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Old 08-19-2012, 06:58 PM
 
155 posts, read 329,206 times
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As part of my research, I must let you know that my hubby is convinced that I am unable to drive. In Colorado or elsewhere. As far as I'm concerned, I'm not half bad. No accidents for at least three years, INCLUDING the times I was living in Dallas, Texas (where drivers are nutzoid).

So here's the question, is driving in Colorado really that bad? Is it truly as treacherous as my husband makes it out to be? Or is it like anywhere else where you learn and adapt and go on? I've been to Colorado numerous times, but, alas, I've never been allowed to drive to find out for myself. )

Winter? Summer? Spring? Fall? Discuss freely.

I'll quit making topics now. Thanks everyone! This really is an invaluable resource!
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:16 PM
 
20,310 posts, read 37,810,444 times
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No. Only Denver has traffic anything like nutzoid, and there is some of that there, but having spent 30+ years in the DC area (second or third worse in the nation) I find Denver to be less hectic or crazy and I've never had a problem.

Colo Spgs traffic is a piece of cake, we were here 3 months before hearing a horn blow.

Winter along the I-25 corridor sees some snow, but it usually melts quickly. Mountain driving is a whole other game, can get very dangerous on some of those roads, even I-70 which is horribly overloaded with ski traffic on weekends - add snowfall and you have legendary backups. Mountain driving in deep snow, packed snow, or blowing snow in blizzard conditions can be treacherous, but you'll let HIM drive you with his impressive skills.

Good drivers should do fine. You'll learn. Remember, millions live here and we get along fine if we are careful and don't overdrive our skill level.
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
4,624 posts, read 9,117,510 times
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Why not take a driving class? They have classes here to teach people how to drive in the snow, and you will learn lots of great car-handling tips. Before you know it, you'll be better than your husband.

I don't understand why your husband thinks that driving is so treacherous in Denver. It really isn't!
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Old 08-19-2012, 09:01 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,839,172 times
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Wink I'll take it from here . . .

Having ridden shotgun in Colorado a number of times—and if paying the least attention—then you may already have a fair idea of how motorists behave here. Not the same as behind the wheel . . . but still.

What is distinctly different is the snow, if only a concern on occasion, particularly if not in the mountains. It requires different skills, and some practice—preferably not on public roads until acclimated sufficiently. A vast and empty parking lot can be a good venue.

If a better one a dedicated driving school. Most drivers in this state have probably learned such things (haphazardly it seems, at times) by the seat of their pants. Somehow most get where they are going in one piece. However in Steamboat Springs there is a winter driving school devoted to exactly those skills. You might feign a headache, or some other excuse to be sans husband for a few days, maybe an R&R retreat, but instead with the express purpose of attending this school.

Imagine your husband's surprise the next time it snows, and on the way out the door you take the car keys from him, explaining it would be safer if you drove—with the skills (and certificate) to prove it.
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Old 08-20-2012, 08:56 AM
 
Location: On the corner of Grey Street
6,056 posts, read 7,962,938 times
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Driving here isn't that bad. Things get crazy on the highways during morning and evening rush hours and there are rude/bad drivers just like anywhere else. I'm from a pretty small town on the east coast where I never had to deal with traffic and I've adapted pretty well. I did a 20 mile each way commute from the burbs into the city for work for the first year I lived here. Snow driving...meh, just like most places there are idiots who think their giant SUV means they are impervious to having an accident. The thing about Denver though is it's very flat in the city and they do a decent job of salting the roads and plowing. I've heard they are actually worse about snow removal in the city than in the surrounding areas, but this will be my first winter living in the city, so I can't speak to that yet. If you drive slowly and with caution you should be fine. One thing that surprised me when I moved here from the east coast is that nothing shuts down when it snows. It has to be really really bad for things to close so you will have to learn to drive in it. I've heard you can take snow driving classes?

