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Old 03-14-2012, 09:10 AM
Status: "On Break" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,413 posts, read 91,857,189 times
Reputation: 28071

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
What you fail to consider is that the typical Pennsylvania sheriff's officer probably only has to patrol a few dozen square miles. In Colorado, there are counties where a county sheriff's patrol officer may have to patrol several hundred or even a thousand square miles of territory or more. I suspect that crime rates in rural Colorado would be even higher, save for the fact that most bad guys--especially the local ones--know that many rural Colorado property owners have guns and know how to use them. And that, if some low-life is breaking into their property, they are not going to call 911 and hope a deputy that's 40 miles away is going to come to their rescue. Those property owners will probably take matters into their own hands, then call 911. In fact, I've had several county sheriffs in both Colorado and Wyoming give me that exact advice when I lived in rural areas of their jurisdiction. That little "feature" of rural Colorado living may be another little "culture shock" to people from the coasts.
Baloney! You really need to get out more!

Signed,

Native Pennsylvanian, from that den of iniquity, Pittsburgh!
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Old 03-14-2012, 01:57 PM
 
8,318 posts, read 23,927,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Baloney! You really need to get out more!

Signed,

Native Pennsylvanian, from that den of iniquity, Pittsburgh!
Well, considering that statement of mine you bolded is pretty much a direct quote from a Colorado sherrif's deputy that used to work as a sheriff's deputy in a rural Pennsylvania county, I stand by my comment. He allowed that coming to work in a rural Colorado county where he does have to patrol several hundred square miles was quite a shock compared to what he was used to "back East."
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Old 03-14-2012, 02:20 PM
Status: "On Break" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,413 posts, read 91,857,189 times
Reputation: 28071
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Well, considering that statement of mine you bolded is pretty much a direct quote from a Colorado sherrif's deputy that used to work as a sheriff's deputy in a rural Pennsylvania county, I stand by my comment. He allowed that coming to work in a rural Colorado county where he does have to patrol several hundred square miles was quite a shock compared to what he was used to "back East."
That may have been his experience, but it is not necessarily typical. Most Pennsylvanians are also aware that Pennsylvania does not have a seacoast.
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Old 03-14-2012, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,735 posts, read 15,717,430 times
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The closest thing to a seacoast would be Lake Erie, and Lake Erie ain't no ocean. Isn't Lake Erie the one that caught fire over on the Cleveland end of the lake a few years back?
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Old 03-14-2012, 04:00 PM
 
11,774 posts, read 22,528,605 times
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No, that was the Cuyogha (sp) River right in Cleveland, and I think it was some 35 years ago.
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Old 03-14-2012, 04:07 PM
 
8,318 posts, read 23,927,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Most Pennsylvanians are also aware that Pennsylvania does not have a seacoast.
But my Dad did sail a medium-sized seagoing Navy ship up the Delaware River to port in Philadelphia during WWII . . . And my Mother did live in Philly for about a year-and-a-half while my Dad was fighting Germans in the Med (Mediterranean Sea, that is) in such garden spots such as North Africa, Sicily, Elba, Naples, and southern France.

My late Mom certainly said that there is a big difference between Colorado or Utah and the East Coast. 'nuff said.
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Old 03-14-2012, 04:30 PM
Status: "On Break" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,413 posts, read 91,857,189 times
Reputation: 28071
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
But my Dad did sail a medium-sized seagoing Navy ship up the Delaware River to port in Philadelphia during WWII . . . And my Mother did live in Philly for about a year-and-a-half while my Dad was fighting Germans in the Med (Mediterranean Sea, that is) in such garden spots such as North Africa, Sicily, Elba, Naples, and southern France.

My late Mom certainly said that there is a big difference between Colorado or Utah and the East Coast. 'nuff said.
Different, but neither better nor worse.

