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Old 03-27-2012, 06:51 PM
 
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Thanks for the combined threads and for the "sticky" Mike! This looks to be an active thread for an active fire season, as sad as it is to say.

Latest count for the Lower North Fork Fire (about 25 miles southwest of Denver) from what I've seen online and the tv news sources:

4500 acres burned.

Over 6000 people have been advised to evacuate.

Two people dead.

 
Old 03-27-2012, 07:26 PM
 
Location: CO
2,540 posts, read 5,837,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
It's been dry all winter and it's still dry, with no rain in sight.

2012 could be a very bad year for Colorado forests and grass lands, and much of the nation is fairly dry.

We've merged a few new threads into this one thread where all fire topics are to be posted, regardless of where they are in COLO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBLE H View Post
Thanks for the combined threads and for the "sticky" Mike! This looks to be an active thread for an active fire season, as sad as it is to say.

Latest count for the Lower North Fork Fire (about 25 miles southwest of Denver) from what I've seen online and the tv news sources:

4500 acres burned.

Over 6000 people have been advised to evacuate.

Two people dead.
Sad to say - folks often post they like four seasons.

Unfortunately, here in Colorado, besides winter, spring, summer and fall, we also have fire season.
 
Old 03-27-2012, 10:11 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,860,553 times
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Wink So far

It can be surprising how many residences are built back in these forests. With 2,500 homes evacuated, another 6,500 are advised to be prepared to do so.

With this Lower North Fork Fire zero percent contained, the sheriff's spokesperson tells 9News that their priority is not in containing this fire already having burned 4,500 acres, but in every instance with any structure threatened, although 23 already affected.

Word has it that the Colorado Forest Service started this fire as a controlled burn. If spring traditionally a good time for such activities, one might wonder what they were thinking given the conditions this year.

Two fatalities so far, and a third person missing.

One week since the official end of winter.
 
Old 03-28-2012, 09:32 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,183,346 times
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Well, the fingers of blame are already being pointed everywhere--except where they should be. The simple facts are this: the fire that is burning is a result of a very dry winter colliding with about a century of fire suppression, much of that suppression in the last 30-50 years made necessary by residential structures being built in places where they should have never been permitted. The result we see is two deaths, a bunch of homes destroyed, thousands of people evacuated--and a huge expenditure of taxpayer money in what may be an ineffective attempt to protect a bunch of man-made crap built in the wrong place. The fingers of blame will be pointed at whomever or whatever ignited the fire--be that from a controlled burn or other source, but the fact is that the forest was prime to burn and, sooner or later, would certainly find an ignition source, be that man-caused or natural.

I fully understand the allure of living in the mountains in a pretty forest. I know the area where the fire is burning today quite well--I spent a lot of time in that area in my younger days. But there is a substantial risk that anyone living in that environment takes--and a fire like this is one of them. People should understand that risk going in, and be willing to accept the consequences, unpleasant as those are. And those risks should not be socialized upon the rest of the taxpayers.

Finally, I think there is still a lot of denial in the greater public about the perilous conditions of Colorado forests. Millions of acres of Colorado forest are prime to burn and there is very little that man can do about it. When one of those forests finds an ignition source in dry conditions like we have now, it is going to go. And the man-made stuff in the way of it is going to go, too. There is virtually no forested area in the mountains of Colorado where "it can't happen here" is a valid statement. People who live in those forested locales should be emotionally, financially, and physically prepared for the distinct possibility of losing their home at some point to a wildfire. If they're not, they should be re-thinking the decision about where they are living. Same thing for people dreaming about living in such places.
 
Old 03-28-2012, 10:12 AM
 
Location: playing in the colorful Colorado dirt
4,486 posts, read 4,346,469 times
Reputation: 6938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
It can be surprising how many residences are built back in these forests. With 2,500 homes evacuated, another 6,500 are advised to be prepared to do so.

With this Lower North Fork Fire zero percent contained, the sheriff's spokesperson tells 9News that their priority is not in containing this fire already having burned 4,500 acres, but in every instance with any structure threatened, although 23 already affected.

Word has it that the Colorado Forest Service started this fire as a controlled burn. If spring traditionally a good time for such activities, one might wonder what they were thinking given the conditions this year.

Two fatalities so far, and a third person missing.

One week since the official end of winter.
There is no such thing as a controlled burn, only a fire that you hope you can handle.

Once again, the arrogance of man has come back to bite him.
 
Old 03-28-2012, 10:32 AM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,628,549 times
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Default Forest Service Liability

With the insurance being capped at $600K do you think there will be lawsuits against the Forest Service for their incompetence?
(they were responsible for the fire)
 
Old 03-28-2012, 11:29 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,183,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by proveick View Post
With the insurance being capped at $600K do you think there will be lawsuits against the Forest Service for their incompetence?
(they were responsible for the fire)
I don't think that it has been firmly established that the Colorado State Forest Service was responsible for igniting the fire. Whether they are responsible or not, there will be lawsuits. People are always looking for someone else to blame for whatever happens. Whether such lawsuits would be successful is another matter.

The analogy for the situation of living in a fire-prone area is this:

You put on dark clothing and wander out into the middle of a busy 75 mph multi-lane highway in the middle of the night--and stand there for hours. You get hit and killed by a bus. Is the bus driver somewhat culpable? Maybe, but it was really stupid and dangerous for you to wander out in the middle of busy highway in dark clothing in the middle of the night, now wasn't it? Should the responsibility of that be charged to the bus driver? The bus company? The taxpayers? Or you?
 
Old 03-28-2012, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,497,453 times
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Like it or not, we're ALL going to pay for it in one way or another.
 
Old 03-28-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: playing in the colorful Colorado dirt
4,486 posts, read 4,346,469 times
Reputation: 6938
Quote:
Originally Posted by proveick View Post
With the insurance being capped at $600K do you think there will be lawsuits against the Forest Service for their incompetence?
(they were responsible for the fire)
If this was started by the Forestry Service, yes they should be held liable.

Considering the current conditions in this area, dry and extremely windy, it wasn't the brightest idea to have a "controlled" burn.

Even with just a light breeze a fire can spread rapidly. I've seen it happen. A couple of years ago our neighbor was target shooting and hit a steel drum with a bullet. One spark and within a couple of minutes, two acres of our south field was on fire.

People just don't realize how fast things like this can happen.
 
Old 03-28-2012, 11:45 AM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,628,549 times
Reputation: 1923
I anticipate lots of class 3 fire restrictions this summer. Campgrounds will be taking a hit.
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