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Old 05-20-2012, 01:45 PM
 
49 posts, read 157,024 times
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I have lived in Arizona all my life, my dad was a cotton farmer, growing up we lived all over Arizona except for the Northern areas. All I can say is, I am so very tired of the extremely long HOT summers, they seem to go on forever! My kids don't even want to go outside and swim June-August. I fell in love with Colorado several years ago and visit regularly and the winters don't seem all that bad like other parts of the US. We love Fort Collins, Gunbarrel and Erie, job isn't an issue, however we will have to scale down in the size of house we will buy. Housing in Colorado seems to be more expensive. I recently met someone here in Chandler that was born and raised in Longmont and I asked her why would she want to leave that beautiful area? She told me "she fell out of love with the beauty that she could no longer see", I was stunned by how she felt but I guess that is how I feel about Chandler and Arizona in general. I love the idea of 4 seasons in Colorado and year around activities. Everything looks the same here, the houses all look the same, suburbs, streets etc. Arizona has changed so much, I think Phx Metro is the 5th largest city in the US now. Just wondering if anyone that has moved to Colorado, wants to get back to Arizona or misses Arizona and why or why not?
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Old 05-20-2012, 06:32 PM
 
529 posts, read 1,189,961 times
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If I were to go by my perception of your attitude about Colorado I would say that you will definitely like Colorado, but no place is perfect. I have lived in both AZ and CO and just like anywhere there are the goods and the bads. The summers in the Phoenix area got to be too hot for me very quickly, however I really enjoyed October thru Februrary in AZ. The "feel" of Phoenix or Tucson vs Denver/Boulder or Colorado Springs is significantly different in my opinion. By this I mean that my perception of culture, and urban lifestyle is less diverse in Colorado (Many people will disagree with me here by the way though), Phoenix also gave me much more of a large metro area feel than Denver does. I have lived in Colorado now for several years and I love it, the weather is great and the opportunities are limitless.

As far as the Colorado winters go, winters are mild in the Front Range areas of Denver and Colorado Springs, but compared to Phoenix Colorado winters will not seem mild at all. It just takes getting used to, and you'll realize that winters in other parts of the country can be far worse than Colorado. Flagstaff Arizona has a similar climate to Denver, so if you've been to Flagstaff you'll know what to expect.

Colorado and Arizona are both beautiful places to live, and I still love going back to AZ to visit friends and places like Petrified Forest National Park. It's all up to the beholder to decide which place is better or more beautiful, but you won't be disappointed either way.

As far as cost of living, Denver is a little more expensive than Phoenix in this category but over time it will not seem like that drastic of a difference. Gas prices, housing costs, state taxes are all pretty close in CO and AZ overall. Colorado Springs does have a lower cost of living than both Denver and Phoenix, and in my opinion is a much better place to live than Denver.

Anyway good luck with your decision, hope this helps.

Last edited by JMM64; 05-20-2012 at 06:48 PM..
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Old 05-20-2012, 06:44 PM
 
590 posts, read 2,007,406 times
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The winters in Colorado can be long and drawn out. You can expect snow 9 months of the year, more if you live in the mountains, though the early snows and late snows tend to leave little accumulation. Summer is usually warm and winter is usually cold, but I think of the spring and fall as a mix of both. The high altitude and mountains mean the weather can change drastically day to day. As the saying goes it can be 80F and people wonder if it will snow later. It can be very windy as well. In some parts of the country when 80-100 MPH winds are forecast it means a hurricane is coming and people board up their windows and empty out the grocery stores in advance. In Colorado, there's a high wind advisory and a full cup of McDonald's coffee can blow over.
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Old 05-20-2012, 07:11 PM
 
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I wouldn't agree with md21722's view on the climate in Colorado, but the possibilty of snow is from roughly Oct to April. That being said it rarely snows at a noticeable level in Oct, Nov and April. Even snow in December thru March will be spread out with only 15 days at the most of accumulation. The temperature will average around 45 degrees in winter.

One thing people must understand is that just because it can snow for 7 to 9 months of the year, all this means is that frozen precipitation is possible, and does not mean it accumulates and the temperature is 30 degrees the whole time. Usually January and March is when accumulation occurs, but it will melt within 3 to 6 days of falling, and is not the wet or damp snow that falls near the coasts. Snow always melts quickly in the Denver Area, and it never goes from 80 degrees to snowing in 24 hours but maybe once every other year, and when it does the "snow" falls briefly and does not accumulate.

Colorado is one of the driest states in the USA, so if it snowed all the time would this still be true?

Last edited by JMM64; 05-20-2012 at 08:29 PM..
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Old 05-20-2012, 07:27 PM
 
178 posts, read 463,684 times
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I lived around the state of Arizona most of my life and I'm now in Colorado. I remember when I-10 didn't exist and you had to take Highway 60 if you wanted to go to California. There is absolutely no chance that after having been in Arizona all your life that you won't miss it. As beautiful as Colorado is, you will still miss Arizona. Have you thought about milder climates in Arizona like Prescott or Payson? I have lived in Phoenix, Flagstaff, Prescott, La Paz county and only a few miles from the Arizona border in Southwestern Utah. Even though I now have an incredible view of the San Juan Mountains I still have mostly good memories of Arizona and I'm really looking forward to visiting my in-laws in Flagstaff and Prescott.

