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Old 08-26-2012, 03:16 PM
 
20,315 posts, read 37,826,095 times
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This thread has devolved into stupidity.

I've driven all over the country, save for Alaska.

Driving in most of Colorado is NO BIG DEAL.

Driving in the Colorado mountains doesn't take a trained Army Ranger with a half-track.

There are cork-screw roads with drop offs in the WV mountains that also have no guardrails; one can get killed by a 40-foot WV dropoff just as easily as a 400-foot CO dropoff. I've seen people I know get killed in DC just by driving off a level road into a thicket of trees (in the night, after drinking).

Driving on unpaved roads here is no different from the unpaved roads elsewhere. It's a road, drive within the accepted envelope of safety relative to speed, sobriety, weather, and other conditions.

The weather gets cold elsewhere too, in COLO is just a matter of "degree" (no pun intended).

In Colorado the dropoffs are deeper, the winds stronger, the nights darker, the temperatures way lower, the snow deeper and weather changes can come quickly and at most any time, especially in the high country. But decent drivers who drive safely, and who know the inherent factors of driving in the high country will do fine.

Driving in the Pueblo to Fort Collins Front Range areas is the same as any metropolis.

Driving in the eastern plains is subject to cross-winds and blowing snow/whiteouts, but that can happen all over the great plains and many other areas too. Sensible drivers, anywhere, have no reason to be fearful, just respectful of realities.
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Old 08-26-2012, 07:18 PM
 
155 posts, read 329,437 times
Reputation: 160
Thank you everyone for your input! I'm sorry I've been away, I'm currently a teacher and school starts tomorrow... It's been a busy week. :-/

As for driving, I'm sure I will learn. It's what I thought when I started this thread.

It is good to know WHY Colorado's roads are scarier--but it appears driving rules still apply. Nothing special save learning to drive on ice (which I can conviently take a class for). Dark, quick weather changes (I thought Texas weather was a little crazy) and other factors are different, but are such that one will get used to them and learn to take the challenges.

Makes me feel better. Thanks all for their responses!
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Old 08-26-2012, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,463,186 times
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Driving in Colorado has been easier than driving in other places I have lived in the past 35 years, mostly because I live in a lightly populated area with usually light traffic. For me anyway, light traffic on mediocre roads makes for easier driving than heavy traffic on good roads.
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Old 08-29-2012, 10:41 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,116,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Driving in Colorado has been easier than driving in other places I have lived in the past 35 years, mostly because I live in a lightly populated area with usually light traffic. For me anyway, light traffic on mediocre roads makes for easier driving than heavy traffic on good roads.
That is because it is possible for people to be idiots on even best roads--and the more traffic, the more idiots. (By the way, for whatever reason, I-70 between Denver and Grand Junction seems to be a complete magnet for idiot drivers, both local and tourist.)
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Old 08-29-2012, 08:44 PM
 
155 posts, read 329,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
That is because it is possible for people to be idiots on even best roads--and the more traffic, the more idiots. (By the way, for whatever reason, I-70 between Denver and Grand Junction seems to be a complete magnet for idiot drivers, both local and tourist.)
The other day, here in Texas, on my way to work, I had a dump truck drop a load of dirt at the end of our road. At 7:30 am. Not only was I stranded for nearly a half hour. But I also had to wait for a bulldozer to push the dirt around. I was late to work thanks to those idiots. LOL!

Random anecdote, I know. Hopefully, the idiots aren't quite as bad over there... From what I've been reading here, Texas has one of the biggest influxes of idiots around.

I concurr. Therefor I'm changing states. LOL!
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Old 08-31-2012, 05:50 PM
 
124 posts, read 126,350 times
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Default offroad grade question

Anyone know why the law/common practice regarding a single lane road gives right of way to the uphill vehicle over the one headed downhill if there is not enough enough room for them to pass each other? (ie the downhill vehicle is the one to backup to a point wide enough to pass)

I realize one must have priority, but it would seem like with the majority of the vehicles on the road being rear wheel drive, the one headed uphill would have better traction backing up (let gravity propel the vehicle) rather than the downhill having to overcome gravity in reverse (less weight on the rear drive wheels) and be more likely to spin.

Are brakes (particularly drums) less effective in reverse ?

The other issue would be the situation where the vehicle going uphill just doesn't have the power to climb the grade - would this be an exception to the rule since their only option is to back down ?
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,463,186 times
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DynaKH wrote: From what I've been reading here, Texas has one of the biggest influxes of idiots around.

I concurr. Therefor I'm changing states. LOL!

Remember, wherever you go, there you are! If you are attracting idiots into your life in Texas, chances are that you will be attracting idiots in Colorado as well. The law of attraction cannot be negated by changing location.
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Old 08-31-2012, 09:00 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,116,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edmiii View Post
Anyone know why the law/common practice regarding a single lane road gives right of way to the uphill vehicle over the one headed downhill if there is not enough enough room for them to pass each other? (ie the downhill vehicle is the one to backup to a point wide enough to pass)

I realize one must have priority, but it would seem like with the majority of the vehicles on the road being rear wheel drive, the one headed uphill would have better traction backing up (let gravity propel the vehicle) rather than the downhill having to overcome gravity in reverse (less weight on the rear drive wheels) and be more likely to spin.

Are brakes (particularly drums) less effective in reverse ?

The other issue would be the situation where the vehicle going uphill just doesn't have the power to climb the grade - would this be an exception to the rule since their only option is to back down ?
The short answer is that backing a vehicle down a steep downgrade in an off-road situation can be very tricky. Most of the weight is off of the front wheels when backing downgrade, so applying the brakes may cause the front wheels to lock up, leading to the loss of steering control. Giving the uphill vehicle the right-of-way also allowed the vehicle going upgrade the opportunity to maintain momentum, while the downhill vehicle could use gravity to get rolling again. To this day, when I'm heading downgrade on a one-track 4WD trail, I try to anticipate when I will need to pull over for uphill traffic so that I don't have to back up. And, if I'm going uphill and it is easier for me to pull off for a downhill vehicle than it is for him to pull off (or have to back up) for me, I will do it.

Also, back in the old days of 4WD, reverse was often the lowest gear in the vehicle, so backing upgrade could be done at the slowest speed--slow enough to be able to back safely when rear vision was limited. In fact, I remember old-timers in 4WD's turning the vehicle around and backing uphill if they stalled out going forward. Also, in those days before in-tank fuel pumps, backing up would allow gravity to help get fuel to the carburetor. There are many ways that the old 4WD's were much tougher and off-road capable than today's vehicles, but modern fuel pumps and electronic fuel injection systems are wonderful compared to the old carburetors and fuel pumps. Where many of today's 4WD's fall way short is because of inadequate running ground clearance and insufficient low gearing for backcountry 4-wheeling.
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Old 09-01-2012, 03:02 PM
 
352 posts, read 564,828 times
Reputation: 306
Yes, one has way more control backing up than backing down.
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Old 09-03-2012, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Monument,CO
326 posts, read 252,423 times
Reputation: 534
Does anyone know of a winter driving school other than the Bridgestone One in Steamboat Springs? I'd be interested in one closer to Denver, and not so extreme.

Thanks

JB
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