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Old 08-22-2012, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,607 posts, read 20,245,337 times
Reputation: 5311

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fai0607 View Post
The whole grassland/prairie/farmy areas just aren't my thing. I love mountains though, snow-capped.
All of the major population centers and economic centers, as well as all of the universities in the state (CU, CSU, UNC, DU) are located on the plains. And the biggest "city" in the state that's not on the plains, Grand Junction, is located in a desert environment. You could move to a mountain town and do the ski bum lifestyle to get it out of your system, or you can join the masses who live on the plains and visit the mountains when time/money/opportunity permits. You definitely should visit and see for yourself. But don't spend all your time skiing in the mountains, really take the time to discover what real life would look like in the places you'd realistically be living.

Quote:
For some reason it just relaxes me and I love the whole laid-back attitude in CO as well.
Are you from upstate NY or the NYC region? Almost anywhere is "laid back" (or more accurately, slower paced) compared to NYC, but life in Colorado really isn't "laid back" if you have to work for a living.

I think you're thinking about this backwards. You don't pinpoint a city/town first that you think you might like, and then find the closest school that happens to be located there. Instead, you should determine which school(s) in this region, if any, are the best schools you should attend based on many factors, and then you investigate as part of the total "package" if you would like to live there. For example, CU Boulder is a good school with a lot of highly ranked programs. It has the bigggest campus recruiting department and alumni network of any school in Colorado. VERY expensive to attend as an out of state student, but at least you would be getting a lot for your money. And Boulder is pretty much utopia for a college kid. You don't move across the country to pay those same sky high out of state tuition rates to attend some branch commuter campus that's ranked as a 4th tier "regional" college that no one outside of Colorado has ever heard of. Those schools are fine for local residents who are looking to stay close to home and save money, often working full time and going to school on the side... but not for a new freshman from out of state.

Also, getting reclassified as an undergraduate student from out-of-state to in-state tuition rates, and doing it legally and ethically, is extremely hard to do-- otherwise everybody would do it. If you plan on receiving any support from your parents at all, or going back home at all for more than a few days' visit, you'll be considered a dependent of your parents.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:52 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,178,099 times
Reputation: 9066
I don't agree that CU-Boulder is such a hot school. Much of its reputation is based on its status as a research university--a facet of it that most students never really see or benefit from. CU-Boulder also has a pretty well-deserved reputation among many employers as a "party school" that caters to a lot of out-of-state spoiled brats. I attended a small state college in Colorado and I feel that I received as good or better an education than people I knew with the same major who attended CU. As an example, I never took a class that was not taught by a Professor--usually one with a PhD--while my counterparts who went to CU talked about have most all of their classes taught by Grad Assistants until they were Juniors or Seniors.

If I were to fork out the money for out-of-state tuition, I would choose a college or university that has a first-rate national reputation for the field of study that I chose to pursue. In Colorado, for example, Colorado School of Mines has a first-rate national reputation in engineering and the earth sciences and CSU has an excellent reputation for its forestry school and veterinary program. For the OP, it make more sense to go to a college or university in his home state that has a first-rate reputation in his field of study, pay in-state tuition, get his degree--then try to get a job in a place where he wants to live. It's not the "fun" way to do it, but with education costs and the economy in the condition that they are in, the days of having the luxury of doing things the "fun" way are over for most people.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,494,281 times
Reputation: 9292
Hey Jazz, it's easy for old guys like us who have been around the block a few times, to advise the younger folks to put "fun" lower down on the priority ladder, but that advice is likely to fall upon deaf ears. I know that I was advised to do much the same, but it made little impression upon me at that time in my life, even though I grew up in a VERY frugal Pennsylvania Dutch family. Maybe you were different. I still believe that youth is a time for having some "fun" along the way, even if it's not the most frugal way to go about life, IF the money is there to bankroll the undertaking.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,086 posts, read 99,190,340 times
Reputation: 31559
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I don't agree that CU-Boulder is such a hot school. Much of its reputation is based on its status as a research university--a facet of it that most students never really see or benefit from. CU-Boulder also has a pretty well-deserved reputation among many employers as a "party school" that caters to a lot of out-of-state spoiled brats. I attended a small state college in Colorado and I feel that I received as good or better an education than people I knew with the same major who attended CU. As an example, I never took a class that was not taught by a Professor--usually one with a PhD--while my counterparts who went to CU talked about have most all of their classes taught by Grad Assistants until they were Juniors or Seniors.

