 4 am thing going for it. In Denver, bars close at 2 am, not midnight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DMan87 View Post
...I truely miss the amazing lakes and the sports passion...
...I was able to make friends in a heartbeat back in Buffalo (wear the Vanek jersey out after a Sabres game and I would be sitting with a group of 10 people and enjoying the night)...
These comments lead me to assume you're a sports bar type of guy. If true, you're obviously going to feel alienated in a Denver area sports bar wearing anything Buffalo related. Although discouraging, this will always happen when you relocate, especially to the other side of the country. I think you should get out more and REALLY experience what Denver proper has to offer at night. Actually, I find Denver's nightlife a strong point for the city especially LoDo. As I've said, you're entitled to your opinion but I find your harsh criticism a little misleading. I've partied in quite a few major metros across the US and I find Denver's nightlife vibrant and fresh.

Last edited by Dwavies; 03-12-2012 at 01:42 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 03-22-2012, 09:56 AM
 
55 posts, read 140,470 times
Reputation: 27
You've picked the right spot to move for recreational activities. I think Colorado in general (and especially Boulder and Denver) are full of young and energetic people. As a state, it is full of friendly people and welcome newbies so I wouldn't be too worried about meeting people. However, Boulder can be a very expensive city for housing, so looking in the Denver area may be your best bet. In terms of the housing market, I think it's pretty fair amongst the major cities, if not better. Hope this helps and enjoy the CO!
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Old 03-22-2012, 05:32 PM
 
Location: SE Portland, OR
1,167 posts, read 2,141,510 times
Reputation: 620
Quote:
Originally Posted by houseshunter View Post
You've picked the right spot to move for recreational activities. I think Colorado in general (and especially Boulder and Denver) are full of young and energetic people.
No love for the Fort?

But seriously this true. After moving out of CO to Portland, I have been very disappointed with this supposed "mecca" of outdoor activities. There are some great options here, but the people are just not that motivated for outdoor things.

There are way less bike racks on cars, way less people skiing. One thing I that has really struck home for me, is that I've been able to find people to do outdoor things with, but they all only do one or two things, like mtn bike and climb, or ski and road bike, or hike and ski. VERY few people here do a wide variety of outdoor sports. In CO (maybe it was the crowds I ran with), but it seemed like people did EVERYTHING. Everyone had a mountain bike, road bike, climbing gear, backpacking gear, skis (one downhill one backcountry set up), trail running shoes, and a kayak. And they actually did all those things! It's a very unique place where people are diverse in their outdoor activities.
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Old 03-23-2012, 09:52 AM
 
29 posts, read 51,048 times
Reputation: 17
thanks so much for the suggestions everyone!

How long typically does it take to get to the mountains from Denver? Could you bike from Denver to the mountains?

Dman87- Appreciate the recommendations...deffiantly taking a chance on moving without visiting...though figured if I ended up flying out to stay a week, I could instead use that money for 2 months rent or something. Its going to suck to be so far away from family indeed, though I plan on setting up skype to communicate with my family so it wont be as hard. I will also be moving without knowing anyone, though honestly I'm much of a loner, always been pretty independent so I'll be content with not knowing anyone at first...hoping with my outdoor interests I can find some friendly people in CO. Sorry to hear your not diggin Denver so much, though I defiantly need a change of scenery. I was about to move out west last year, though ended up moving to Albany for school in a compromise, but it just reminded me if my hometown cept bigger and filthier...Frankly I need to move out of upstate NY.

househunter/davemess- It never gets old reading about the outdoor recreation CO offers! I cant wait to bike everywhere when I get there! I've read about the tons of paved trails around Denver, sounds like paradise! Its going to be so nice to live in a place that is bike friendly, living with others who share the same passion. Sounds corny, but where I live now, bicyclist are seen somewhat as a deviance lol sometimes feel like a weirdo biking around haha.. also theres hardly anywhere to bike/hike around here..no love for bikers here!

Another question, is there much "Posted" land in CO? Here in NY, much land in the country is flagged with "No trespassing" signs...should I expect the same in CO? Are much of the trails in state parks?
I'm also curious about the abundance of water...lakes/ rivers in around Denver? I understand its not going to be as abundant as in NY, though what should I expect?

I also read that possession of up to an oz of weed is legal in Denver..that was a pleasant surprise, lol! Also I watched a program where the US governement built a "doomsday" shelter in Denver...which makes me think, is CO one of the states least vulnerable to nuke attacks, natural disasters, etc? Makes sense being so far away from the coasts. Lol just a random thought.
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Old 03-23-2012, 09:13 PM
 
Location: SE Portland, OR
1,167 posts, read 2,141,510 times
Reputation: 620
Quote:
Originally Posted by friendlyfire2012 View Post
Another question, is there much "Posted" land in CO? Here in NY, much land in the country is flagged with "No trespassing" signs...should I expect the same in CO? Are much of the trails in state parks?
I'm also curious about the abundance of water...lakes/ rivers in around Denver? I understand its not going to be as abundant as in NY, though what should I expect?
If you look at a map, Colorado has a large percentage of it's land designated as National Parks and National Forests. So yes there is A LOT of public land. Get a Good State Atlas at REI and you'll have a ridiculous amount of info for all the old trails and back roads in the state (and lots of awesome places to camp).

Boulder, surprisingly is one of the worse areas on the front range for Mountain biking on public land. Many of the better trails there are on private property.
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