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Old 08-12-2012, 10:37 PM
 
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In both Idaho and Montana, it is similar to Colorado. There are three cultures just as in Colorado. 1)--City culture and attitude in populated areas. 2)--Farm culture where it is not cowboys but farmers and there is a big difference. 3)--Ranch culture where cattle reign supreme. There are a lot more leaning city culture, and farm culture, than there is a cowboy culture.

Most cowboys use a dirt bike or a ATV to ride fence lines rather than a horse, as one man on either one can do several times more work than cowboys riding horses. They heard cattle with an ATV today, instead of horses on larger spreads. It takes too much time to get to where the cattle are, or to get home on a horse. They stay connected by radio, so they can get more work done. Takes a lot less cowboys than in the past. When bailing hay for the winter, one man with a round bailer can put up more hay than a crew of 10 in the past. Instead of roping and throwing an animal to brand, neuter, medicate, etc., etc., smart ranchers run them into a squeeze chute and it takes a lot more men to handle a herd of cattle you are working on.

Cattle ranching has changed, and the cowboy culture of the past like it was when I grew up on a large ranch is no longer with us.
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Old 08-13-2012, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
Instead of roping and throwing an animal to brand, neuter, medicate, etc., etc., smart ranchers run them into a squeeze chute and it takes a lot more men to handle a herd of cattle you are working on.
Kind of a throwback to the old practice of rounding up. It was Texans who brought the practice to CO of riding out, roping and branding in place. Originally it was done more how it is now.
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
If I wanted to ranch near the mountains I'd look for something in Northern New Mexico. For one thing the winter weather's usually less extreme.
How north in Northern NM are you talking about? For instance the San Luis Valley down towards Santa Fe, or Raton and Las Vegas? Thanks for any info you can provide.
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
In both Idaho and Montana, it is similar to Colorado. There are three cultures just as in Colorado. 1)--City culture and attitude in populated areas. 2)--Farm culture where it is not cowboys but farmers and there is a big difference. 3)--Ranch culture where cattle reign supreme. There are a lot more leaning city culture, and farm culture, than there is a cowboy culture.

Most cowboys use a dirt bike or a ATV to ride fence lines rather than a horse, as one man on either one can do several times more work than cowboys riding horses. They heard cattle with an ATV today, instead of horses on larger spreads. It takes too much time to get to where the cattle are, or to get home on a horse. They stay connected by radio, so they can get more work done. Takes a lot less cowboys than in the past. When bailing hay for the winter, one man with a round bailer can put up more hay than a crew of 10 in the past. Instead of roping and throwing an animal to brand, neuter, medicate, etc., etc., smart ranchers run them into a squeeze chute and it takes a lot more men to handle a herd of cattle you are working on.

Cattle ranching has changed, and the cowboy culture of the past like it was when I grew up on a large ranch is no longer with us.

Yes, this is very well said indeed. To many, it is a sad development, to others, not so much. This is depending on which cultural standard you identify with of course.
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Old 08-14-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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Originally Posted by countryway View Post
Thanks for all the replies thus far! It seems resounded most commonly is the western slope area especially Craig, and down by Montrose and Delta. So I am looking into those places.
Craig, Montrose and Delta are out in the desert, rather than the mountains. If I personally were to do what you're doing, Collbran would be my first choice. Or even Mesa, Colorado, which is around the corner from Collbran. Both villages are small with a sense of community. If my aunt and uncle were looking to relocate, I would steer them that way, too.

I tried briefly to find my photos of the Collbran area, but unfortunately didn't encounter them. Instead here's a couple from Mesa.


Quote:
Originally Posted by countryway View Post
How north in Northern NM are you talking about? For instance the San Luis Valley down towards Santa Fe, or Raton and Las Vegas? Thanks for any info you can provide.
If you want to escape harsh winters the San Luis Valley is not the place.
Attached Thumbnails
Is There a Predominant Cowboy Culture in Colorado? If so, where? (Ranching, Equine, Western etc.)-mesa1.jpg   Is There a Predominant Cowboy Culture in Colorado? If so, where? (Ranching, Equine, Western etc.)-mesa2.jpg  
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Old 08-14-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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Originally Posted by countryway View Post
How north in Northern NM are you talking about? For instance the San Luis Valley down towards Santa Fe, or Raton and Las Vegas? Thanks for any info you can provide.
I was thinking further South between Taos, Santa Fe, and Las Vegas. I believe the San Luis Valley only extends 15 miles South of the CO/NM border so your question kind of threw me off.
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Old 08-15-2012, 07:53 PM
 
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I appreciate the plethora of replies and advice thus far. I am investigeting these areas mentioned. I will look into northern NM, north of Santa Fe, as well as southeastern CO.

