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Old 09-02-2012, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,259,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Depending on how big of a town you need....you might check out Cortez, it has a very "western" feel to it. Mesa Verde too. Durango isn't so much as it used to be 20 years ago. Mostly yuppie types there now.

20yrsinBranson
Durango's never been a ranching dominant town. Its original raison d'etre was to serve and supply the mining business.
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Old 09-04-2012, 08:12 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,527 posts, read 29,246,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Durango's never been a ranching dominant town. Its original raison d'etre was to serve and supply the mining business.
Hi folks. I live in Fort Collins and I am considering relocating somewhere more rural and agriculture-based in this state... namely a place with a dominant cowboy lifestyle.

This is what I was referring to when I mentioned Durango. Not anything about ranching.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 09-04-2012, 11:41 AM
 
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I agree Eastern CO has more of a cowboy culture. I spent some time out in Wray, CO near the Kansas border and it has a big farm/ranch community with an outdoors culture. Despite being more of a city girl I really liked their little downtown - some great food and fun local flair. I would definitely recommend.
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Old 09-04-2012, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,259,830 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Hi folks. I live in Fort Collins and I am considering relocating somewhere more rural and agriculture-based in this state... namely a place with a dominant cowboy lifestyle.

This is what I was referring to when I mentioned Durango. Not anything about ranching.

20yrsinBranson
Silly me - I generally associate cowboys, at least real ones, with ranching, at least since the end of open range operations. Granted many a rancher has lived in town there.
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Old 09-04-2012, 04:30 PM
 
307 posts, read 805,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Silly me - I generally associate cowboys, at least real ones, with ranching, at least since the end of open range operations. Granted many a rancher has lived in town there.
Exactly. I have never been to Durango, but I certainly am not wanting a yuppie or faux-cowboy culture. I definitely want the real deal. Cowboy culture, that is not "drugstore" based, is centered around ranching of one form or the other. I certainly love horses, and would love to live where there is a predominant horse culture of the western type. When I think of cowboy, it doesn't precisely have to be cattle ranching, but certainly can be horseman as well.
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Old 09-04-2012, 04:52 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,107,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by countryway View Post
Exactly. I have never been to Durango, but I certainly am not wanting a yuppie or faux-cowboy culture. I definitely want the real deal. Cowboy culture, that is not "drugstore" based, is centered around ranching of one form or the other. I certainly love horses, and would love to live where there is a predominant horse culture of the western type. When I think of cowboy, it doesn't precisely have to be cattle ranching, but certainly can be horseman as well.
I've been around a lot of ranch country and one of my favorite "true ranching" areas is the Sandhills of Nebraska. Huge operating ranches, lots of horses and cattle--populated by some of the nicest, most genuine people that you can find anywhere. Take a trip on US2 from west to east across the Sandhills and/or on US83 from south to north and see what I mean.

PS--One of the very best prime rib dinners that I ever ate was years ago at the sale yard in tiny Thedford, Nebraska. I think the place is gone now, but I sure remember that meal. I also remember the desk clerk at the then new motel in Thedford. She was a very sweet college-age rancher's daughter who grew up nearby, and one of the most beautiful young women that I had ever seen in my life.
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Old 09-04-2012, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,259,830 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by countryway View Post
Exactly. I have never been to Durango, but I certainly am not wanting a yuppie or faux-cowboy culture. I definitely want the real deal. Cowboy culture, that is not "drugstore" based, is centered around ranching of one form or the other. I certainly love horses, and would love to live where there is a predominant horse culture of the western type. When I think of cowboy, it doesn't precisely have to be cattle ranching, but certainly can be horseman as well.
Much of the land around there that's not been developed has been sold off to hobby ranchers since prices per acre have increased so much. Also, seems that the livestock business in those parts changed from cattle to sheep quite awhile back so it's probably more a sheepman than cowboy culture outside of town. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
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Old 09-04-2012, 07:10 PM
 
Location: CO
2,533 posts, read 5,819,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Much of the land around there that's not been developed has been sold off to hobby ranchers since prices per acre have increased so much. Also, seems that the livestock business in those parts changed from cattle to sheep quite awhile back so it's probably more a sheepman than cowboy culture outside of town. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
And the cowman and the farmer should be friends, with apologies to Oklahoma.
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Old 09-05-2012, 12:53 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,839,172 times
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Wink Variations of *cowboy*

There are cowboys, and then there are cowboys.

