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Old 07-09-2012, 04:44 PM
 
808 posts, read 1,179,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CybrSlydr View Post
I like cool-cold with precipitation. I like what most people hate. lol I love season-long snow coverage, I love when it rains... Partly cloudy days are spectacular.
I prefer the Southern Colorado, Northern New-Mexico climate but I wonder if what you're describing might be more of a NW Rockies thing? Montana, Idaho, Washington state?

Bozeman MT 4800ft
Boise ID 2840ft
Spokane WA 2380ft
Billings MT 3120ft
Helena MT 3875ft
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Beverly, OH
53 posts, read 79,297 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SJaye View Post
If I were you I would definitely look at job availability, especially in the kinds of jobs you would be interested in.

Also, in finding a place, it may help to rank your list in order of importance, as well as things like enjoying rainy-ness and snowy-ness.

Colorado has mountains, job availability depending on what you want to do, and outside Denver and Bolder, a relatively low cost of living. But, seems like the weather is warmer and drier than you like. Altitude is also a bit higher, 5K to 8K feet.

If mountains are not as important, Minnesota and the Upper Midwest could be a good fit for you. If you can find a job there, Upstate New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine etc. may be a good fit for you, with mountains (albeit smaller than the ones in CO). MA could be good if you can tolerate a somewhat higher cost of living- live West of Boston (as possible) to get the most snow. Pittsburgh may be a good compromise too, but not as cold/snowy.

Like I said, it all depends on which of your criteria is most important because it does not seem like you will be able to get all of them.
Funny you mention Pittsburgh. I've considered there as I'm from the area (kinda) and visit there as I have family there. It would be an easy transition. But... It's familiar. I don't want to move there and wish I'd gone somewhere else. This is my chance to literally go anywhere I want - just to go back "home" would seem like a waste.
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:59 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,164,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SJaye View Post
Colorado has mountains, job availability depending on what you want to do, and outside Denver and Bolder, a relatively low cost of living.
But, for the most part, those things are mutually exclusive. The mountain areas are very high cost-of-living, with a general paucity of decent-paying jobs. The relatively low cost of living areas of rural Colorado have few, if any jobs, and what are there don't generally pay well at all. That leaves the Front Range metro areas, which, if you read my earlier posts, would seem to have a climate not to the OP's liking.
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Old 07-10-2012, 01:07 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,855,266 times
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Wink Chemistry of geography

It's time for a road trip, dude.

In driving across Nevada one could easily believe they are in the desert, as it is, although high desert. But from east to west one could not also help but appreciate the mountain ranges crossed; even if surrounded by sagebrush, quite near are high alpine peaks with snow remaining even in the midst of summer.

This is a very diverse land. The humidity, geography or society of the deep south are as different from New England as it from the often arid and vast spaces of the West. Places such as Alaska take that to a whole other level. Even with the internet, one can only begin to appreciate such realities from an armchair.

As with Afghanistan, only those actually having been there can best appreciate the realities. That goes for every state and local in the US. Whether Colorado or elsewhere, feet on the ground best informs the feel of personal chemistry.
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Old 07-10-2012, 06:46 AM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,867 posts, read 7,114,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
I take it geography isn't your best subject. But that's what you're here for... right?

Have you ever been to Arizona before? Or New Mexico? Or southern California? Climates in the western US are COMPLETELY different from the humid eastern US. The desert southwest is more comparable to the middle east or central Asia than it is to the deep south US. In the western US, elevation is the no 1 biggest determinant of climate/ termperatures, not latitude. Every single state in the western US has an extremely diverse climate that can range wildly. For example, Phoenix and Flagstaff are about two hours away, and are so different from one another it is comparable to going from Mexico to Canada in that 2 hour drive.

I just did some research on the location and climate of Kabul, Afghanistan. Kabul's latitude is at 34.5 N. That is roughly about the same latitude as Albuquerque, NM or Prescott, AZ or Barstow, CA. Elevation of Kabul is about 5,876 feet. That's about the same elevation as Denver or Albuquerque. Annual precipitation is about the same as Denver. Season precipitation, rain and snowfall patterns of Kabul look VERY similar to Reno or Salt Lake City. Temperatures look very similar to Reno. From looking at pictures, the mountains and physical geography of Kabul look very similar to the Great Basin-- much more like the Great Basin, actually, than the Rocky Mountains.

