U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-18-2012, 02:25 PM
 
3,309 posts, read 2,094,961 times
Reputation: 5052

Advertisements

CAVA1990 He said:

Quote:
I desire to live and work in the cowboy/western/ag/ranching/ lifestyle and environment. I grew up in an agriculture-based area and have had some experience with horses and livestock. I want to learn more and live where those traditions, lifestyles, and values are an integral part of life.

I have looked up and down the Front Range and though some of these areas partly embrace that lifestyle, I have not seen anything that is as purist as I desire.
As he says, what he has seen the ranches today only partly embrace the lifestyle. He is looking for the old way of ranching, that no longer exists. That is he can't find anything that is as purist as he wants.

As I lived the life he wants 70 years ago I understand what he is looking for. The new ranch life is not the same as it was back then, and it is only partly what it once was. It has changed greatly. As they have modernized other facets of life, they have modernized the way they ranch today. They still have cattle, and they still have to be handled and cared for, but and that is a big but, times have changed greatly and the way cattle are raised and handled on a ranch is no longer the same. Lots fewer people doing the work, and use different methods of doing it.

Today, ranchers and farmers understand computers, and how to compute a bottom line. You spot your fields from satellite images, to figure where more or less fertilizer is needed. It is much harder to turn a profit today from cattle than 50 years ago, and today's successful ranchers are more businessmen than they are the type of rancher that was successful 50 years ago.

He is looking for the purist cowboy life of the past as he says, and cannot find it. It is long gone, and will not be found.

I lived the old cowboy life until I was 18, and while spending 30 years as a commercial real estate broker in Colorado, I also understand the ranches of today as I had to study them to be able to sell them successfully. My father ranched till he died in 1966, and I watched him make the changes. He was very difficult to get to change certain things, but he did as it was the only way to survive running cattle. And it has come a long way since he left us.

As I lived it I understand what he is looking for, but my other experience shows me that old cowboy life (he calls purist) no longer exists.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-18-2012, 02:42 PM
 
17,389 posts, read 24,698,904 times
Reputation: 12772
OldTrader, thanks for the glimpse into the past....many of us idolize the "good old days" but in reality there was very little good about them... hardships, poverty, crookedness, disease, death. I think we idolize the PEOPLE who bested the odds and persevered through it all. My neighbor is from NE, her dad still raises cattle there, but he does it now via ATV as they're a hundred times less work than caring for horses, tack, vet bills, farrier costs, etc and a lot more productive of his time.

My own look back is at the old railroads that crisscrossed the nation and bound us together; those were days of backbreaking work, long hours, low pay, few benefits, danger and for many thousands of men - death. It's romantic to look back at those grizzled railroaders and their accomplishments, but it was a tough life and those guys were not sterling gentlemen.

I've dealt with the emotional issues of looking backwards, and though I appreciate those people for their hard work and dedication, I look fondly toward an even better future.

The old ranches and cowboys are gone, so are the old trains and railroaders. They can only be found in tiny, museum-like settings.

Eyes forward folks.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.

Last edited by Mike from back east; 08-18-2012 at 03:35 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 03:21 PM
 
4,674 posts, read 3,447,370 times
Reputation: 3744
Quote:
Originally Posted by countryway View Post
I am financially sustained at this time and have the ability to relocate, then look for work later. I have considered moving out of state to Wyoming, Montana and Idaho several times but have not been able to. My family likes it here as do I and would like to find a place more suitable. We prefer close proximity to the Rockies and would gladly live in them if there was the right community for my needs. Meaning, Eastern Colorado may suite this lifestyle, but if there were places in or near the Rockies (North, South, East or West) that would be preferable.
Just about any place in western Montana or Wyoming (except for Casper or Cheyenne) should be what you are looking for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 16,547,115 times
Reputation: 6483
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
CAVA1990 He said:



As he says, what he has seen the ranches today only partly embrace the lifestyle. He is looking for the old way of ranching, that no longer exists. That is he can't find anything that is as purist as he wants.

