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Old 09-12-2007, 12:43 PM
 
Location: California
66 posts, read 379,540 times
Reputation: 35

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I'm doing my home work on Colorado for my mother in law. I was reading about the weather on different sites and found that Colorado ranked amongst the states with higher lightning related deaths. I think Georgia and Flordia were the highest and then Colorado. What can you tell me about this? Are there certain areas of the state that have more storms than others? Is this even an issue that is talked about a lot in the news there? Should I be concerned? If you reply will you tell me what are you are in?
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Old 09-12-2007, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,565,650 times
Reputation: 216
Yes I understand we do. No it does not concern me. Lived here all my life. No, I don't think it is much of an issue, not that I am aware of. I know what to do when lightening is striking. Have seen results but never have known anyone personal that has been struck. Read about them. If I am riding in the high country, I make sure I drop down before it starts. Might loose my horse if I didn't. They know when there is electricity in the air and I listen to them. Scary when it hit in craters up high. It is a common there and sparks do fly and many forest fires are caused by lightening. When the kids are on ball fields etc. we stop the games and get them into cars and shelter. At least if one has any sense, they do. I live on eastern slope, central, southern against the mts at about 5,400 ft. now. But I have lived in Pueblo which is farther into the plains and in the mountains in different areas. 8 to 11,000 feet. Other acts of nature frighten me more. Probably because I have not directly had to deal. Like floods, tornatoes etc. We all are more frightened of things we don't know.
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Old 09-12-2007, 02:58 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Yes, lightning strikes make the news. Yes, I have read/heard about people being killed and/or injured by lightning. A neighbor received an indirect hit one time in the mtns. HIs knees hurt afterwards. Later, he was hiking in Rocky Mtn Nat. Park, and he collapsed in severe pain. Turns out, his quad muscle had detached from the bone and had to be reattached. He had a tough rehab, but is fine now.
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Old 09-12-2007, 05:03 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,862,201 times
Reputation: 9139
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Girl View Post
I'm doing my home work on Colorado for my mother in law. I was reading about the weather on different sites and found that Colorado ranked amongst the states with higher lightning related deaths. I think Georgia and Flordia were the highest and then Colorado. What can you tell me about this? Are there certain areas of the state that have more storms than others? Is this even an issue that is talked about a lot in the news there? Should I be concerned? If you reply will you tell me what are you are in?
This website NWS Pueblo Lightning Page should give you most of the information you need. The lightning frequency and density maps are good to show the most lightning-prone areas of the state. All of Colorado can get thunderstorms in the summer. In some mountain and foothill locales, they are almost a daily occurrence in June, July, and August. The most thunderstorm-prone area in the state is around the Palmer Divide north of Colorado Springs, extending southward and including Colorado Springs itself. South of Trinidad is a very storm-prone area and the area on the eastern slope of the Sangre de Cristo mountains in northern New Mexico is one of more storm-prone areas outside of Florida. Remember, too, that Florida can get thunderstorms year-round. Colorado gets all but a few of its thunderstorms from late April through September, with most in June, July, and August.

Northwestern Colorado is probably the least thunderstormstorm-prone area in the state. The valleys in west-central Colorado and the San Luis Valley are also less storm-prone; however, the mountains surrounding both of those areas can get frequent storms in the summer.

Lightning is indeed a killer in Colorado. Hikers who get caught by storms on the higher peaks in the summer are especially vulnerable, but caution should be exercised by anyone who is outdoors when storms are near. I have been studying and photographing lightning for many years, but I am very cautious in how I do it. One of my ex-wife's relatives was killed by lightning in the eastern slope foothills some years ago. He really wasn't doing anything dangerous--he just happened to be outside at the wrong place at the wrong time.

For those from California, one of the least lightning and thunderstorm-prone places in the country, the storms in Cplorado can be very unnerving. Lightning is not the only threat. The Front Range of Colorado, extending eastward and northward into Wyoming, South Dakota, Kansas and Nebraska is in "Hail Alley." "Big" hail (golfball-size or bigger) occurs with some regularity somewhere (usually in multiple places over the summer) in Hail Alley every year. Denver had a devastating hailstorm in 1990 that, at the time, was the second most expensive natural disaster in U.S. history. Cheyenne, Wyoming is considered the "Hail Capital" of the U.S., getting an average of 10 hailstorms every year.

Make no mistake, Colorado weather can be lovely, but it is NOT benign--there is nothing "precious" or "cute" about it.
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Old 09-12-2007, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 83,027,501 times
Reputation: 17516
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Girl View Post
I'm doing my home work on Colorado for my mother in law. I was reading about the weather on different sites and found that Colorado ranked amongst the states with higher lightning related deaths. I think Georgia and Flordia were the highest and then Colorado. What can you tell me about this? Are there certain areas of the state that have more storms than others? Is this even an issue that is talked about a lot in the news there? Should I be concerned? If you reply will you tell me what are you are in?
They say the most dangerous part about flying is driving to the airport.

Lightning in Colorado has a similiar corollary.

The most dangerous part about lightning in Colorado is getting bitten by somebody's dog while seeking shelter.
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Old 09-12-2007, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 83,027,501 times
Reputation: 17516
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Girl View Post
I'm doing my home work on Colorado for my mother in law. I was reading about the weather on different sites and found that Colorado ranked amongst the states with higher lightning related deaths. I think Georgia and Flordia were the highest and then Colorado. What can you tell me about this? Are there certain areas of the state that have more storms than others? Is this even an issue that is talked about a lot in the news there? Should I be concerned? If you reply will you tell me what are you are in?
They say the most dangerous part about flying is driving to the airport.

Lightning in Colorado has a similiar corollary.

The most dangerous part about lightning in Colorado is getting bitten by somebody's dog while seeking shelter.
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Old 09-12-2007, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Colorado
346 posts, read 1,443,690 times
Reputation: 261
A little off-topic, but do you get severe shocks every time you touch metal in a grocery store? Either I have tons of electricity in my body or our local Vons has an unusual supply of it! I can't tell you how many times I've nearly cursed in the frozen food aisle or dropped a can of cat food because of being zapped. Just wondering if the aridness and frequent lightning make this a common occurrence in your stores as well. I hate getting shocks!
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Old 09-12-2007, 06:53 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebagirl View Post
A little off-topic, but do you get severe shocks every time you touch metal in a grocery store? Either I have tons of electricity in my body or our local Vons has an unusual supply of it! I can't tell you how many times I've nearly cursed in the frozen food aisle or dropped a can of cat food because of being zapped. Just wondering if the aridness and frequent lightning make this a common occurrence in your stores as well. I hate getting shocks!
Yes, that happens to me a lot!
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Old 09-12-2007, 08:27 PM
 
1,571 posts, read 2,837,760 times
Reputation: 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebagirl View Post
A little off-topic, but do you get severe shocks every time you touch metal in a grocery store? Either I have tons of electricity in my body or our local Vons has an unusual supply of it! I can't tell you how many times I've nearly cursed in the frozen food aisle or dropped a can of cat food because of being zapped. Just wondering if the aridness and frequent lightning make this a common occurrence in your stores as well. I hate getting shocks!
It's static electricity caused by the dry air. Here in humid PA we only get on cold winter days when the heat dries out the air. BTW, lightning is a huge static dischrage.
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Old 09-13-2007, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,565,650 times
Reputation: 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Yes, that happens to me a lot!
Yep, me too. More than my hubby tho. Wonder why?
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