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Old 08-01-2012, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Mount Pleasant, Michigan
7 posts, read 12,855 times
Reputation: 26

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Hello everyone,

This is my first post here, although I must say that I have been using city-data for a long time, and it has always been a valuable resource.

In a few days, I will be moving from Arizona to Lansing, Michigan. The standard routes tell me that I should drive to New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and from there, go north, so as to avoid the Continental Divide, or at least the highest part of it.

To be frank, I have driven through Texas, and I don't particularly like the drive; I am in Arizona, so I know the desert, and Texas is even more boring. Moreover, this time of the year (early August) is prime time for monsoon storms and tornadoes all throughout that area (Texas, OK, MO, IN, etc.), so it is not exactly safe.

I was thinking about going north from Arizona to I-70, and take it all the way to Denver, where I would take 76 and I-80 past Omaha and all the way to Illinois. If I had a regular car, I wouldn't even be asking (I would probably go through the San Juan National Forest or some other similar route). However, I will be driving a loaded 16 or 17' Budget truck, and I-70 from West to East worries me. Has any of you undertaken a similar trip with a moving truck?

Any input will be greatly appreciated. Warm regards.

Robert
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Old 08-01-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,222 posts, read 6,992,930 times
Reputation: 6603
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmendoza58 View Post
Hello everyone,

This is my first post here, although I must say that I have been using city-data for a long time, and it has always been a valuable resource.

In a few days, I will be moving from Arizona to Lansing, Michigan. The standard routes tell me that I should drive to New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and from there, go north, so as to avoid the Continental Divide, or at least the highest part of it.

To be frank, I have driven through Texas, and I don't particularly like the drive; I am in Arizona, so I know the desert, and Texas is even more boring. Moreover, this time of the year (early August) is prime time for monsoon storms and tornadoes all throughout that area (Texas, OK, MO, IN, etc.), so it is not exactly safe.

I was thinking about going north from Arizona to I-70, and take it all the way to Denver, where I would take 76 and I-80 past Omaha and all the way to Illinois. If I had a regular car, I wouldn't even be asking (I would probably go through the San Juan National Forest or some other similar route). However, I will be driving a loaded 16 or 17' Budget truck, and I-70 from West to East worries me. Has any of you undertaken a similar trip with a moving truck?

Any input will be greatly appreciated. Warm regards.

Robert
************************************************** *************
Knowing your starting point in Arizona would be a big help. If you are starting in Southern Arizona and plan to take I-10 across Texas in August I would advise avoiding that route. Too darn hot in August. Get to I-40 and head East to Oklahoma City and then North via I-35 to Kansas City or I-44 to St. Louis. From St. Louis take your pick. FWIW August is NOT the month when tornadoes are most prevalent in any of the states you mentioned.

I-70 across Colorado in even a small rental truck you are not familiar with is tricky if you have ZERO experience in driving a truck. Have a safe trip. Oh BTW, I drove big rigs for over twenty years.

GL2
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,034,362 times
Reputation: 7701
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmendoza58 View Post
Hello everyone,

This is my first post here, although I must say that I have been using city-data for a long time, and it has always been a valuable resource.

In a few days, I will be moving from Arizona to Lansing, Michigan. The standard routes tell me that I should drive to New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and from there, go north, so as to avoid the Continental Divide, or at least the highest part of it.

To be frank, I have driven through Texas, and I don't particularly like the drive; I am in Arizona, so I know the desert, and Texas is even more boring. Moreover, this time of the year (early August) is prime time for monsoon storms and tornadoes all throughout that area (Texas, OK, MO, IN, etc.), so it is not exactly safe.

I was thinking about going north from Arizona to I-70, and take it all the way to Denver, where I would take 76 and I-80 past Omaha and all the way to Illinois. If I had a regular car, I wouldn't even be asking (I would probably go through the San Juan National Forest or some other similar route). However, I will be driving a loaded 16 or 17' Budget truck, and I-70 from West to East worries me. Has any of you undertaken a similar trip with a moving truck?

Any input will be greatly appreciated. Warm regards.

Robert

Are you talking about picking up I-70 in Utah and going east to Denver? If so, I hope you know how to drive that thing in the mountains.
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:06 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,021,080 times
Reputation: 7537
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmendoza58 View Post

I was thinking about going north from Arizona to I-70, and take it all the way to Denver, where I would take 76 and I-80 past Omaha and all the way to Illinois. If I had a regular car, I wouldn't even be asking (I would probably go through the San Juan National Forest or some other similar route). However, I will be driving a loaded 16 or 17' Budget truck, and I-70 from West to East worries me. Has any of you undertaken a similar trip with a moving truck?

Any input will be greatly appreciated. Warm regards.

Robert
Wouldn't do it if I was you. I drove I-70 to Denver from the mountains almost every day in summer and broken down rental trucks were common.

The other issue is at the Tunnel at 11,100 feet. If you don't slow and gear down coming out of the tunnel, you'll turn into a cannonball coming down the hill. A lot of inexperienced people pop out of the tunnel too fast, ride their brakes down, burn them up and then end up splattered on the road.

The problem with those rental trucks is you don't know how well they have been maintained, whereas someone who drives a vehicle on that road frequently in the same vehicle would be familiar with their maintenance. Hence I would not want to drive a fully loaded rental truck down some of those hills and hope it works out.