My parents were in WW II as well. Don't know what that has to do with anything.
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Old 03-14-2012, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, NY
6,751 posts, read 5,557,113 times
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Anecdotal evidence is not always the most reliable Jazzlover. You must have learned that in your many years.
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Old 03-14-2012, 07:28 PM
 
15,470 posts, read 18,762,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Be worried about "getting a job set up" before relocating. Jobs are rough to get in Grand Junction--don't let anyone kid you about that. That is, unless you want to work in the gas fields. $700-$900 won't get you much more than an apartment or modest house in Grand Junction, either. There is very little "culture" in Grand Junction, save a little bit of stuff going on at the college or the theater downtown. Otherwise, it's the bar scene, which isn't that great. Grand Junction itself gets hot in the summer, but gets cold with relatively little snow in the winter. Grand Junction sits in a valley where it can get serious air inversions in the winter that can trap pollutants for days and days on end--especially if there is any snowcover.

Salt Lake City is a major city compared with Grand Junction, with all of both the problems and opportunities that a major metro area offers. If wintertime air pollution can be called bad in Grand Junction, it's off-the-charts awful in Salt Lake City. The same climate and weather patterns that cause inversions are present in both places, but the Wasatch Front's high population just makes that much more pollution to be trapped. The Wasatch Front air pollution problem essentially extends from Provo to Ogden, so being on the "outskirts" doesn't really offer an escape from it.



On the plus side for SLC, there is probably no major city in the US with immediate access to some of the most splendid mountain country anywhere. For many, that alone overrides issues with air pollution, the church, etc. and attracts a lot of people to the area.

If I had to live in a major metro area (and I loathe cities), I would choose SLC over the Front Range metro areas of Colorado in a heartbeat. Grand Junction is a much smaller community, but it, unfortunately, has grown to the point that--to quote a friend who works there--has reached the size where it has many of the problems of a larger metro area with few of the amenities. For a person coming from the East Coast, either would likely be a big culture shock.
Thought I'd get this thread back on topic with a couple comments on Salt Lake City as I was just there last week.

I agree with jazz on a number of observations; the air IS bad from late October to late February/early March. There IS a Mormon influence in the city but not anything like you see in the smaller areas.

Weather wise Salt lake has had an average to below average winter. But don't think it can't dump a storm like the whopper Denver got not long ago. I remember one storm in the early 90's where they got three feet of snow in a day and a half. They're prepared though and they're state highway road crews, like Colorado's, do a good job. I don't know quite how their economy stacks up against Denver, but I know how it stacks up against Grand Junction(noticed the OP has questions about GJ) In today's Grand Junction's The Daily Sentinel, the headline stated that Mesa County is now sitting at 9.6% unemployment. I've opined in several other Grand Junction related threads here on City Data regarding the local work situation, so I won't here.

For me, there are various advantages to going to Salt Lake other than just visiting friends in Tooele, west of Salt Lake. I saved $133 by driving to my friends house to have a mobile windshield outfit put a new windshield in my Buick as opposed to Grand Junctions company. The tall man shop shut down in GJ a couple years ago and I go to Salt Lake to buy clothes. Also picked up a real nice turntable at one of the stereo shops and shopped at some other businesses, businesses that the GJ area doesn't have. That part of the big city life style has appeal.

What does NOT have appeal is driving to Denver in the winter and putting up with all the crazies who flip you off if you're not doing the speed limit. I ought to know, I've been on I-70 probably 200 times in my travels, maybe more. I live 18 miles closer to Salt Lake, the tax rate is a little cheaper, the drive is less hectic. With the exception of Red Rocks Amphitheater, I enjoy going to concerts more in Salt Lake, prices overall are cheaper.

Two, maybe three years before the 2002 Olympics came to Salt Lake, they went on a full scale highway project, overhauling all the interstates and major highways. But IMO, truth be told, I never had any problems getting around town anyway. One quick item I'll add, I never saw gang graffiti on any of the highway viaducts, off ramps, or street signs till the late 90's.
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Old 03-14-2012, 08:40 PM
 
11,774 posts, read 22,528,605 times
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Back to PA's waterfront- my mother grew up on the waterfront, when it was *not* a nice place to live, and her father died unloading stuff on the docks. But yes, the waterfront is the river, not the ocean. For that, you have to get in line and shove your way east to the Jersey Shore.
Back to regular programming.
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