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Old 07-08-2012, 09:52 PM
 
Location: on a hill
346 posts, read 340,417 times
Reputation: 454

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3.25 " in the rain gauge in the Laramie Foothills over the last three days!.The High Park fire is history, thank God. This moisture should buy us some time for at least a month. Ain't over yet though. The NOAA says we're in for record heat and dryness for the rest of the summer. Pray for more of what we just enjoyed anyway!!

 
Old 07-11-2012, 07:37 AM
 
15,382 posts, read 18,553,246 times
Reputation: 44512
Only a small fire for now, but is still worth mentioning. A small fire has been reported by KKCO11 News. Called the Bull Basin fire, it is approximately one mile away from the town of Molina on private land. So far it is at 20 acres.
 
Old 07-12-2012, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,079 posts, read 15,762,649 times
Reputation: 7679
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Mudslides and flash flooding in the Poudre Canyon have closed Highway 14 at Ted's Place.

Folks who didn't lose houses to the fire could still conceivably lose them to its aftermath.

Mudslides, flash flooding closes Colorado Highway 14 at Ted's Place - The Denver Post

Rist Canyon Road was closed in several places too and a creek backed up in Bellvue and flooded a couple of houses. An irrigation canal also got clogged with debris and washed over a couple of houses south of Bellvue.

But, the heavy rains the other day washed out a good bit of the ash and debris. The danger isn't over yet, but it's better than it was on the day you posted this. Still, though, it's pretty bad. The burn over up Whale Rock Rd and in Glacier Park is as bad as I've seen.
 
Old 07-13-2012, 12:10 PM
 
Location: West Paris
10,262 posts, read 9,266,097 times
Reputation: 24353
I only can say you :god bless you.The climate is crazy
 
Old 07-16-2012, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,420 posts, read 3,390,276 times
Reputation: 825
And with those big rains comes the demise of river & lake ecosystems...
 
Old 07-16-2012, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,079 posts, read 15,762,649 times
Reputation: 7679
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shuffler View Post
And with those big rains comes the demise of river & lake ecosystems...

No, it won't cause their demise. It's natural and necessary.
 
Old 07-17-2012, 08:31 AM
 
8,318 posts, read 23,752,451 times
Reputation: 8954
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
No, it won't cause their demise. It's natural and necessary.
There can be serious bank erosion and stream siltation after large fires. While it is indeed natural, it can destroy things like fisheries for years. On the human side of things, a large-scale fire that causes stream siltation can render a watercourse practically useless for domestic water for at least a year or more. I wonder how the Front Range metroplexes will feel about that when a megafire roars through the watersheds up in Summit County or on the upper Platte . . .
 
Old 07-17-2012, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
11,847 posts, read 18,876,915 times
Reputation: 3960
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
There can be serious bank erosion and stream siltation after large fires. While it is indeed natural, it can destroy things like fisheries for years. On the human side of things, a large-scale fire that causes stream siltation can render a watercourse practically useless for domestic water for at least a year or more. I wonder how the Front Range metroplexes will feel about that when a megafire roars through the watersheds up in Summit County or on the upper Platte . . .
They will figure something out like they always do. Pueblo, Colorado Springs and Denver have been a city for over 100 years now and in that time they have encountered many different issues that major cities face and this would be no different.
 
Old 07-17-2012, 01:00 PM
 
11,669 posts, read 22,288,028 times
Reputation: 14866
One hundred years isn't exactly a long-term look when it comes to geology and habitat and all, plus, those three cities were hardly the sizes that they are now, even in a mere one hundred years.
Saw a "severe drought" map today and while the severe areas were primarily across the Southwest, the whole state of Colorado was at the epicenter of the severe area.
 
Old 07-17-2012, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,725 posts, read 15,604,834 times
Reputation: 9166
Josseppie wrote: They will figure something out like they always do. Pueblo, Colorado Springs and Denver have been a city for over 100 years now and in that time they have encountered many different issues that major cities face and this would be no different.

Of course they'll figure something out like they always do, BUT it'll cause some major inconvenience to put it mildly, and the cost is likley to be rather steep. Life as usual won't be so usual.
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