U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-04-2012, 01:52 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,017,909 times
Reputation: 7537

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I too wonder how folks in NY, NJ, etc, deal with high tax loads, and I'm sure that's why a lot of them head out upon retirement, making low tax states attractive to many retirees.

IIRC you're in PA, which does have some attractive tax benefits for retirees, as in NO state income tax on pensions. But I've heard that some PA "townships" have stiff property taxes and that there's some sort of heavy state estate tax.
I wouldn't be surprised around Philadelphia if that was the case. Overall with taxes and fees my burden is less than Colorado and way less than if I moved over to New York State.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-04-2012, 05:11 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,835,868 times
Reputation: 2615
Wink Durango as dream and reality

In short, in moving from Long Island one will likely enjoy a lower cost of living—and thoroughly enjoy Durango.

Insofar as taxes, much better than some other places in the US (so everyone may wish to pay attention, lest our Colorado politicians get any ideas).

Even with the growth of the last few decades it has experienced, Durango is still a great place. All the more so for those relatively few who can actually afford to live there, versus maybe survive. Outside money makes all the difference in that. As life can be unfair, then good example with those of a long residence and love being priced out by others intrinsically changing some of the finer aspects of the place, but also keeping the entire region becoming one big condo complex due most dreamers being unable to make a living there.

As mentioned, do ascertain if Durango and its beautiful surroundings will provide most everything one will want. Because far more than a place such as Summit County, it really is isolated. Durango by far the biggest town in southwest Colorado, and one will probably not consider Farmington, NM to the south much of an alternative. So Albuquerque, NM, at about four hours drive one-way, is it. If this can be an infrequent pleasure then it probably will be: save relatively infrequent truly bad weather and road conditions, US 550 to ABQ is a largely lightly traveled, beautiful and enjoyable drive. Otherwise, there is a good reason so many live in the mountains just west of the front range. Jobs, primarily, but do not overlook all the many services and social options. Although if taking a dim view of that, then somewhere outside of Durango could be all the better (and one just complaining about all the tourists when in town).

Not coincidentally, there is no way to pack nearly 5m in a relatively thin band along the front range and not have them infiltrate the nearby mountains. Generally, the farther from population centers the more serene one's outdoor experiences will be. If surprising at times how far out in the middle of nowhere one can endeavor to be, and perhaps still surrounded by the racket somebody is making.

Anyway, Durango is a fine choice, if perhaps an all the more expensive one in time, and if anything that lowering real estate values. Most Americans would have a coronary if suddenly faced with the petrol prices Europeans customarily pay. Consider that, or why ours should be so relatively low in comparison. The cost of fossil fuel will be rising significantly in future, and surely more rapidly in this country than in places where kept artificially higher due taxes. Everyone will feel the effects, but distinctly those who routinely drive many miles per week. But even those living in town and walking distance of a market will see appreciably higher prices reflected there from higher transport costs. Save the metropolitan front range, most of Colorado will be feeling itself quite spread out and isolated when the price of fuel will really matter.

In the meantime, many aspects of Durango—if the money—present the idyll that many another can only dream of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2012, 05:03 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
I have older family in Florida, two children one of college age, the other who will be entering college before I make any big move. In short the expensive real estate and property taxes on LI will make it next to impossible for a young person starting out to buy a home in a decent (safe, middle of the road) neighborhood with mediocre schools. LIke all of my friends children have done -- my children will be moving away from NY and the north east.
I found that statement interesting but at odds with what I'm seeing further South here in the DC area where kids are staying because jobs are relatively easy to come by. That would be a consideration for me about moving somewhere like Durango where I'd be pretty far from my kids who would presumably remain here where they grew up and are able to maintain employment.

Having spent quite a bit of time in both places, I'd probably choose VT over Southern CO, partly because it's less isolated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,685 posts, read 27,887,589 times
Reputation: 7177
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
I found that statement interesting but at odds with what I'm seeing further South here in the DC area where kids are staying because jobs are relatively easy to come by. That would be a consideration for me about moving somewhere like Durango where I'd be pretty far from my kids who would presumably remain here where they grew up and are able to maintain employment.

Having spent quite a bit of time in both places, I'd probably choose VT over Southern CO, partly because it's less isolated.
Property taxes and an unfavorable business climate have sent many businesses off of LI and in some cases, out of NY state completely. Not to say all young people are fleeing. Those who stay are either living in small, illegal apartments or are still at home with mom and dad because they can't afford any place after they've paid their student loans.

Taxes on the VT house are half of what they currently are on LI and 5X what they are on a nicer home (not fancy, just outbuildings and one more bedroom) in Durango.

Believe me, I have taken all warnings about the more isolated nature of Durango to heart.

I am only in phase one of the long term plan -- exploring potential options.

Someone suggested Denver. We didn't stop there, but driving through reminded me of driving from a mini Manhattan through Brooklyn, Queens and Nassau County. Blech. Seeing the vast flatness to the east depressed me, but I did like the mountains looming to the west.