Anyway, hope that helped give you some perspective. Traffic/driving in other parts of the country is WAY worse than Denver. Just make sure you know how to merge. Some people here don't seem to understand the concept.
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Old 08-20-2012, 09:58 AM
 
155 posts, read 329,206 times
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Thank you all for the responses! I've never lived in a snowy area! In fact, growing up it snowed ONCE in twenty years in my hometown. I was 16 and it hasn't snowed since. Where I live now it MAY snow (if we're lucky) once a year. It's a big deal. EVERYTHING shuts down and we don't have things like snow plows, so you can forget driving. Those that try find it impossible.

I have one memory of an extra cold day after an ice storm headed from Ft. Worth (visiting my dad) to Marshall, TX (college). In what should have been an hour and a half stretch of road had over 31 accidents on my side of the road ONLY. I couldn't count the other side, I was too busy trying to keep my car from sliding all over the place. Even at 5 mph I couldn't drive straight. It was the scariest thing ever!
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Old 08-20-2012, 10:06 AM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,544 posts, read 11,642,242 times
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I drive a Mustang convertible and do just fine. Denver has insane traffic, the rest of the state isn't too bad, and some places you might see one other car. Touristy areas get lots of tourist traffic in summer, LOTS of motorcycles. I've seen people stop in the middle of the highway to take a photo of a deer. CDOT does a great job of keeping the major highways clear of snow and if it's so bad they can't, no one needs to be driving on it anyway. I've driven on ice in Arkansas, and the roads here are so much better maintained in winter.
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Old 08-20-2012, 10:16 AM
 
2,432 posts, read 3,266,779 times
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You'll want to be sure you have fresh tires with good tread which will help but if it is pure ice everyone slides. Best to stay off the road. The suggestion to take a driving course is a good one. When I was 16 and living in Ohio my parents took me to an empty church parking lot on a snowy day. There we practiced pulling out of skids and slides. Once you get the feel for it and know what to do it isn't too hard but if the first time you experience it is on the road, and you do the wrong thing, you can make it worse.
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Old 08-20-2012, 11:17 AM
 
352 posts, read 564,487 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaming of Hawaii View Post
Why not take a driving class? They have classes here to teach people how to drive in the snow, and you will learn lots of great car-handling tips. Before you know it, you'll be better than your husband.

I don't understand why your husband thinks that driving is so treacherous in Denver. It really isn't!
I think she meant to say that her husband thinks that her driving will be treacherous in Denver.
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Greater NYC
2,857 posts, read 4,697,320 times
Reputation: 3751
Drivers in CO are average -- not great, not bad.

Drivers in TX are worse than anywhere else I've ever driven extensively - including NYC, SF, LA, Atlanta, Boston and Denver. It's absurd, frankly. It's embarrassing. (Anecdotally, I saw 4 fender benders in a 6 miles stretch today alone. Two days ago, I saw 3 fender benders within a 1.5 stretch.)

TX drivers fall into two categories which I have written about on C-D often , 1) Dangerously aggressive and 2) I-got-my-permit-yesterday and have never heard of 'rules of the road'.

Drivers in TX are scared to death when it rains and it SHOWS.

Roads and signage in CO are considerably better than TX. Monkeys decide what signs to put up on the highways in TX and where.

Driving in "weather" in CO - snow or ice, or snow with ice - is an artform and most do it well and are well-studied in it and don't give it a second thought. My advice to you is you had better get some practice in otherwise if you are forced to drive in not-so-great conditions you may need a Xanax when your car keeps going long after you've hit the brakes. I say this based on your (or your husband's) description of your ability (and fear?).

Also, some don't need an AWD car in bad weather areas, but for those who may need a bit more out of their car if their ability is lacking OR you commute a distance (like I did) AWD makes a huge diference in ice, and to some extent, snow (although good snow tires can help a lot on their own). Further, even if you're a stellar weather driver, an AWD car will handle better and is more enjoyable to drive in slick conditions... I don't care what all you Civic-loving fools say, they don't corner like they're on rails -- especially in bad weather.
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