I did some reseaerch and it seems like southeastern CO around La Junta and Pueblo area might be very good. We are talking about driving down and visiting. I am not sure if we can though. It would be nice to visit the western slope as well. We really don't want a desert though. I was under the impression that Delta through Montrose was grass and valley terrain rather than high desert. I know GJ is desert as Ive been there. Not a huge fan of desert areas. I lived in AZ for a while and just didn't care for it. Really like prairies, meadows, grasslands, trees, hills, etc. and of course mountains.

If you can describe the area around Montrose and Delta, that would be excellent or provide pictures. I have looked on Google, but didnt find satisfying pictures. Collbran, however had some pretty pictures and looked like it was ripe ranching country that would suit our desires, near mountains, with a cowboy culture as well.

Does anyone have anymore info on Durango area, as to whether it would suit? Thanks.

Thanks for all the info, I really appreciate it!
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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Originally Posted by countryway View Post
It would be nice to visit the western slope as well. We really don't want a desert though. I was under the impression that Delta through Montrose was grass and valley terrain rather than high desert. I know GJ is desert as Ive been there. Not a huge fan of desert areas.
The terrain in GJ, Montrose and Delta is all the same. All three of these towns are on the border of the Utah desert to the west (think Moab) and the upslope of the Rockies to the east. I wouldn't use the term grassland to describe any of the areas surrounding those towns. Plus in the spring you get these duststorms and wind coming from Utah.

Once you drive south of Montrose, you start getting into the Uncompahgre river valley which gradually starts getting more wooded and grassy as you head towards the San Juans.

Quote:

If you can describe the area around Montrose and Delta, that would be excellent or provide pictures.
When I used to live in Grand Junction, I used to go traipsing around those areas all the time, looking for fishing holes and hiking spots. Basically you have to head east about 20 miles both from Grand Junction or Delta to see change of terrain. So if you head east of Delta about 20 or 30 miles, you come into a town called Paonia and another called Crawford, both of which are located in the foothills and are quite pretty, with grasslands, ranches, etc. you should take a look at both those.

If you don't mind a very tiny village, check out Cimarron, colorado, it's about 30 miles east of Montrose in a VERY beautiful mountain valley. There must be all of, like, 10 families living in that area. I used to love driving through Cimarron, especially in the summer after a nice rain.

The thing you have to realize about the West is that terrain can change drastically just in a matter of several miles. It's all about the mountains, which affect the weather, or really should be said "gather" the weather.
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Old 08-16-2012, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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Originally Posted by countryway View Post
IDoes anyone have anymore info on Durango area, as to whether it would suit? Thanks.
It would suit but you'd pay a premium because Durango's a very popular retirement and tourism destination. You'd pay less the further away from town you get but quite a bit of land South of there is owned by the Ute Indians. Maybe look out around Cortez?

Durango's former "cowboy culture" has been pretty much overrun by the mountain bikers, tourists, and transplants with other interests (channeling Jazzlover here).

Last edited by CAVA1990; 08-16-2012 at 04:53 AM..
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Old 08-16-2012, 07:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Lived in Craig for 8 years growing up and as others have said it's probably the closest you're gonna get to the old west in Colorado. Browns Park in Western Moffat County was a haven for outlaws like Butch Cassidy in the late 1800s. Farming and ranching are huge in Northwestern Colorado. The Villard Ranch outside Craig was featured on an episode of Dirty Jobs. Mike Rowe got first-hand experience docking sheep and eating Rocky Mountain Oysters.
Agreed. The Craig area is probably your best bet here. I also agree with Jwiley (post#2) regarding Meeker and Rangely.

A few other towns worth considering here would be Walden, Kremmling, and a group of towns that get very little mention on this board; Dove Creek, Cahone, and Pleasant View which are northwest of Cortez.

Added one more -Westcliffe.

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 08-16-2012 at 09:24 AM..
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