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Old 03-12-2012, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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jazzlover wrote:
I suspect that crime rates in rural Colorado would be even higher, save for the fact that most bad guys--especially the local ones--know that many rural Colorado property owners have guns and know how to use them. And that, if some low-life is breaking into their property, they are not going to call 911 and hope a deputy that's 40 miles away is going to come to their rescue. Those property owners will probably take matters into their own hands, then call 911. In fact, I've had several county sheriffs in both Colorado and Wyoming give me that exact advice when I lived in rural areas of their jurisdiction. That little "feature" of rural Colorado living may be another little "culture shock" to people from the coasts.
Toting and using a gun is nothing new in Appalachia, but that's rather inland from the actual coast. I was traveling thru a rural area of south western PA shortly after the release of Deliverance...and I had some pretty uncomfortable feelings. Haven't been thru there for almost 40 years, so I have no idea if it's still the backwater that it was back then. I imagine that it is far more civilized today. I'll stop short of making a guarantee that whatever is going on in Colorado is most likley happening somewhere back east as well, but I'd be truly surprised if it wasn't. There's very little, if anything, that is totally unique to Colorado.
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Old 03-12-2012, 04:54 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,120,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
jazzlover wrote:
[i]
Toting and using a gun is nothing new in Appalachia, but that's rather inland from the actual coast. I was traveling thru a rural area of south western PA shortly after the release of Deliverance...and I had some pretty uncomfortable feelings. Haven't been thru there for almost 40 years, so I have no idea if it's still the backwater that it was back then. I imagine that it is far more civilized today. I'll stop short of making a guarantee that whatever is going on in Colorado is most likley happening somewhere back east as well, but I'd be truly surprised if it wasn't. There's very little, if anything, that is totally unique to Colorado.
Well, I've been to rural Pennsylvania, and I would agree that it is probably more similar to rural Colorado in the aspect of people protecting their property. I remember the quote of someone who said that Pennsylvania is Philadelphia and Pittburgh with Alabama in between! Colorado is much the same: The Front Range, and then there's the REAL Colorado--except for the yuppie resorts--they're the least real of all.

Last edited by jazzlover; 03-12-2012 at 05:12 PM..
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Old 03-12-2012, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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The point in all my ranting about the un-uniqueness of Colorado is that the cultural shock issue is not likely to be that big a deal. Granted, there ARE real differneces between Colorado and the coasts, but to me the differences are mostlly with the climate and the environment. The people I've encountered in Colorado are pretty much the same as people I've encountered every where else I've ever lived.
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Old 03-12-2012, 06:06 PM
 
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"I don't really like going clubbing, I prefer the smaller crowed, local bars, smaller concerts and such and I would like to have rather easy access to that."

Somehow I don't think that a woman who's lived in Europe and the East Coast is going to enjoy "local bars" in GJ. And are there concerts, never mind "smaller?" Does that mean smaller than stadium concerts, or wanting a local bandstand in the public park?
I concur with the posters who warn about complacency regarding jobs in health care. I've done a bit of research (for a friend) and I don't think it's there. I don't think OP has a sense of just how small, un-metro, and far from metro GJ is.
Now SLC, that could work. I gather you avoid Provo or is it Orem? if you don't want to be in very serious LDS church country.
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:35 PM
 
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Thanks for all the responses!You can call me crazy but as I said I am not worried about the job part as I can be easily transferred within my company nationwide...I was more interested in seeing what other town/city suggestions I could get from you. The fact that I am from Europe doesn't mean I wouldn't enjoy local bars or a local bandstand in the public park, I'd prefer that to stadium size concerts. I grew up in Europe on a farm in the mountains,lived in London,Prague and small towns as well so I am well aware of what the differences are when it comes to easy access to fun and crazy night life or being close to the outdoors.
If none of you had to worry about jobs, lets say you had a monthly "allowance" and could pick any place (not too expensive/luxurious) town or city in Utah or Colorado what would you pick and why?I'm sure I will get some interesting answers and it will give me some ideas where else I should be looking.Thanks!
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Old 03-13-2012, 10:01 AM
 
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I'd go to Kanab, Utah, for the red rock country, the experience of living so remotely, and to volunteer at Best Friends Animal Society. But I don't think I'd see it as a permanent move.
Colorado? Daydreaming-wise, Ridgway. Maybe not for Jan/Feb. but I think I'd probably set up the same life I have here in the East. I've seen houses out there that I love. I'd adopt animals, volunteer at Second Chance Humane Society at Angel Ridge, lease a horse for the warmer weather, and spend evenings reading and internet posting. Basically the same life I have here with fewer dogs and better access to medical.
So, given the hypothetical situation, I think those are the towns I'd pick, with the understanding that it might not be a rest-of-life decision, especially in older age.
Oh, and I'd consider Durango, for more "town."
I don't ski and would avoid areas where skiing is a motivator, since it can only drive up the cost and un-local feeling of people moving in and out.
It will be interesting to see what other people suggest.
Sorry if I sounded snarky to OP about the size of places, etc. I don't want to sound that way, and it sounds like OP is well aware of the differences in GJ and other places she's lived. Best wishes.
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Old 03-13-2012, 10:42 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,036,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Well, I've been to rural Pennsylvania, and I would agree that it is probably more similar to rural Colorado in the aspect of people protecting their property. I remember the quote of someone who said that Pennsylvania is Philadelphia and Pittburgh with Alabama in between! Colorado is much the same: The Front Range, and then there's the REAL Colorado--except for the yuppie resorts--they're the least real of all.
I've lived in Alabama and central PA is no Alabama I can tell you that.

