U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 03-26-2012, 06:56 PM
 
254 posts, read 411,854 times
Reputation: 189

Advertisements

So, I'm sitting inside the house (in Douglas County) and the fire in Jefferson County smells like it's a bit too close to home. Fire in Jeffco foothills doubles to 200 acres; evacuations underway - The Denver Post

I feel bad for the evacuees and wonder if anyone is concerned that our 20+ degree above average temps, high winds, and driest March on record are going to result in a dangerous spring/summer? I love the warm weather, but hope these latest fires are not a sign of things to come....

 
Old 03-26-2012, 07:21 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,112 posts, read 18,707,927 times
Reputation: 20404
Live in the city.
This does not happen.
 
Old 03-26-2012, 07:35 PM
 
254 posts, read 411,854 times
Reputation: 189
You're trolling... Living in the city does not result in improved air quality. Google "Denver's brown cloud" for a discussion on that topic. The temperature, precipitation, and wind speed is generally not significantly different in the city than in JeffCo. The Post writes "Smoke from the blaze can be seen from downtown Denver, which only complicated a blowing dust air quality advisory issued earlier in the day by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment."
 
Old 03-26-2012, 08:53 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,112 posts, read 18,707,927 times
Reputation: 20404
Default What do wildfires have to do with air quality

Quote:
Originally Posted by MountainK View Post
Living in the city does not result in improved air quality. Google "Denver's brown cloud" for a discussion on that topic.
Who is writing about "air quality". Your original post was people being evacuated because of a wild fire.
My point was/is: we don't have wild fires within the City & County of Denver.
My point was/is: live in the city and you won't worry about wild fires.
 
Old 03-26-2012, 09:06 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Who is writing about "air quality". Your original post was people being evacuated because of a wild fire.
My point was/is: we don't have wild fires within the City & County of Denver.
My point was/is: live in the city and you won't worry about wild fires.
You will worry plenty about the effects of wildfire on Denver proper if a megafire hits one of the major watersheds that supplies Denver with water. The silt and ash from the Hayman fire raised hell with the Marston water treatment plant that supplies a good chunk of Denver's water--and that fire, while huge, only was a glancing blow to the watershed. If a megafire ripped through, say, a large chunk of the Blue River watershed around Dillon (all very disease and fire-prone lodgepole forest), there would be a strong possibility that a good chunk of Denver's water supply could be compromised. The truly nightmarish scenario would be if several large fires burned simultaneously in both the South Platte and upper Colorado River watersheds (not beyond the realm of possibility with the beetle-kill of hundreds of thousands of acres of lodgepole that has already occurred). In a word, Denver's water supply could be ****ed in that scenario. Think about it the next time you turn on the tap.
 
Old 03-27-2012, 03:31 PM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,473,188 times
Reputation: 18835
Default Wildfire SW Denver

I just read about a big wildfire, I believe in the area of "densely populated southwest of Denver." Is this a lodgepole dead tree area, or near it?
 
Old 03-27-2012, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
Reputation: 9287
This article might answer some of your questions
 
Old 03-27-2012, 04:01 PM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
11,207 posts, read 7,228,641 times
Reputation: 8015
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I just read about a big wildfire, I believe in the area of "densely populated southwest of Denver." Is this a lodgepole dead tree area, or near it?
Even if it wasn't a lodgepole dead tree area this place was ready to go up. No moisture whatsoever in the month of March. I don't live too far from the fire. I am not in any danger but we are getting the brunt of the smoke.
 
Old 03-27-2012, 04:06 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I just read about a big wildfire, I believe in the area of "densely populated southwest of Denver." Is this a lodgepole dead tree area, or near it?
No, this area is mostly ponderosa pine (also susceptible to beetle kill) and mountain mahogany. Both can burn furiously when they are dry enough. This is damned early for all of this to start--without moisture, May and June could be really rip-roaring. It's likely that, by then, the focus will shift to west-central and southwestern Colorado. Typically the Front Range and Eastern Plains come under the influence of the westward expansion of the Bermuda High, and will start to get influxes of moister air from the Gulf of Mexico by mid-May and through June. However, western and southwestern Colorado typically do not get much of that until early to mid-July, when the Southwest Monsoon fetches moisture from both the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of California and brings it northward--with that influx usually lasting through around mid- to late August.

Of course, all of that assumes a normal year, which this year, so far, has been anything but. If the spring moisture fails to move into the Front Range normally, then the table is set for a savage fire season there. Similarly, if the Southwest Monsoon is late or weak, southern and western Colorado could be in the bull's eye.

One final note: From what I've read, most of the fires burning in Jefferson County have not been "crowning out"--that is, they are burning small trees, bushes, grasses, and underbrush. From a natural perspective, that is exactly the kind of fire you want to have if you're going to have one, since it replenishes soil nutrients, spares the large trees, and burns up the undergrowth of brush that allows a fire to "ladder up" and lets a fire "crown out." All well and good, except that these otherwise beneficial fires can easily burn houses and kill people who are in their path. A case where building in a stupid, bad place has disastrous results from what otherwise would be benign and beneficial fire.
 
Old 03-27-2012, 05:39 PM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,790,850 times
Reputation: 18081
It's been dry all winter and it's still dry, with no rain in sight.

2012 could be a very bad year for Colorado forests and grass lands, and much of the nation is fairly dry.

We've merged a few new threads into this one thread where all fire topics are to be posted, regardless of where they are in COLO.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top