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Old 06-08-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,757 posts, read 4,399,040 times
Reputation: 4850

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I'm a strong supporter of mining and energy production. That does not change the fact that it is an extractive industry of a finite resource. Unfortunately, mining and energy production tend to be relatively economically unstable industries compared to agriculture--a "boom-bust" economy that can be challenging one in which to exist for a community. I should know, I spent many years living in communities that depended on both mining and agriculture. Agriculture was relatively stable, mining came and went. All of that said, I would take either over rural Colorado's increasingly "funny-money" F.I.R.E. tourist/retiree/recreation economy that is largely built on a foundation of sand.
Agreed, those of us that lived or spent any kind of time outside of the Denver metro area for a long enough time understand exactly what the energy fields mean to the economy, and just how quickly things can go bad.

In the early 80s my step dad worked in the oil field 70 hours a week, and made damn good money at the time. Then almost overnight is hours were cut to 40 a week, and a couple of months later they were cut to 25 hours. Gas prices had dropped to the point where the oil companies had to cut back on production, and anybody working in that field was lucky if they kept a job. Houses in some areas dropped 75-80% of their value in a few months, as people could no longer afford to live in some of these remote areas.

Colorado needs some kind of stable economic force behind their economy, for years that was agriculture, but now that is disappearing, leaving the state with a dependence on tourism and to a lesser point IT. tourism can come and go depending on what the rest of the country and world for that matter is able to afford. As for IT, it is not exactly stable, and unless you are the silicon valley with the major players established, there is not a large tax base that is created with those types of companies.

When the mineral field goes bust, oil prices suddenly drop, or regulations get to the point where oil companies can no longer make a profit on production in the state, then Colorado is in for a world of hurt. Unless they can find a steady commodity to actually produce income between now and then.
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Old 06-08-2012, 10:19 AM
 
Location: N. Colorado
345 posts, read 758,179 times
Reputation: 284
OP you need to stay put since you have everything that your family wants close by. That does not exist here.
The only rodeos I know of here are the ones with some of the county fairs, state fair and the Jan livestock show in Denver whose name escapes me.

I live on a farm, I have to buy hay at least 6 months out of the year since it is brown here at least that long. The cost skyrocketed this year due to Texas drought and the hay being shipped there. What use to cost $4 per bale went up to $10 or higher.

I have a full use well but those are fewer and fewer nowadays. I have no water rights or mineral rights. But I am allowed to use my well water for the animals and any garden. If you do not have a full use well, you will need to buy and bring in water for any other use besides household.

If you were to find an affordable property in the mountains, you would not be near any rodeo, and you may have a heck of a time fencing it in if it is hilly or very rocky. Plus there would be no large open spaces for them to graze. Down here that is all it would be but again half the year it is dead and you have to buy hay, lots of hay.
It is not easy to have animals or a garden in a semi-arid state, sure we have less problems like worms but there are other costs and issues that come with the climate and water, or lack thereof.

The cost of living here in not less then Upstate, I have relatives who live there and the main thing you would save on is property taxes, not much else and you would be paying higher plate fees for you car and higher feed costs so it would cancel out any savings.

You have what works now, all close by, plus jobs I would not change it for less property taxes.
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Old 06-09-2012, 07:39 PM
 
5 posts, read 7,852 times
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well thank you everyone, i found a place for 400k with 40 acres 4 water shares an indoor and outdoor arena with boarding stalls for horses, its own hay supply and is 40 minutes from the local ski mountain. So i would like to say thank you to the few who have tried to assist me in the best way possible on answering my questions.
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Old 06-09-2012, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Southeastern Colorado
319 posts, read 620,011 times
Reputation: 439
Congratluations and good luck to you and your family, griffen0218. Mind cluing us in on the general area you may be settling in?
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Old 06-09-2012, 08:04 PM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,790,850 times
Reputation: 18081
Quote:
Originally Posted by griffen0218 View Post
well thank you everyone, i found a place for 400k with 40 acres 4 water shares an indoor and outdoor arena with boarding stalls for horses, its own hay supply and is 40 minutes from the local ski mountain. So i would like to say thank you to the few who have tried to assist me in the best way possible on answering my questions.
Awesome! And the experts said it couldn't be done.....
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Old 06-09-2012, 08:04 PM
 