I need trees. I need at least some rolling topography if not completely in the mountains. I do not want to be anywhere near a city, but want to be near a town with cultural activities, a grocery store, and be able to roll out of bed and into a trout stream.

I really appreciate everyone's input and if there are any areas which sound somewhat similar to the above -- please let me know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2012, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
Reputation: 9287
How about Coeur d'Alene-ID?
The Coeur d'Alene area is surrounded by dozens of lakes left behind by the glaciers of the ice age. There are more than 55 lakes within easy driving distance of Coeur d'Alene, but none more scenic and full of activities than Lake Coeur d'Alene itself.

There's something magical about Lake Coeur d'Alene that's hard to define, but it begins with the spectacular North Idaho sunsets and moonrises, the plunge of an osprey after a fish, the glowing lights of downtown Coeur d’Alene reflecting across its waters at night.
How about Sandpoint-ID you prefer an even smaller town?
Nestled at the base of the Selkirk Mountains in North Idaho's Panhandle region, the community of Sandpoint can be found 60 miles south of the Canadian border and 75 miles northeast of Spokane, Washington. With a population of approximately 7,000 residents, Sandpoint is located in a land of uncompromising natural beauty on the northern shore of Lake Pend Oreille (pronounced Pon-der-ray).

A spectacular, glaciated body of water 43 miles long, Pend Oreille is the fifth deepest lake (1,158 feet at its greatest depth) in the United States with 111 miles of shoreline. Its pristine waters are a major factor in the community of Sandpoint's high ranking as a premier tourist destination.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2012, 12:27 PM
 
18 posts, read 46,863 times
Reputation: 36
We have lived in Durango for the past 2 years. Moved here from the Monument/ Black Forest area of Colorado. Housing prices are similiar to the 80908 and 80132 zip codes of those areas. We still own a 40 acre property in N. Black Forest that we lease for $1800 per month and we lease a 5 acre property here with a larger house for $1500 per month. We are 10 miles from downtown Durango on Florida Mesa. Housing prices have declined steadily since we moved here. Property taxes are less here but general living expenses are a little higher. Like others have said, I would recommend renting for awhile while you learn about the area and decide where you would be happiest living.
Durango can be somewhat of a zoo during tourist season. It brings needed revenue to the town and local businesses.

I consider Durango weather mild. They have had heavy winters on occasion. But they don't have the strong winds that the Palmer Divide has that can bring alot of drifting.
We have lived in CO. since 1969 in different areas (2nd time here) and find this to be our favorite part of the state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2012, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
I need trees. I need at least some rolling topography if not completely in the mountains. I do not want to be anywhere near a city, but want to be near a town with cultural activities, a grocery store, and be able to roll out of bed and into a trout stream.

I really appreciate everyone's input and if there are any areas which sound somewhat similar to the above -- please let me know.
Rappahannock County, Virginia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2012, 08:03 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,017,909 times
Reputation: 7537
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post

I need trees. I need at least some rolling topography if not completely in the mountains. I do not want to be anywhere near a city, but want to be near a town with cultural activities, a grocery store, and be able to roll out of bed and into a trout stream.

I really appreciate everyone's input and if there are any areas which sound somewhat similar to the above -- please let me know.
Colorado is a weird state. The high elevations catch much of the moisture and most of the rest of the state gets screwed. The really nice forested areas with firs and aspens are either very expensive, very isolated or owned by the government and in any case are very sparsely inhabited and completely buried under winter 9 months of the year.

Durango kind of sits on that zone between desert and mountains. To get away from scruffy trees, you'll need to get up above 7000-7500 ft, ideally more like 8000-8500 ft, which those areas exist near Durango, but keep in mind you are in thinner air and another climate zone with longer winters. Again worth seeing if you like that before settling. A lot of people like it, some don't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 06:31 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,575,619 times
Reputation: 1883
When my wife & I settled upon Durango several years ago, we had fallen in love with Vallecito. However it quickly became apparent that the altitude and isolation of Vallecito was not for us year round. 9 months of winter every year did not sound like retirement. Instead, we bought land on the Florida Mesa, 7 miles south of Durango and 4 miles from the new hospital.

Being south of US160 as it runs from Carbon Jct to Bayfield, we are in the zone where LaPlata County building requirement for roof snow load capacity is far lower. Our land is at 6,686' and is within 1 mile sight distance from DRO. It is technically high desert. My wife's Aunt & Uncle also live on the Mesa just a few miles west of our land and tell us that the winters just that short distance south of Durango and 10-15 miles south of the mountains are much milder compared to those areas. Uncle's daughter lives up near Lemon reservoir and tells us about the several multi-foot snowfalls they've had in past years. On the Mesa, the high desert climate makes a difference with a lot less moisture and lighter snowfalls. Light enough that it doesn't stay around too long most winters unless they get a foot or so which does happen from time to time.

It's amazing what a difference a few miles latitude and 1,000-1,500 ft less altitude makes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top