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Old 08-20-2012, 05:15 PM
 
155 posts, read 329,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rushhournewb View Post
I think she meant to say that her husband thinks that her driving will be treacherous in Denver.
LOL! Exactly right. Albeit he's just a big chicken anyway, he thinks mountain driving or driving in snow is treacherous, I think I'll get used to it. He worries about me; it's sweet most of the time... :-/ )
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Old 08-20-2012, 06:10 PM
 
155 posts, read 329,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idlewile View Post
Drivers in CO are average -- not great, not bad.

Drivers in TX are worse than anywhere else I've ever driven extensively - including NYC, SF, LA, Atlanta, Boston and Denver. It's absurd, frankly. It's embarrassing. (Anecdotally, I saw 4 fender benders in a 6 miles stretch today alone. Two days ago, I saw 3 fender benders within a 1.5 stretch.)

TX drivers fall into two categories which I have written about on C-D often , 1) Dangerously aggressive and 2) I-got-my-permit-yesterday and have never heard of 'rules of the road'.

Drivers in TX are scared to death when it rains and it SHOWS.

Roads and signage in CO are considerably better than TX. Monkeys decide what signs to put up on the highways in TX and where.

Driving in "weather" in CO - snow or ice, or snow with ice - is an artform and most do it well and are well-studied in it and don't give it a second thought. My advice to you is you had better get some practice in otherwise if you are forced to drive in not-so-great conditions you may need a Xanax when your car keeps going long after you've hit the brakes. I say this based on your (or your husband's) description of your ability (and fear?).

Also, some don't need an AWD car in bad weather areas, but for those who may need a bit more out of their car if their ability is lacking OR you commute a distance (like I did) AWD makes a huge diference in ice, and to some extent, snow (although good snow tires can help a lot on their own). Further, even if you're a stellar weather driver, an AWD car will handle better and is more enjoyable to drive in slick conditions... I don't care what all you Civic-loving fools say, they don't corner like they're on rails -- especially in bad weather.
I'm not a terrified driver, but my husband is! I learned to drive in downtown Dallas when I lived there. THAT is an accomplishment.

And as for AWD, does that stand for all wheel drive? I don't believe my small SUV is AWD, but it's a great vehicle! My DH is convinced I'll need an AWD though to live there...ha ha ha!
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Old 08-20-2012, 06:44 PM
 
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I need AWD. Our driveway has a slope that my spouse's 2WD car can't get up a few times a year when there is snow and ice but has never been a problem for my AWD SUV. Often if a big storm is predicted the bus is used for commuting or my AWD is used instead. Also if one wants to go on forest service roads into the national forest it can be handy in muddy or sometimes dry conditions as I have seen 2WD cars just spinning their wheels in the dust on rough roads when their wheels get caught in a rut. I also like having the availability of AWD if I needed to get to an emergency room or vet hospital in a snow storm as I feel I'm less likely to slide off the road.

Last edited by mic111; 08-20-2012 at 06:54 PM..
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Old 08-20-2012, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Southeastern Colorado
319 posts, read 620,358 times
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Most people are speaking to the question of winter/snow driving, though a few words about mountain driving appear to be in order. There are some issues here, including those that occur (1) when the driver is spellbound by the phenomenal scenery in both the foreground and the background and begins to steer erratically; (2) when aforementioned drivers suddenly slow to a crawl, which piles up a line of vehicles behind; (3) inexperienced drivers on switchbacks, who invariably swing wide; (4) older cars or giant RVs who lug up a hill or mountain (see #2); (5) drivers of cars/trucks who have never learned that braking on every curve or all the way down a mountain pass should not be necessary if one learns about downshifting to a lower gear-- even with automatic transmission; (6) drivers of cars/trucks who have never learned that careening down a mountain pass without using the brakes or the gears or the gas may seem like a fun idea, but portends a loss of control; and (7) slow-moving drivers who never ever consider that pulling off safely (when the shoulder allows it) so that others can pass, is a courteous and smart move.

However, as the OP indicated, people learn by doing and gain experience in all sorts of conditions, and hopefully improve as time goes by. There is no shame in going a bit slower in the right lane, pulling off (safely) in the midst of a sudden deluge of rain or hail, or pulling into a motel if the snow has simultaneously wiped out your visibility, your traction, and your courage. Your fellow road warriors will appreciate it.

So, is the OP's husband a perfect driver in all conditions?

Last edited by bovinedivine; 08-20-2012 at 10:07 PM.. Reason: clarity
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Old 08-21-2012, 06:16 AM
 
155 posts, read 329,206 times
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Ahh! That is a bit of information I'm looking for. That has much to do with my husband's concern, and helped ease mine.

I have no experience mountain driving, but perhaps I should mention my life in deep east Texas. My path to a job is windy, narrow, and even has a couple of decent views. Lucky, I can drive sharp curves with the best of them! And my car is decidedly a whippersnapper, being a mere two years old. This things are in my favor.

Weather? Not so much. A motel and friendly pulling off the side of the road might be necessary for a bit. And those views are sure to distract me some--but naturally, they also warrent a pull-over! Moment.

