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Old 05-09-2012, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,479 posts, read 11,015,381 times
Reputation: 8329
Suezo wrote:
would one be able to survive with $30-33 per hour salary in Colorado?
I've been surviving quite comfortably on considerably less than that.
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Old 05-09-2012, 08:08 PM
 
2,182 posts, read 3,408,223 times
Reputation: 2381
Wink Why Greeley is not Denver, and so on

As placement, job and income may all be well met in a variety of areas, you may wish to more closely consider the merits of each one.

Even if one of the more expensive locals in Colorado, and plenty nice enough by most common standards, some would dismiss Boulder out of hand as being too liberal. Others, of course, like just that, and wouldn't live anywhere else. Politics and culture aside, it enjoys a beautiful setting with direct access into the mountains.

Farther down US 36, greater metro Denver (of which some include Boulder, forgetting it purposefully maintains an island greenbelt) would appeal more to those wishing the most options in an urban environment. There are a number of desirable adjacent suburbs to the CBD, or one may wish to locate directly where the most action is.

At something of a distance and more isolated, Colorado Springs is large enough to offer all the city and services many will want. As with Boulder, it is at times too easily dismissed for the opposite reason: in far from the presumed near-pagan citadel of Boulder; but rather far too fundamentalist and Christian. Some truth in that, but mostly to those so attuned and seeking like company. If wishing something a bit less conservative, just jump over to adjacent Manitou Springs to the west, and a remarkable transformation.

Both Loveland and Greeley have respectable populations, who presumably are not being held there against their wills. But as just south of and to the east of Fort Collins, many in that fair town might consider one odd for wanting to live anywhere else—and in no hurry to emigrate to either Greeley or Loveland (Windsor need not apply, either). Ft. Collins is far enough removed from metro Denver that its biggest downside is often considered the vibrant competition for decent jobs locally. But if one can find work in Loveland, Ft. Collins in general should be all the easier. As Boulder, it enjoys good access into Rocky Mountain National Park, and the mountains in general; but not as ready access to skiing.

Some may not care about that; or others say: "Dude, no way!" Just as some would wish to live in downtown Denver, and others avoid that like the plague. To each their own. So some consideration what one likes, as each of these areas providing different aspects of that.
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Old 05-10-2012, 08:36 AM
 
8 posts, read 6,021 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
You should be able to live just fine on $30/hour if you work anywhere near 2000 hours/year. A lot of people live here on less.
Alright, thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Suezo wrote:
would one be able to survive with $30-33 per hour salary in Colorado?
I've been surviving quite comfortably on considerably less than that.
Good to hear that! I thought at first that the salary would not suffice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
As placement, job and income may all be well met in a variety of areas, you may wish to more closely consider the merits of each one.

Even if one of the more expensive locals in Colorado, and plenty nice enough by most common standards, some would dismiss Boulder out of hand as being too liberal. Others, of course, like just that, and wouldn't live anywhere else. Politics and culture aside, it enjoys a beautiful setting with direct access into the mountains.

Farther down US 36, greater metro Denver (of which some include Boulder, forgetting it purposefully maintains an island greenbelt) would appeal more to those wishing the most options in an urban environment. There are a number of desirable adjacent suburbs to the CBD, or one may wish to locate directly where the most action is.

At something of a distance and more isolated, Colorado Springs is large enough to offer all the city and services many will want. As with Boulder, it is at times too easily dismissed for the opposite reason: in far from the presumed near-pagan citadel of Boulder; but rather far too fundamentalist and Christian. Some truth in that, but mostly to those so attuned and seeking like company. If wishing something a bit less conservative, just jump over to adjacent Manitou Springs to the west, and a remarkable transformation.

Both Loveland and Greeley have respectable populations, who presumably are not being held there against their wills. But as just south of and to the east of Fort Collins, many in that fair town might consider one odd for wanting to live anywhere else—and in no hurry to emigrate to either Greeley or Loveland (Windsor need not apply, either). Ft. Collins is far enough removed from metro Denver that its biggest downside is often considered the vibrant competition for decent jobs locally. But if one can find work in Loveland, Ft. Collins in general should be all the easier. As Boulder, it enjoys good access into Rocky Mountain National Park, and the mountains in general; but not as ready access to skiing.

Some may not care about that; or others say: "Dude, no way!" Just as some would wish to live in downtown Denver, and others avoid that like the plague. To each their own. So some consideration what one likes, as each of these areas providing different aspects of that.
Is it true that there are no trees in Denver?
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Old 05-10-2012, 09:55 AM
 
2,182 posts, read 3,408,223 times
Reputation: 2381
Wink Trees in Denver

No trees in Denver?