One thing that has changed with PA since I have been a kid in the 1980's(my family is split half and half with PA and CO for those that haven't figured that out yet) is a lot of infrastructure improvements with 4 lane highways that have opened up a lot of the state. With those modern highways, it is far more efficient and easier to get around this mountainous state than winding along a dangerous and slow 2 lane road. There is some industrial growth here because of that, as well as natural resources being produced. As the oldsters die off from the old steel and coal generations, a lot of younger people are discovering the state for it's cheap real estate and 4 season climate. Pittsburgh is a pretty happenin town these days for instance and a lot of the smaller cities are interesting as well.

But still like in my county(Tioga), there are people that live 30 minutes to an hour just to a paved road, due to the difficult terrain, so you are kinda on your own when it comes to health issues, fire or law enforcement helping you. One man died the other day with a chainsaw cutting down a tree as help was too far away and he bled out before help could arrive. So you have to think about things like that and you can't be careless, many people are so used to help being right there in a city.

Colorado has grown in it's city areas like Denver and some of the resort towns have grown, but much of rural Colorado is no different than it was 30 years ago. There are parts you can be hours from any help and many isolated properties are an hour plus from a town of any size.

There is a reason(s) why people cluster in towns and it's not a bad idea to do so. Knowing what I know I would never live isolated in Colorado, at worst being in one of those 40 acre ranchette developments.
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,465,200 times
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jazzlover wrote:
I remember the quote of someone who said that Pennsylvania is Philadelphia and Pittburgh with Alabama in between!
PA is often referred to as Pennsyltucky!~ My perception of PA is that it more closely resembles Kentucky than Alabama, but it really is quite different than both of those states becasue of it's more northerly location. Like wanneroo mentioned...there are some really isolated places in PA.

To the OP...as for places in Colorado. If money and jobs are not pressing issues, take a look at the places below:

Ouray. It's situated in a tremendously scenic box canyon with snow covered peaks with lots of outdoor activities right out the door. Also has a fantastic hot springs. It's touristy town but not a ski town, and while expensive, it's not as pricey as Aspen, Vail, Telluride and not as plastic as those towns have become.

My absolute favorite town in Colorado is Crested Butte. Once again...fabulous scenery, off the beaten path, and the summers there are absolutely fantastic. The wildflower display is of the knock-your-socks-off variety....almost other-worldly. It is a ski town however, with lots of snow and long, very cold winters, and also on the pricey side, but not as pricey as Vail, Aspen, and Telluride, and it still has some old time flavor remaining...for the time being anyway.

Glenwood Springs-Carbondale is another area to consider. Glenwood has the hot springs, a slightly higher elevation than Grand Junction so it's not quite as hot in the summer, but it still gets pretty hot. Rather touristy too, but tolerable to me at least. Carbondale is a bit farther down the road from Glenwood on the way to Aspen. It too is moderately touristy and more expensive than the front range towns would be, and also more expensive than Grand Junction. A big plus for both Glenwood Springs and Carbondale is the proximity to Aspen. Also, winter in Glenwood-Carbondale is relatively mild. If I could afford to live anywhere I wanted to in Colorado, and didn't have to depend on the local economy to make a living, this area would be at the top of my list. It's a good year round location, whereas Crested Butte would be just a summer place for me.

Though I know very little about these places ( Durango and Salida ), I like what I saw on my brief visits. Both places are very scenic and both towns have hot springs. Durango is way off the beaten path, which makes it a plus for me.

Last edited by CosmicWizard; 03-13-2012 at 11:49 AM..
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Old 03-13-2012, 01:24 PM
 
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If the OP is a wealthy trust-funder, then the choices of where to live in Colorado are pretty wide. But, if an "allowance" means a modest income, then most of the nice places in Colorado will be financially out of reach. There are some affordable towns, but most of them involve significant trade-offs, i.e., not being right in the mountains, being very small with limited culture or services, rigorous or less-than-pleasant climates, etc.

There can be cultural barriers, as well. Most of rural Utah is 80% or more LDS and it can be difficult for a "gentile" (in LDS lexicon, "gentile" is anyone who is not LDS) to assimilate into a community. In many areas of far southern Colorado, communities are often 60%-70% Hispanic or more--most of those people multi-generational natives to the area--and that can be a real culture shock for people who have not lived around that culture before.

Most of those things you won't find out in a cursory visit to a place or by reading the internet. It takes "boots-on-the-ground" research and developing connections and contacts in communities. In that latter group, I don't count as reliable sources the "real estate professionals" (an oxymoron if I ever heard one) who are usually willing to say anything that they think will make a real estate sale.
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Old 03-13-2012, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,913,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
"I don't really like going clubbing, I prefer the smaller crowed, local bars, smaller concerts and such and I would like to have rather easy access to that."

Somehow I don't think that a woman who's lived in Europe and the East Coast is going to enjoy "local bars" in GJ.
I don't know about that. Both the Ale House and Kannah Creek Brewery are cool bars.

To the OP, regarding neighborhoods, look along Patterson Road between 12th st. and 30 Road.
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