One area of Colorado that still retains the real deal to an extent is in the San Luis Valley in the far south-central portion of the state. Not all are cowboys per se, being primarily an agricultural area versus beef, but still with families who are more than familiar with hard physical labor. It is a lifestyle and outlook a world apart from any wannabe cowboy.

However that region is relatively isolated, and if closer to South Fork then a good long drive to where most services are, such as Walmart in Alamosa. That would go for most of the ranches and farms in the area, Saguache or elsewhere: long distances to the "big city." Which is one reason why such an economy and its lifestyle still exists, instead of being subsumed by suburbia. Insofar as South Fork is concerned, it has gone slightly upscale of late, and in town and an extent the immediate area the retired and tourism provide most of the money. But there are still real spreads close by, so more a mix; other areas of Colorado, and the SLV, can be predominantly more one than the other.

But when one's focus is more on decent hospitals and relative ease of access to goods and services, then aspirations towards being a true cowboy tend to dissolve. That type tends to thrive best where "civilization" is at certain good remove, and likely to stay that way.

One can find plenty of conservative values in the vicinity of Colorado Springs—unless making the tragic error of having their world view thoroughly upset and challenged in such a heathen tourist favorite as Manitou Springs. But one should realize that Christian conservative does not necessarily translate into bedrock values shaped more by the land and a life within it. Perhaps not at all, as there can be a chasm between that urban and rural. Even those with a horse or two in residence may not appreciate how far apart: as a distinct difference between a hobby and pet versus all that constitutes a life—and what puts food on the table. Thus the source of income would be one defining factor. The viewpoint is just not the same; with the least familiarity, one will shortly know if speaking to someone who walks the walk, and the real deal.

Although it is possible to make certain compromises. One area in this regard could be the region roughly between CO 66 and US 34, or that of Lyons to Loveland along the Front Range. Most obviously, anyone there would enjoy relatively easy access to more major towns and all their many services; even fairly easily into Denver. Yet any drive between the two on the often confusing two-land backroads will quickly convince one that this is cowboy country. Or at least that anything but urban: more like mini ranches of a few acres each, a good many with horses and pretensions of a happy home on the range. From a lot of these spreads one could conceivably commute to work in a place such as Loveland, yet once home have the neighbors at something of a decent remove. It seems the type of place where the larger properties have slowly been whittled in size, yet the prevailing attitude is not much different than Wyoming.

Only of course one is not there, for both good and bad, depending on how one looks at it. The advantage of such a place in Colorado is—with a decent income—one can enjoy a semblance of ranch life without many of the inconveniences. Whereas if really in Wyoming or really out there on a distant spread—well, then certain hard realities intrude. That might be worth it, or all some would want. But as well why many others will never be found in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming, or as they see it the good sense to never be more than a few miles from Boulder on a well marked trail, with GPS.

Last edited by Idunn; 09-05-2012 at 01:18 AM..
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Old 09-13-2012, 07:14 PM
 
307 posts, read 805,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I've been around a lot of ranch country and one of my favorite "true ranching" areas is the Sandhills of Nebraska. Huge operating ranches, lots of horses and cattle--populated by some of the nicest, most genuine people that you can find anywhere. Take a trip on US2 from west to east across the Sandhills and/or on US83 from south to north and see what I mean.

PS--One of the very best prime rib dinners that I ever ate was years ago at the sale yard in tiny Thedford, Nebraska. I think the place is gone now, but I sure remember that meal. I also remember the desk clerk at the then new motel in Thedford. She was a very sweet college-age rancher's daughter who grew up nearby, and one of the most beautiful young women that I had ever seen in my life.
Yes, I have heard the Sandhills are a great place for that culture as well.
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