5 posts, read 7,852 times
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its a place weve been looking at for a while and if we can sell the house here we will be looking at it alot more exclusively but it is located in the southwestern part of the state an hour away from the new mexico boarder
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Old 06-09-2012, 08:35 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by griffen0218 View Post
well thank you everyone, i found a place for 400k with 40 acres 4 water shares an indoor and outdoor arena with boarding stalls for horses, its own hay supply and is 40 minutes from the local ski mountain. So i would like to say thank you to the few who have tried to assist me in the best way possible on answering my questions.
Let's see . . . No statement of how much water each share represents, nor the seniority of the water right behind it. Unless the outbuildings are of pretty outstanding quality, the land is likely overpriced unless the water rights are sufficient to irrigate all of it and are senior enough to last the entire irrigating season. Even then, 40 acres will be hard pressed to support the OP's livestock, even just for the warm months. He or she will be supplemental feeding all winter. No mention of a residence in the description--I assume there isn't one? These "horsey" ranchettes are almost always suspect--they turn over often because they are high-dollar hobby ranches that usually are massive money pits.

I've seen gullible out-of-staters get skinned on these supposedly "good deals" so many times that it isn't even funny. I've spent most of my life around Colorado farm and ranch properties, and my family owned several over the years--from several hundred acres to a couple of thousand. It's not a game for uninformed buyers--and especially not for people with minimal understanding of Colorado climate, geography, water rights and agronomy.
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Old 06-10-2012, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,757 posts, read 4,399,040 times
Reputation: 4850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Awesome! And the experts said it couldn't be done.....
As I said $4,000-$6,000 per acre plus the house, and depending on the actual water rights I would not be comfortable trying to irrigate hay and having enough water for the animals on 4 shares from an indeterminate company.

Now for the animals the original poster is going to need about 15-20 acres of pasture land to properly care for the animals, with the arena and house taking up between 2-5 acres, that means he will have to produce enough hay on 20 acres to make it through the winters, which is certainly possible if getting enough water and the land is decent for alfalfa, but both are far from a given.

Either way good luck to the OP, and please before you purchase anything in Colorado spend a few hours actually researching the water situation in Colorado, and also any water rights that you would either get with the land or purchase on their own.
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Old 06-10-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Burlington, Colorado
347 posts, read 689,318 times
Reputation: 485
Quote:
Originally Posted by griffen0218 View Post
So i would like to say thank you to the few who have tried to assist me in the best way possible on answering my questions.
Just because people don't tell you exactly what you want to hear, doesn't mean they aren't trying to help or answer your question. Good luck I hope it works out.
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Old 06-10-2012, 11:04 AM
 
Location: N. Colorado
345 posts, read 758,179 times
Reputation: 284
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Awesome! And the experts said it couldn't be done.....
Mike you know as well as I do that the South part is cheap for a reason and 400k is not cheap for there. Don't people sell like 10 acres lots down there for like 20k? Since there is nothing around them and everything is a longer then normal trip. What if this house is in Alamosa, I am sure they will not be happy in a town of that size. Just to Pueblo would be 2 hours since Walsenburg has pretty much died not that is was ever huge but it was a cute town. Could be in Ignacio which means Durango is 30 mins away in good weather but everything else is far.

I did not see him say he is close to a rodeo which was one a major requirement.
Plus he said he was tired of the cost of living up there but ignored everything we said about the actual cost of living here.


Also I have to wonder do you have the equipment to irrigate it?
How many acres are actually irrigated by those few shares? Anything not watered is not going to grow on it's own, except for weeds of course
Do you have the equpiment to cut and bale the hay?
Who is going to pick up the hundreds of bales out in the field, if you do not have a hay truck?
How will you heat the water for the horses? Is there electric close by or will you have to buy small propane tanks to heat it?
Do you have equpiment to shovel lots of snow to get to them, their water, the hay?
Unless you are able to work from home, are there jobs down there for you? If so how far would they be from the house?

You really need to visit to understand the distances you will be from everything down there. You should visit in general and not rely on what you see on the internet.
I am not trying to be a downer you have to realize that it is hard to have livestock here and costly. I do have livestock for years now so I speak from experience. I would be better off with a longer growing season, a place where water is not treated like gold. Missouri would have been a place I shoud have looked into since what costs 400k here costs more like 125k there with lower taxes, more green and enough rain to not need water shares.

You should either take a road trip with your family this Summer or expand your search area for states that are more livestock friendly. But visit.
One place is not like another and what you have there you might not find elsewhere. The grass is not always greener and here that is a fact for 6 months out of the year
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