I don't regret moving to Colorado. We got jobs here and housing was more affordable at the time. We moved to Canon City and found it to be a mild climate with short winters and little snow. The Fort Collins area will definitely be colder with longer winters than Canon City. Overall, I would rather now live in Colorado but after the novelty of moving wears off there will be days when you will be haunted by Arizona memories.
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:24 PM
 
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Thanks for all the great information, this is such a tough decision. GStone777, my oldest just graduated this spring from NAU, she loved every minute of Flagstaff and is now back down here in PHX and hates it. I know she won't be here long but is working on her resume and such. If you took highway 60 and past thru Gila Bend and Dateland AZ that is where I spent the most time growing up, right in the desert. Your probably right in that I will be haunted by memories.
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:28 PM
 
529 posts, read 1,189,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GStone777 View Post
I lived around the state of Arizona most of my life and I'm now in Colorado. I remember when I-10 didn't exist and you had to take Highway 60 if you wanted to go to California. There is absolutely no chance that after having been in Arizona all your life that you won't miss it. As beautiful as Colorado is, you will still miss Arizona. Have you thought about milder climates in Arizona like Prescott or Payson? I have lived in Phoenix, Flagstaff, Prescott, La Paz county and only a few miles from the Arizona border in Southwestern Utah. Even though I now have an incredible view of the San Juan Mountains I still have mostly good memories of Arizona and I'm really looking forward to visiting my in-laws in Flagstaff and Prescott.

I don't regret moving to Colorado. We got jobs here and housing was more affordable at the time. We moved to Canon City and found it to be a mild climate with short winters and little snow. The Fort Collins area will definitely be colder with longer winters than Canon City. Overall, I would rather now live in Colorado but after the novelty of moving wears off there will be days when you will be haunted by Arizona memories.
Good point regarding Ft Collins vs Canon City winters, I forgot to mention that.
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:47 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
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Increasingly, metro blobs are metro blobs, wherever they are. Same big boxes, same chain restaurants, same "blah" architecture. So, if your desire is to escape that, moving from one metro area to another probably won't make you any happier.

Now, as far as climate, you have to decide what you loathe more. If you despise brutal, seemingly endless hot summers, then Arizona is not the place to be. If you despise long, mostly brown winters, with freezing temperatures nearly every night, then Colorado's Front Range is not for you.

People also assume incorrectly when they think that all of Colorado gets more precipitation than Arizona. For example, Grand Junction, Colorado gets less annual precipitation than does Tucson, Arizona.

Some people compromise between Colorado and Arizona's metro area's climates and choose Albuquerque, New Mexico. Cooler than Phoenix or Tucson in summer, but warmer in winter than Colorado's Front Range. That can either be interpreted as compromising for the best of both worlds or the worst, depending on one's outlook.

For me, I couldn't stand Phoenix for a second. I find even Colorado's lowland areas too hot for my tastes in summer. I've lived in one of the hotter places in Colorado in summer and in one of the coldest places in Colorado in winter. I deal with the cold much more readily, but I find that I'm probably the exception to the rule in climatic preference.
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Old 05-20-2012, 09:09 PM
 
16,163 posts, read 20,172,692 times
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When my best friend moved to California in the mid 80's due to his wife's job transfer, I would get out to see him a couple times a year. When I went down through Phoenix and took I-10 west, I remember when Dysart Road was out in the boonies, the 101 loop was just built and the 202 and 303 loops weren't thought of if I recall correctly. At that time Dysart Road was probably 5 miles west of the last stick of real estate heading west. Now the housing developments have marauded west of Phoenix like General Patton and his troops marching across Europe. I was through there a couple months ago. It is now the same type of developments the OP is referring to interchange after interchange; McDonalds, Home Depot, Sam's Club, etc., etc. And the developments are getting closer to the Palo Verde Nuclear Plant. Phoenix-the 5th largest metro area in the U.S.? I don't doubt it, it's getting massive.
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Old 05-20-2012, 09:14 PM
 
178 posts, read 463,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesbndgrl123 View Post
Thanks for all the great information, this is such a tough decision. GStone777, my oldest just graduated this spring from NAU, she loved every minute of Flagstaff and is now back down here in PHX and hates it. I know she won't be here long but is working on her resume and such. If you took highway 60 and past thru Gila Bend and Dateland AZ that is where I spent the most time growing up, right in the desert. Your probably right in that I will be haunted by memories.
I also graduated from NAU and lived in Phoenix for 2 1/2 years, from 2004 to 2007, before moving to Colorado. I had never lived in a big city before and it was an excellent education about big city ways. I was very happy to move and now that I know about big cities I will appreciate my small town even more. I have been through Gila Bend and have taken highway 95 to Yuma but I have never been to Dateland and the farming areas along the Gila River. Living in the Phoenix Metro area would take a lot of getting used to after growing up in Dateland.
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