IMHO, the following cities (and surrounding regions) are places you need to seriously consider. Which one exactly depends on where you can find a job and exactly where you want to be on the climate spectrum. But all of these have dry, western climates, some of them with more snow than others, all of them are surrounded by mountains, and all of them are at approx 4-5k ft in elevation:

Albuquerque, NM
Salt Lake City, UT
Reno, NV
It's so similiar it's scary. I'll post some pictures, you'll swear its somewhere in Wyoming.
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Old 07-10-2012, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
818 posts, read 1,847,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
But, for the most part, those things are mutually exclusive. The mountain areas are very high cost-of-living, with a general paucity of decent-paying jobs. The relatively low cost of living areas of rural Colorado have few, if any jobs, and what are there don't generally pay well at all. That leaves the Front Range metro areas, which, if you read my earlier posts, would seem to have a climate not to the OP's liking.

That is kind of why I felt the OP should rank his wish list in order of importance, because there are some places that meet some of his requirements really well, but it's really hard to find a place that meets all of them. Posters here have mentioned the Upper Midwest, which is good if the OP's desire for mountains is not a high priority. Others have now mentioned Montana/Idaho/inland Washington, that would be good if the OP's desire to be within a reasonable drive of a large metropolitan area is not a high priority.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:37 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,065,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CybrSlydr View Post
I've not been to any of those states. I never looked into those states precisely because they're "desert" - I like cool-cold with precipitation. I like what most people hate. lol I love season-long snow coverage, I love when it rains... Partly cloudy days are spectacular.

I was about an hour south of Kabul and the whole time I was there, it rained twice - this was from January to July. There rest of the time it was ugly hot in the sun. That's why I was avoiding the southern dry states like NM and NV.

Again, I just want to stress that I say I liked Afghanistan's weather in comparison to Louisiana - I didn't really like Afghanistan's weather but it was an improvement over Fort Polk!
You might want to look at Montana and Northern Idaho. I've always been impressed with the state and would like to spend more time there. I think it's more beautiful than Colorado and you'll have plenty of cold and if you go high enough up in elevation, plenty of snow and rain as well.
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Old 09-13-2016, 05:03 AM
 
Location: Seattle
16 posts, read 38,301 times
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My husband and I are planning to retire to Colorado. We currently live in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where the elevation is only about 1500 feet. We are hoping to find some property in the northwest quadrant of Colorado to build on. I'm looking for a city/county that has cool summers (below 80 average, if possible), and I see that most of the places there with cooler summers are at the higher elevations (over 8000 feet). My question is this: Does the body become accustomed to higher altitudes easily? I've read about elevation sickness and I'm a little nervous. Some of the places I'm seeing with affordable property include Florissant, Guffey, Hartsel, Kremmling, Lake George, Parshall, and a few others. Can someone offer me any advice about the elevation adjustment and/or and thoughts about the cities I've listed? Thank you so much!
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Old 09-13-2016, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Beverly, OH
53 posts, read 79,297 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by autumnsky45 View Post
My husband and I are planning to retire to Colorado. We currently live in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where the elevation is only about 1500 feet. We are hoping to find some property in the northwest quadrant of Colorado to build on. I'm looking for a city/county that has cool summers (below 80 average, if possible), and I see that most of the places there with cooler summers are at the higher elevations (over 8000 feet). My question is this: Does the body become accustomed to higher altitudes easily? I've read about elevation sickness and I'm a little nervous. Some of the places I'm seeing with affordable property include Florissant, Guffey, Hartsel, Kremmling, Lake George, Parshall, and a few others. Can someone offer me any advice about the elevation adjustment and/or and thoughts about the cities I've listed? Thank you so much!
When I was in the Army, I was stationed at Fort Polk in Louisiana. That's about as close to sea-level as you're going to get. I was then deployed to Afghanistan where our base was about 6000ft ASL.

Yes, you're going to definitely notice a difference when making that kind of elevation jump but the body does adjust. At first, just going up slight hills is going to completely SUCK. I remember while on foot patrol not being able to go up a 15ft hill with a decent incline without having to pause and suck down air.

The more level ground you walk around on, the less you will notice it. They told us that because of how much we would be exerting it would take anywhere from 4-6wks to completely acclimatize. This is while carrying a 20lb weapon and over 100lbs of armor and gear.

For you, it might take a couple weeks or less.

Human Biological Adaptability: Adapting to High Altitude
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Old 09-13-2016, 08:14 AM
 
794 posts, read 1,501,687 times
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There are good threads on altitude sickness on this and other forums, as well as recent threads on both Guffey and Florissant, and some not too terribly old on Kremmling. The search feature can be a real help to you in getting background information.

The short story of altitude sickness is that, yes, you will get acclimated within a few weeks or a couple of months. Unless you never do (some people don't).

The communities you have listed are substantially different in character, geography, and climate. Perhaps you could identify some of the things you hope to gain from this move so that we can give you better answers.
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