U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Unread 04-17-2012, 08:53 AM
 
552 posts, read 456,225 times
Reputation: 1221
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
100 years ago there could been someone like Jazz complaining about all the CO transplants moving in to So Cal, in many cases for the better weather but also for jobs.
The net in-migration CA has experienced so far exceeds that of CO, and it comes from so many US states and foreign countries, what CO has experienced in terms of growth and population growth is a mere blip. It's like the difference between having one bomb vs. 2500 bombs hit your front yard. Neither is what you'd necessarily want, but there's such a difference in scale as to be nowhere near the same experience. To give some context, I read an article recently that the population of LA has increased by some 3 - 3.5 million in the last 15 years. In other words, a city the size of Denver has MOVED into Los Angeles, which was already monstrous to begin with. I suspect most Angelenos barely even noticed.

Bitter local curmudgeons in CA don't really have a focal point on which they can focus their anger/frustration. In CO, it's a bit easier to identify your (perceived) enemies/culprits ... those trying to escape the carnage caused by the first paragraph above to quality of life. As "bad" as the quality of life has become in CO, I still thank God DAILY I am here rather than there, with a fair shot at a "normal" American dream, healthy intact family etc. Bitter local curmudgeons who prefered the 1950's do not bother me one bit, so long as they keep their guns in a locked cabinet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 04-17-2012, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Southeastern Colorado
305 posts, read 272,972 times
Reputation: 381
Thanks, jazz, for the "easy answer" re: relative lack of tornadic activity in the eastern part of the state. Great info (as always), sans even a hint of the curmudgeon. Could there be an old softie lurking in there somewhere?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 04-17-2012, 09:50 AM
 
9,652 posts, read 12,106,179 times
Reputation: 9176
Don't bet on it about Jazz!
I didn't know there was an Index of Key Threads. Is that like a Pulitzer on C-D? If so, then you might as well retire Jazz's jersey number.
I was working in TV news on the East Coast when the 1976 flood happened, and I remember its coverage with a shudder, being a dumb East Coaster who had camped out at the Grand Canyon when a teenager- certainly would have been as unknowing as those people were.
When I drove across New Mexico (Tucumcari to Las Vegas, the back road) I saw almost no people or signs of people existing for two hours. I thought I was on the moon. There were occasional signs for "flash flood area" and I believed them, although didn't get *at all* how there could be a flood in such a place.
I think extreme natural elements- floods, ocean, big mountains, and so on- really affect how a person grows up. It's like there's something bigger than you, to be learned and respected, and there's more to knowing your way around than knowing how to get a good parking space.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 04-27-2012, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Southeastern Colorado
305 posts, read 272,972 times
Reputation: 381
Default FollowUp On Tornadic Activity in SE Colorado

Since this topic came up recently in this thread, thought I would post this morning's breaking news:

Tornadoes Touch Down In Southeast Colorado
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 04-27-2012, 09:22 PM
 
2,002 posts, read 1,777,983 times
Reputation: 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
This question from prospective transplants comes up so often that I thought I would write a comprehensive post about it (and, for those who do not know, I am an amateur climatologist who has studied Western climate for over 40 years).

....
Well, I have not studied weather for 40 years---but from living in CO for 3 years [boulder/longmont], and CA for a total of 12-both sfo and so cal-which in themselves are nothing alike, climate wise, except perhaps 'mild' relative to other locations], I can tell you that CA and CO are nothing alike, weather wise. AT all.

I don't even know why prospective residents would not already know this, assuming they live in the year 2012 and have access to information.....

CO is brown, dry, at altitude, did I mention dry??? And WINDY. Sun is 20% stronger due to altitude, and that's just in Denver/Boulder-stronger as you go up. Summers are still HOT, unless at very high altitude. Winters are mild as far as winters go, but still blustery enough to have to deal with [vs. much of coastal CA].

In a nutshell, if you need moisture, and like green and trees, dislike wind and flat plains (or particularly cold winters if living in the mountains for the 'view' and trees), you will not like CO weather.

If you are in CO and want to know what CA weather is like....as Louis Black puts it, 'San Diego weatherman-easiest job in the world. What's the weather for the week? Nice. Now back to you, Bob.'

Obviously, as jazzlover has illustrated, CA in itself is very diverse, climate wise. But most of the areas you'd want to move to, will be very easy to acclimate, biologically speaking. You may miss the mountains, the seasons, the dry air, or the plains, but your body, physically, would adapt quite well and quickly to any of the CA coastal climates. [Generalization].

Now, whether or not your mind/spirit could adjust to CA these days-well, that is individual....(:

CO is a great place; as is CA.

Last edited by Mike from back east; 04-28-2012 at 11:40 AM.. Reason: Deleting excessive quoted material....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 07-03-2012, 12:06 AM
 
Location: USA
372 posts, read 309,391 times
Reputation: 384
I think the usage of both of these state's names in terms of comparing climates is used way too loosely. By this I mean simply saying California's or Colorado's climate is this or that, is not as specific or accurate as it should be. Regions such as "Southern California" or "The western slope of Colorado" always have a distinct climates compared to the other regions of these states. Hope this makes sense : )

The far Northern areas of California mostly north of the central valley have a climate very different from the rest of the state, and I would relate this part of California more to Colorado than the rest of California. Although snow is very rare in the areas of California I'm referring to, the average monthly temperatures overall are similar to Denver, or Colorado Springs, and California recieves more rain in these areas than Colorado. Tornados in California's central valley are also more common than people think, although they are not usually destructive or large. The northern coast of California is also very humid and foggy compared to the southern coast, San Francisco is known for its layers of low clouds large parts of the year. Areas near the Sierra Nevada Mountains also recieve large amounts of snow or snow at all when compared to the rest of the California, although still in low amounts when compared to Colorado.