As I lived the life he wants 70 years ago I understand what he is looking for. The new ranch life is not the same as it was back then, and it is only partly what it once was. It has changed greatly. As they have modernized other facets of life, they have modernized the way they ranch today. They still have cattle, and they still have to be handled and cared for, but and that is a big but, times have changed greatly and the way cattle are raised and handled on a ranch is no longer the same. Lots fewer people doing the work, and use different methods of doing it.

Today, ranchers and farmers understand computers, and how to compute a bottom line. You spot your fields from satellite images, to figure where more or less fertilizer is needed. It is much harder to turn a profit today from cattle than 50 years ago, and today's successful ranchers are more businessmen than they are the type of rancher that was successful 50 years ago.

He is looking for the purist cowboy life of the past as he says, and cannot find it. It is long gone, and will not be found.

I lived the old cowboy life until I was 18, and while spending 30 years as a commercial real estate broker in Colorado, I also understand the ranches of today as I had to study them to be able to sell them successfully. My father ranched till he died in 1966, and I watched him make the changes. He was very difficult to get to change certain things, but he did as it was the only way to survive running cattle. And it has come a long way since he left us.

As I lived it I understand what he is looking for, but my other experience shows me that old cowboy life (he calls purist) no longer exists.
I think you're reading way too much into what he's looking for and seem to be projecting a lot of your own personal frustrations onto him. I worked on the railroad. I loved it partly because of its heritage but I recognized it wasn't the same as in the days of steam, though sometimes I imagined what it must have been like back then. However, that didn't make me love it or want to work on it any less.

Your post reminded me of my dad. His grandfather, whom he was very close to, was the quintessential cowboy growing up in Southern Colorado. He ended his cowboy career in the Santa Fe stockyards in Southern California. Though my dad was a very successful businessman I sometimes thought he'd have traded it all to have lived as his grandfather did in his younger days.

Last edited by CAVA1990; 08-18-2012 at 05:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 05:20 PM
 
3,766 posts, read 4,315,591 times
Reputation: 3869
countryway, check out La Veta. I haven't lived there for years, but it is worth a look for what you want. The huajatolla peaks are beautiful & there is a history of ranches in the area. Cuchara is a beautiful mountain town above La Veta & Stonewall is too. The geologic dikes or stonewalls in the area spoking down from the peaks make for interesting scenery.

Road trip time for you!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 16,547,115 times
Reputation: 6483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
OldTrader, thanks for the glimpse into the past....many of us idolize the "good old days" but in reality there was very little good about them... hardships, poverty, crookedness, disease, death..
Lack of antibiotics was a huge buzz kill back then.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 07:15 PM
 
952 posts, read 1,276,479 times
Reputation: 541
The Craig area is a good suggestion. If you look near Durango, and I probably wouldn't for what you want, I'd say look around Mancos. Delta seems like a decent option, at least compared to most of the state.

LaVeta might be good if you want nearby ranches and a small arts community. What it feels like would depend on exactly where you live and who you hang with.

If you looked at northern New Mexico, I'd look around Raton or down near Cimarron or Springer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 07:21 PM
 
17,389 posts, read 24,698,904 times
Reputation: 12772
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Lack of antibiotics was a huge buzz kill back then.
Amen to that. Not to mention very few vaccines, whooping cough, polio and TB running rampant.... yeah... good old days ... in memory only.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2012, 07:57 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
18,837 posts, read 17,557,356 times
Reputation: 18103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Amen to that. Not to mention very few vaccines, whooping cough, polio and TB running rampant.... yeah... good old days ... in memory only.
It's humbling to walk the old graveyards. Lot of graves of young kids that never saw a 3 month or 3 year Birthday.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2012, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 16,547,115 times
Reputation: 6483
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW Crow View Post
If you looked at northern New Mexico, I'd look around Raton or down near Cimarron or Springer.
I've always been partial to the area aound Truchas and Chimayo. Might be because of the food though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:54 PM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top