Plenty of people do it though, but you better be prepared for a few long climbs and descents in elevation.

What I would do is take I-15 up to SLC and then hook up to I-80 and take that east through Utah and Wyoming into Nebraska.
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,034,362 times
Reputation: 7701
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Wouldn't do it if I was you. I drove I-70 to Denver from the mountains almost every day in summer and broken down rental trucks were common.

The other issue is at the Tunnel at 11,100 feet. If you don't slow and gear down coming out of the tunnel, you'll turn into a cannonball coming down the hill. A lot of inexperienced people pop out of the tunnel too fast, ride their brakes down, burn them up and then end up splattered on the road.

The problem with those rental trucks is you don't know how well they have been maintained, whereas someone who drives a vehicle on that road frequently in the same vehicle would be familiar with their maintenance. Hence I would not want to drive a fully loaded rental truck down some of those hills and hope it works out.

Plenty of people do it though, but you better be prepared for a few long climbs and descents in elevation.

What I would do is take I-15 up to SLC and then hook up to I-80 and take that east through Utah and Wyoming into Nebraska.

A better route would be to go on up I-15 a few miles to I-84 east. It avoids Parley's Summit and comes into I-80 near the Wyoming line.
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Old 08-01-2012, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Mount Pleasant, Michigan
7 posts, read 12,855 times
Reputation: 26
Default Thank you

First, I thank you for all the replies.

I am starting in Tucson, so I-15 is too far west, in the opposite direction where I need to go. The shortest route, as far as I can see, and one that avoids the big mountain passes, is I-10 to 85, north to Albuquerque, then East on 40 to OK City, then 44 to St. Louis, and so on.I think all of you are correct, however, and I-70 is too darn difficult to climb with a rental truck.

I was thinking of an alternate route that might save me from going through TX and Ok, and might also be a bit more "scenic": What do you think of taking I-25 north to Denver, then 76 and then 80 East? How much of a climb is it on 25? I have never taken I-25, so I don't know it. Again, any advice is welcome. Many thanks.

Robert
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:19 PM
 
794 posts, read 1,492,322 times
Reputation: 1163
I-25 is not as scenic as one might wish, but it certainly beats I-40. Your proposal adds about 100 miles, but realistically I would estimate three to four additional hours. That stretch from Santa Fe up towards Raton will be slow going. Raton pass is not a big deal and once in Trinidad your are on the prairie running parallel along the base of the front range.

Unless you are moving your lead soldier collection, a 16' rental truck should not cause any difficulty. Do watch your temperature gauge on the long climbs, though.
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,034,362 times
Reputation: 7701
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmendoza58 View Post
First, I thank you for all the replies.

I am starting in Tucson, so I-15 is too far west, in the opposite direction where I need to go. The shortest route, as far as I can see, and one that avoids the big mountain passes, is I-10 to 85, north to Albuquerque, then East on 40 to OK City, then 44 to St. Louis, and so on.I think all of you are correct, however, and I-70 is too darn difficult to climb with a rental truck.

I was thinking of an alternate route that might save me from going through TX and Ok, and might also be a bit more "scenic": What do you think of taking I-25 north to Denver, then 76 and then 80 East? How much of a climb is it on 25? I have never taken I-25, so I don't know it. Again, any advice is welcome. Many thanks.

Robert

The only climb you'd have on I-25 is at Raton Pass, on the NM line. It's about 3 or 4 miles up and 5 miles or so down, but it's mostly 5% or less. You shouldn't have an problems IF you gear down at the top for the first couple of miles.
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:23 PM
 
16,171 posts, read 20,180,588 times
Reputation: 46693
I've been on this road a few hundred thousand miles worth, regarding I-25. If you DO want to go this route, there are no problems. Raton pass has an elevation of 7834 ft. The town of Raton is a little over 6500 ft. on the New Mexico side and Trinidad's elevation is 6025 ft.. It's an easy drive, trust me. I worked on a Colo./New Mexico/Texas pipeline project in the 80's and I took a couple dozen pipeline workers over that pass dozens of times in an old '66 Greyhound bus. Piece of cake.

Don't underestimate the lack of scenery going I-25 into Colorado. When you get past the New Mexico port of entry you can see the sweeping view of the Sangre De Cristo mountains to the west, the Spanish peaks near Walsenburg, the Wet Mountain Range south of Pueblo, the famous Pikes Peak (14110 ft. elevation) and of course the Front Range mountains that go from Colorado Springs to Denver. No mountains east of you, but mountain range after mountain range west of you.

It's been 17 years since I took a rental truck through New Mexico, it would be a good idea to call the New Mexico state government to see if rental trucks are required to check in at the Port of Entry. Most states don't, but some states do. It would be a good idea to call them and check. The New Mexico and Colorado port of entries are maybe a dozen miles apart.
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,034,362 times
Reputation: 7701
One additional negative of that route is that you'll have to deal with the Chicago/NW Indiana traffic and it's brutal, any time day or night. And, it stays heavy all the way from there to Lansing.

You might consider I-10 to Dallas, I-30 to Little Rock, I-40 to West Memphis, I-55 to Sikeston, MO, I-57 to Effingham, IL, I-70 east to Indianapolis, then I-69 north right on into Lansing. That's how I would do it.
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