If I were to fork out the money for out-of-state tuition, I would choose a college or university that has a first-rate national reputation for the field of study that I chose to pursue. In Colorado, for example, Colorado School of Mines has a first-rate national reputation in engineering and the earth sciences and CSU has an excellent reputation for its forestry school and veterinary program. For the OP, it make more sense to go to a college or university in his home state that has a first-rate reputation in his field of study, pay in-state tuition, get his degree--then try to get a job in a place where he wants to live. It's not the "fun" way to do it, but with education costs and the economy in the condition that they are in, the days of having the luxury of doing things the "fun" way are over for most people.
Your feelings on CU-Boulder are well known, as are your feelings on the School of Mines. Just going by "feelings" though, does not give any accurate information. The fact is, CU's school of engineering is rated higher than CSM's, by US News. (34 vs 61, per the 2010 edition) Again, US News is not the be-all and end-all, and sometimes such differences can be small, but it's fairly well regarded. CU was ranked third in "party-school" status this year, by the Princeton review, which is not exactly a research institution. CSM has a very strong fraternity system, much stronger than CU's, and is known for its drinking. CU also is required to have 67% of its graduating class be Colorado residents, so it's not exactly catering to out-of-state spoiled brats.
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Old 08-23-2012, 04:58 PM
 
254 posts, read 413,948 times
Reputation: 189
I want to offer another perspective. CU-Boulder and CSM are very, very different places, despite being geographically not worlds apart. Since we're going with feelings, I feel that both are good schools, but it certainly depends what you are expecting and hoping to achieve from your college experience. I think CO residents should be proud that both institutions are in the state and that they offer students very strong options for their college education. The claim that CU's students do not benefit from research suggests an inaccurate understanding of higher education.

If we're going with data, according to U.S. News, 9% of men and 16% of women at CU-B and 11% of men and 15% of women at Mines are in frats/sororities. So, they are pretty similar in that regard. Mines is not a frat school by any means. Boulder enrolls about 26,400 undergrads and Mines enrolls 3,800 undergrads, so obviously they are very different in that regard. All CO state institutions have limits (mandated by the legislature) on the proportion of enrollment represented by non-resident students. CU-Boulder is not primarily for out of state students, 64% of undergrads are CO residents. CU-Boulder Enrollment Snapshot Fall 2010 vs Fall 2011

I'd love to see your evidence that CSM is known for drinking. I've not heard that before. Coors is nearby but as you mention, CU is ranked as a top party school, CSM is not. I'm not saying either is good or bad (although I certainly do have some opinions about that), it depends on what you want out of your college experience.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:04 PM
 
254 posts, read 413,948 times
Reputation: 189
Another P.S. Colorado College (a private college), CSU, and DU (private) are all well regarded in certain fields. I am not as familiar with CC but have heard that it offers very strong academic programs and teach courses one at a time (one course for four weeks or something like that, rather than 4 classes for 16 weeks, as is more common). It is a highly regarded private college. DU offers some very strong grad programs, I'm not sure that the undergrad programs are as strong, as I am not as familiar/have not done as much research on DU, but the campus is beautiful and they occasionally have a great hockey team.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,086 posts, read 99,190,340 times
Reputation: 31559
Quote:
Originally Posted by MountainK View Post
I want to offer another perspective. CU-Boulder and CSM are very, very different places, despite being geographically not worlds apart. Since we're going with feelings, I feel that both are good schools, but it certainly depends what you are expecting and hoping to achieve from your college experience. I think CO residents should be proud that both institutions are in the state and that they offer students very strong options for their college education. The claim that CU's students do not benefit from research suggests an inaccurate understanding of higher education.

If we're going with data, according to U.S. News, 9% of men and 16% of women at CU-B and 11% of men and 15% of women at Mines are in frats/sororities. So, they are pretty similar in that regard. Mines is not a frat school by any means. Boulder enrolls about 26,400 undergrads and Mines enrolls 3,800 undergrads, so obviously they are very different in that regard. All CO state institutions have limits (mandated by the legislature) on the proportion of enrollment represented by non-resident students. CU-Boulder is not primarily for out of state students, 64% of undergrads are CO residents. CU-Boulder Enrollment Snapshot Fall 2010 vs Fall 2011

I'd love to see your evidence that CSM is known for drinking. I've not heard that before. Coors is nearby but as you mention, CU is ranked as a top party school, CSM is not. I'm not saying either is good or bad (although I certainly do have some opinions about that), it depends on what you want out of your college experience.
Oh, mostly general gossip. Any school with a big frat scene has a lot of drinking. CU's fraternities are off-campus and not part of CU, officially.

Then just for fun, there's this:

http://www.ramificationscsu.com/p/ram-pride.html
(Scroll down)
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:39 PM
 
245 posts, read 397,133 times
Reputation: 113
If you do not like New York you will love Colorado. Take a trip out here, its the only real way to find out.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:39 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,178,099 times
Reputation: 9066
Quote:
Originally Posted by MountainK View Post
The claim that CU's students do not benefit from research suggests an inaccurate understanding of higher education.
I think that I have a better understanding than you think. The research aspects of a university may benefit the students studying in the academic disciplines that are being researched, but, for those students not studying in those disciplines, the research aspect may provide no benefit at all or may even be a detriment. Often, in research university settings, the non-research disciplines are deemed of secondary importance in funding, so those disciplines may actually suffer at a research university. The average dollars spent per student and other statistical measures may look favorable overall, but some disciplines may really be shortchanged.

When I attended college, I went down a different path. I picked an in-state college with modest tuition and housing costs, but a very good reputation, at the time, both locally and nationally, in my chosen field of study. I graduated with honors with no student loans and an education that has served me very well over the years. Many of the people that I met during my college years have also remained as friends, business contacts, and professional associates all over Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West. It worked for me, and I would not do very much differently in that regard if I had it to do over again.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:47 PM
 
874 posts, read 928,358 times
Reputation: 1013
"Wasted State" has a good reputation?
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