I'm not exactly sure about the CBD, but presume there are plenty. In general, all towns along the front range are veritable oases of trees (by semi-arid Colorado standards). That is a caveat a mile wide (high, in this case) if one uses as comparison the eastern US; nowhere is there the dense foliage one would customarily find in such as New Hampshire, or in the far wetter PNW west of the Cascade mountains.

But there are still lots of trees. Boulder is a good case in point. Visit their park on Flagstaff mountain, and a superb view of the front range mountains to the west, Boulder far below, and east of these mountains abruptly jutting up, nearly flat and but grassy plains running out as far as the eye can see. It is a distinct contrast, and good example of where the trees naturally grow—in the mountains—and basically as not on the plains. The exception to that are the banks of rivers, such as the South Platte, which are naturally lined with vegetation such as large and stately cottonwood trees. One other, is where mankind has intervened.

Find old photos of the CU campus when first instituted, and remarkable the paucity of trees on both that campus and greater Boulder. Most that exist there now have been purposefully planted, or perhaps springing from those that have and now more able to live in this more hospitable man-made climate. Boulder has a lot of old lovely trees, and may only be found wanting by someone with the standards of a place where one's lawn is defined by how far out they mow, rather than—by contrast—a postage stamp constantly watered and tended.

Denver is no different. One could surely find some residence without a single tree to its name. So better to find a home where that is exactly not the case. You'll have a lot better chance of finding that in Denver than out on the plains.
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Old 05-10-2012, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Southeastern Colorado
317 posts, read 330,441 times
Reputation: 414
Here is a "photo" from Google Lat Long: More 3D trees in the western United States.

b+-+trees+3.jpg

Even though the site refers to "Cheeseman" Park, it's actually Cheesman Park. (This is Colorado, not Wisconsin!)

Here's a shot of the Denver Skyline found here at tripadvisor.

denver-skyline-taken.jpg
Attached Thumbnails
Moving to CO... Pls. help.-b-trees-3.jpg   Moving to CO... Pls. help.-denver-skyline-taken.jpg  
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Old 05-11-2012, 08:56 PM
 
8 posts, read 6,021 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
No trees in Denver?

I'm not exactly sure about the CBD, but presume there are plenty. In general, all towns along the front range are veritable oases of trees (by semi-arid Colorado standards). That is a caveat a mile wide (high, in this case) if one uses as comparison the eastern US; nowhere is there the dense foliage one would customarily find in such as New Hampshire, or in the far wetter PNW west of the Cascade mountains.

But there are still lots of trees. Boulder is a good case in point. Visit their park on Flagstaff mountain, and a superb view of the front range mountains to the west, Boulder far below, and east of these mountains abruptly jutting up, nearly flat and but grassy plains running out as far as the eye can see. It is a distinct contrast, and good example of where the trees naturally grow—in the mountains—and basically as not on the plains. The exception to that are the banks of rivers, such as the South Platte, which are naturally lined with vegetation such as large and stately cottonwood trees. One other, is where mankind has intervened.

Find old photos of the CU campus when first instituted, and remarkable the paucity of trees on both that campus and greater Boulder. Most that exist there now have been purposefully planted, or perhaps springing from those that have and now more able to live in this more hospitable man-made climate. Boulder has a lot of old lovely trees, and may only be found wanting by someone with the standards of a place where one's lawn is defined by how far out they mow, rather than—by contrast—a postage stamp constantly watered and tended.

Denver is no different. One could surely find some residence without a single tree to its name. So better to find a home where that is exactly not the case. You'll have a lot better chance of finding that in Denver than out on the plains.
That's good to hear though. I really thought that the place has only full of buildings and roads, and I was wrong. How about the winter? Did it really get super cold out there? I mean from the person who lives in tropical country, is there a possibility that I wouldn't survive it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bovinedivine View Post
Here is a "photo" from Google Lat Long: More 3D trees in the western United States.

b+-+trees+3.jpg

Even though the site refers to "Cheeseman" Park, it's actually Cheesman Park. (This is Colorado, not Wisconsin!)

Here's a shot of the Denver Skyline found here at tripadvisor.

denver-skyline-taken.jpg
I'v never seen these pictures before. It's a beautiful place. Thank you.
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Old 05-11-2012, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
2,774 posts, read 4,529,063 times
Reputation: 2037
Suezo, there are plenty of threads on here about the weather in Denver. Yes, it does get cold and yes it snows in the winter. But it also is sunny most of the time and with the low humidity it doesn't feel so bad. If you are considering moving to a state that has mountains and snow, then you'll need to think about buying some winter clothes so that you can "survive".

If you do enough research, you'll find that winters in Denver are really not as bad as you are fearing.
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Old 05-12-2012, 09:45 AM
 
8 posts, read 6,021 times
Reputation: 10
Thanks for the input!

I can't wait to move in Colorado and start a new life and enjoy its outdoor activities.
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