California is a very geographical diverse state and certain parts do recieve very diverse weather patterns, even San Diego has periods in October and November of cloudy days for two weeks and very little sunshine. Of course this makes up only a fraction of the year. Although Southern California does have areas of trees and lush foliage, the majority of the region is desert and brown due to it's very little precipitation. The Mojave desert or Palmdale, California is a region where you're lucky to find more than ten trees every ten miles.

There's no doubt that Colorado has extreme weather, but it's not as extreme or long lasting as most outsiders think. The reason 60% of Colorado is so dry and brown with groups of trees scattered only over large areas is because the of lack of precipitation of all types. Colorado is not buried in snow all winter as people think, if it was would it still be so dry and brown? Yes it snows and can be very snowy at times, but it's always breif and spread out. Strong Winds along the front range is a nuisance when it occurs, but it only occurs a very brief time of the year from around Feb to April. The front range is also very sunny which usually melts snowfalls quickly, as does the dry air. The sunny climate of Colorado is something I'm surprised so few people appreciate, or notice. Winter temperatures average a high of 44 degrees and lows of around 20 degrees Farenheit in the front range area, this is comparable to places such as Mt. Shasta and Redding, California. Southeastern Colorado actually averages teperatures slightly above this in the winter.

The western slope, and eastern Colorado have much more extreme weather patterns of all types than the front range of course, but summers in the lower areas of the western slope are still mild. Anyone who's been to Colorado in the summer knows it is warm or hot depending on the region, with little precipitation and lots of sunshine, which is comparable to many areas of California. Of course the threat of Thunderstorms is much greater in Colorado but it rarely leads to anything more than some rain and lightning for 20 minutes at a time. Colorado's climate changes quickly, but it's usually brief and spread out. Like the classic saying goes "if you don't like the weather in Colorado wait five minutes".

Colorado is definitely not like 90% of California in terms of weather, but both states do share commonalities of climate in certain regions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 07-03-2012, 08:22 AM
 
7,655 posts, read 13,884,995 times
Reputation: 7464
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMM64 View Post
Colorado is definitely not like 90% of California in terms of weather, but both states do share commonalities of climate in certain regions.
I've studied the climate of both states for decades and I can not think of one place in either state where the climates are truly comparable between Colorado and California. For one thing, the seasonal precipitation patterns are fundamentally different in both states. About the only place in California I would consider to have a similar climate to anyplace in Colorado is Bridgeport, which does share some similarities with some high mountain valleys in Colorado. Still, that is a stretch, since Bridgeport still shares with the rest of California the Mediterranean pattern of extremely dry summers. I would also note that Bridgeport's climate is pretty much unique within California, as it geographically shares little in common with the rest of the state.

The climates of both states have much variation within each state, but the fact remains that Colorado is an interior continental state with statewide climate patterns that reflect that, while California is a coastal state with well-defined weather patterns influenced by the Pacific Ocean currents, with climate patterns that reflect that proximity, even in its desert areas. The flora and fauna of both states can be similar to one another in places, and that fools people into thinking that the climates of the two states are similar in those places, but they are not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 07-03-2012, 02:26 PM
 
Location: USA
372 posts, read 309,391 times
Reputation: 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I've studied the climate of both states for decades and I can not think of one place in either state where the climates are truly comparable between Colorado and California. For one thing, the seasonal precipitation patterns are fundamentally different in both states. About the only place in California I would consider to have a similar climate to anyplace in Colorado is Bridgeport, which does share some similarities with some high mountain valleys in Colorado. Still, that is a stretch, since Bridgeport still shares with the rest of California the Mediterranean pattern of extremely dry summers. I would also note that Bridgeport's climate is pretty much unique within California, as it geographically shares little in common with the rest of the state.

The climates of both states have much variation within each state, but the fact remains that Colorado is an interior continental state with statewide climate patterns that reflect that, while California is a coastal state with well-defined weather patterns influenced by the Pacific Ocean currents, with climate patterns that reflect that proximity, even in its desert areas. The flora and fauna of both states can be similar to one another in places, and that fools people into thinking that the climates of the two states are similar in those places, but they are not.
I agree with you, I never said they were exactly similar, or even that they shared the same weather patterns. I just stated that there are more similarities than is genrally realized when comparing certain areas and certain types of activity. People tend to think that all of Colorado and California are polar opposites in terms of climate, and I was simply stating that this is not 100% the case in a elaborative breakdown of certain regions and seasonal weather activity. The common but false belief that all of CA is sunny and 70 degrees all year, and the equally common but untrue belief that CO is cold and snowy all year is the basis which I was coming from. Sorry if you misunderstood this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-25-2013, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Alta, WY (Teton Valley)
46 posts, read 27,284 times
Reputation: 41
Just now found this.. good stuff. As a recent resident of CA and also some time spent in CO... I think where some of the comparisons come in is the sun and relatively low humidity. You get quite a bit of both of those in CA and CO. I know that's a big factor for us in deciding on Montana Vs Colorado.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:59 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top