The husband? He's an "overly cautious" person in general. He stinks at driving in city traffic, but think's I drive through it like a lunatic. I prefer to think that I'm just smart and know HOW to drive in the city. If you aren't a bit aggressive other drivers get mad at you. You can't be Mr. Pokey.

Alas, he must get over his concern anyway.
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Old 08-21-2012, 09:11 AM
 
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Anybody can drive in the mountains--relatively few can do it well and safely, though. Same with winter conditions. It is very much a skill that requires experience, plus training from someone who knows to do it right. In my case, I had a father who was probably one of the best mountain and winter drivers in the country. I learned a lot from him, and have added over 40 years of my own experience to that since. The two worst type of mountain/winter drivers are a) the people who don't have any direct knowledge or experience with it; or b) the people who have some experience, but think that they know everything. Both are the type that can wind up upside down in the ditch, or endanger or injure or kill either themselves or other innocent drivers that they hit when conditions exceed their abilities to cope with them.
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Old 08-21-2012, 10:30 AM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,026,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaynaKH View Post
I have no experience mountain driving, but perhaps I should mention my life in deep east Texas. My path to a job is windy, narrow, and even has a couple of decent views. Lucky, I can drive sharp curves with the best of them! And my car is decidedly a whippersnapper, being a mere two years old. This things are in my favor.
Texas has nothing on Colorado. You mess up a corner in a lot of places in Colorado and that's the end of you. Things are not in your favor because you underestimate the conditions and the roads.

In Colorado you have extremely harsh weather, rocks, wildlife, steep drop offs, wind, big elevation changes up and down, unpredictable road surfaces and camber and well as other crazy drivers and commercial vehicles.

I drove 600K miles over 7 years between Aspen and Denver and all mountain points in between. I saw a lot of people die on the roads and some days I would see over 50 individual accidents, including many that happened right in front of me. In my opinion, most of those accidents were preventable if people had not overestimated their own driving abilities and their car's as well.
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Old 08-21-2012, 05:27 PM
 
155 posts, read 329,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Texas has nothing on Colorado. You mess up a corner in a lot of places in Colorado and that's the end of you. Things are not in your favor because you underestimate the conditions and the roads.

In Colorado you have extremely harsh weather, rocks, wildlife, steep drop offs, wind, big elevation changes up and down, unpredictable road surfaces and camber and well as other crazy drivers and commercial vehicles.

I drove 600K miles over 7 years between Aspen and Denver and all mountain points in between. I saw a lot of people die on the roads and some days I would see over 50 individual accidents, including many that happened right in front of me. In my opinion, most of those accidents were preventable if people had not overestimated their own driving abilities and their car's as well.
Ah, I seem to have forgotten rule number one of forum posting: Tone is not usually conveyed well. :-/

Most of my previous post is in direct relation to the one above it.

That being said, one wrong move on many of the back roads in East Texas (especially in these deep piney woods) is also the end of you. We may not have a mile to fall, but 60 mph+missing a curve+huge pine tree=many deaths. These roads, too, shouldn't be underestimated.

By no means does this mean I'll be a "natural" on Colorado mountain roads. It does mean I can carefully drive around curves. Two different animals entirely. My original post was in relation to that comment, and was meant to be slightly facetious.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:42 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,107,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaynaKH View Post
Ah, I seem to have forgotten rule number one of forum posting: Tone is not usually conveyed well. :-/

Most of my previous post is in direct relation to the one above it.

That being said, one wrong move on many of the back roads in East Texas (especially in these deep piney woods) is also the end of you. We may not have a mile to fall, but 60 mph+missing a curve+huge pine tree=many deaths. These roads, too, shouldn't be underestimated.
Not to put too fine a point on it, but there are no highways in Texas like this:



(US550 south of Ouray)

Yes, it is a US Highway used by semis and regular traffic, in addition to tourists--all year-round.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:55 AM
 
16,178 posts, read 20,188,186 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaynaKH View Post
Ah, I seem to have forgotten rule number one of forum posting: Tone is not usually conveyed well. :-/

Most of my previous post is in direct relation to the one above it.

That being said, one wrong move on many of the back roads in East Texas (especially in these deep piney woods) is also the end of you. We may not have a mile to fall, but 60 mph+missing a curve+huge pine tree=many deaths. These roads, too, shouldn't be underestimated.
Agreed. I've been on some of those roads, definitely a different type of hazard.

Another hazard you run into when you are going on that highway that Jazzlover posted on is rocks. We're in the middle of the monsoon season; sadly this year we're not getting the moisture we've had from previous years. But four years ago there was a fatality in that area. After a heavy rain a rock the size of a basketball went through the top of a rag top Jeep, hitting the driver and killing him. The only reason the jeep didn't go off the embankment is that the passenger had presence of mind to pull the emergency brake and turn the wheel.

I pick my times whenever I go through the area because I know what damage even small rocks can do, particularly the windshield. One time a couple decades ago I had a rock shaped like a dictionary suddenly land in the truck bed of my '77 Dodge. It could easily have gone through the moon roof. I was lucky.
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