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Old 07-27-2012, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Colorado
659 posts, read 772,854 times
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It's in Pueblo, won't be long until it spreads all over.
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Old 07-27-2012, 03:58 PM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,625,930 times
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Already here in COS.
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:20 AM
 
12,866 posts, read 24,560,022 times
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I thought that was a common illness, with rabbits being the major vector?
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:21 AM
 
12,866 posts, read 24,560,022 times
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Sorry- what I meant was, I thought it was already "all over" in rabbit populations.
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Old 07-28-2012, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,105 posts, read 20,401,913 times
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It happens every so often in this part of the country. Why they tell us to always watch our animals and one reason I do not let my cat outside at all.
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Old 07-28-2012, 04:10 PM
 
122 posts, read 167,804 times
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I believe I came across this while reading about field-dressing rabbits - If the liver is spotted, then immediately discard the carcass and do not consume it.

Quote:
the Pueblo City-County Health Department recommends avoiding areas where ticks or wild rodents live.
So in other words, never go outside? Great advice. It might have actually been helpful if they discussed proper preparation when going into wooded areas and how to check yourself & your companions for ticks.

Quote:
It is not transmitted from person to person.
It may have symptoms similar to the plague, but it certainly won't spread like the plague. Though I have no doubt that local media will certainly put out stories covering the "Tularemia epidemic" once 2-3 cases are reported.
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Old 07-29-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,057 posts, read 99,087,775 times
Reputation: 31544
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I thought that was a common illness, with rabbits being the major vector?
That is my understanding as well. But what would we know? We're health care professionals!
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:05 AM
 
565 posts, read 1,078,539 times
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^^Uh, yeah.


Anyway, what do you guys do about preventing this from transmitting to your dog?

My dog is currently on Comfortis, just for the fleas in San Diego, and was hoping to get him off it when we move out to CO. I'm guessing it's keep him on Comfortis to prevent ticks and this damn disease...
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Old 07-30-2012, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 12,554,586 times
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Tularemia can be found anywhere.
Dogs appear to be fairly resistant to the disease and the only symptoms may be loss of appetite, listlessness, and a low fever. Cats are more susceptible and may develop high fevers and swollen lymph nodes. Puppies and kittens are usually more severely affected than older animals.

Tularemia is a relatively rare bacterial disease of birds, animals, and people and is found throughout the Northern Hemisphere. It is also called 'rabbit fever.

In North America, F. tularensis is spread from animal to animal by four different ticks: Dermacentor andersoni, D. variabilis, D. occidentalis, and Amblyomma americanum. Ticks become infected through feeding on infected animals or birds and can transmit the bacteria to another animal any time during the tick's life cycle (2 years). Fleas, like ticks, can transmit tularemia because of their feeding habits. Dogs and cats can also become infected by eating infected rabbits or rodents.

The best antibiotic to use to treat tularemia in dogs has not been determined. In people gentamicin and streptomycin are used. Newer antibiotics such as enrofloxican(Baytril) and ciprofloxacin may be effective.
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