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Old 08-22-2012, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
32 posts, read 108,759 times
Reputation: 50

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Hey everyone, I'm a 17 year old senior in High School and I'm thinking about moving to Colorado. I've been looking at uni's over there and the town and city I've been eying at are Denver and Colorado Springs.

I have a friend in Palmer Lake who really believes that CO would suit my interests just fine, and I trust her with that. Anyway, I know places like Pueblo are certainly not for me. It's too... 'industrial' and 'rural' lookin for me. I live in the Suburbs, and I would like to know if CO Springs is considered Suburban, and I'm fine with urban as well (Denver).

The whole grassland/prairie/farmy areas just aren't my thing. I love mountains though, snow-capped. For some reason it just relaxes me and I love the whole laid-back attitude in CO as well.

I enjoy snow and cold-weather so I know I'll be happy with the weather (more or less). But is CO right for me? I just don't like places such as Connecticut where it's very woodsy, I just want a suburban area with things to do. I live in a very small town that is made up of five towns on Long Island, and I can walk outside and go to Family Dollar, make a left straight down and have a plaza such as CVS, Subway etc etc... then go to another town to get art and pet supplies.

I know I sound picky but, I just have to be around some sort of stores. My cousins who live in CT have to literally drive 30 minutes-an hour to get groceries and I just see that as inconvinent.

I think I just went all over the place here but to sum up, is it considered Suburban? And here's a new question to bring to the floor: Are there any pictures of Monument Colorado? I can't seem to find any pictures online and my friend swears that it isn't a small town with nothing to it.

If anyone wants to jump in and give me advice about CO that'd be great! (i.e - general attitude, cost of living etc..)

Thanks in advnace!
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:26 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,113,571 times
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Yes, most of the Front Range is automobile-dependent very sprawled suburbia--which I personally find quite distasteful. You might like it, I don't.

As for being the "right" place to move to in order to attend college, I don't think so. Colorado's state-supported educational institutions are in severe financial distress. That means that many of them are suffering a decline in education quality. Also, one way those colleges and universities are trying to narrow their financial hemorrhaging is to charge exorbitant tuition to out-of-state residents. So, paying high out-of-state tuition for a less than first-rate education is not a very wise choice. The one exception that I can think of is Colorado School of Mines, which retains a first-rate reputation as an educational institution. But, both its admission requirements and education program are extremely rigorous. Even honor high school graduates often can not "make the grade" there, and the flunk-out rate is extremely high. And, yes, non-resident tuition is high.

Colorado does have some good private colleges and universities--Denver University comes to mind--but, again, tuition is very high-priced.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,461,314 times
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Fai0607 wrote: I know I sound picky...

The downside of being picky as you say is that it limits your possibilities.

The upside of being picky is that it provides a sharper focus of what you are looking for.
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Old 08-22-2012, 11:54 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,840,919 times
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Wink Suburban ideal

The better part of the Front Range, even Pueblo—but say from Colorado Springs in the south to Fort Collins to the north—is suburbia heaven. So you should love it. No danger of being in a "woodsy" landscape, as in this semi-arid environment trees tend to be here and there, rather than in rank profusion. Even in the forested mountains they do not grow as thickly as Eastern norms, but you can contemplate whether even that is too much from the safety of suburbia. Who knows, you might even begin to welcome the lone tree when found.

Some people choose to live 30 minutes or more out in the woods, commuting to town for services and employment. But there are plenty of places within these towns where you can just walk around the corner for a pizza; although in many cases a short drive is required to access all the many options. Denver is the only place with what might be considered a real urban city center. Other towns such as Colorado Springs have some vague semblance of that, if largely a greater conglomeration of suburbia.

Whether this nirvana is for you may more depend on how determined you are. As spoken of, one can expect to pay high out of state tuition, unless first becoming a resident. Employment is not always the easiest to secure, with competition for the better positions.

Being picky could also be viewed as focus, which can quite helpful in securing something near that desired. But you may not know enough to even know what you want. Begin with a place you have little idea of other than snowcapped mountains, or whether suburbia exists in a place which in some respects defines it. Perhaps first visit, and then pick and choose from that experience.
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Old 08-22-2012, 11:55 AM
 
20,315 posts, read 37,820,570 times
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IIRC you need to be a resident here for a certain length of time to get in-state tuition.

Here in COLO SPGS there is UCCS and the private/expensive Colorado College. The area is a nice place to live and right at the base of the mountains with much outdoor sports year-round. It never was all that industrial, though we used to have "clean" industry like Intel chip fabrication but those have long moved out. There is very little public transit here. Most of this area is suburban in nature with a small downtown that is easily walkable or bicycle friendly. The area around Colorado College is similar to what you describe in a walkable environment.

Denver has a dense core with some industry and a lot of interesting things to do. Most of the area around Denver is suburban in nature. If you seriously consider Denver, they do have a good public transit system and I'd advise you to look for places on their growing light rail system or the primary bus arterials. There are areas in the Denver metro area that also fit your walkable environment.
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Old 08-22-2012, 01:43 PM
 
254 posts, read 412,435 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
.... The one exception that I can think of is Colorado School of Mines, .... Even honor high school graduates often can not "make the grade" there, and the flunk-out rate is extremely high.
Published data do not support these statements regarding flunking out and low quality (not that U.S. News is necessarily the authority on quality, but the rankings suggest some level of quality, despite the State Government funding that has declined substantially in recent years.)

According to https://www.cu.edu/system_info/answe...nswer_Book.htm and www.inside.mines.edu/mines_only/institutional-research/2011GraduationPersistenceRpt.pdf, the proportion of first year students who return for their sophomore year are as follows:

89% at CO School of Mines (ranked #75 in the country by U.S. News and World Report)
84% at CU Boulder (ranked #94)
76% at CU Denver (ranked #128)
71% at CU CO Springs (ranked #39 in the region, not considered a national univ)

Also, note that out of state tuition rates at any of the four colleges listed above are cheaper than DU's rate (DU is a private institution, thus explaining some of the rationale for the high tuition rates.)

Last edited by MountainK; 08-22-2012 at 01:52 PM..
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Old 08-22-2012, 01:54 PM
 
254 posts, read 412,435 times
Reputation: 189
PS Colorado College and the Air Force Academy are also highly ranked institutions which enroll students with high academic abilities.
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Old 08-22-2012, 02:15 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,113,571 times
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I haven't seen stats for the Colorado School of Mine for a few years, but their graduation rates of students who make it successfully to a Bachelor's Degree used to be pretty low--notwithstanding the fact that Mines has very rigorous admission requirements compared to most state-supported colleges. It's a tough school. That said, graduates of Mines usually have no problem securing employment, though many of them have to leave Colorado in order to do so.

Colorado's private colleges are pricey--to the point that many of their students are not from Colorado; they simply are not affordable for many Coloradans. As to the Air Force Academy, it is really not any kind of "open enrollment" institution of higher learning. For that reason, I don't even put it in the class of a typical college or university.

As to the quality of Colorado's state-supported institutions of higher learning, it is a real concern because of Colorado's fiscal problems. Often, those problems are not a lack of funding (though that is a significant problem, as well), but because of some of Colorado's budgeting/taxation/spending legal straightjackets. For example, some Colorado colleges have had plenty of money in recent years to spend on capital projects--"brick and mortar"--but insufficient budget to hire and retain quality professors. So, students get to "enjoy" mediocre instruction in a pretty building. With the economy in its present and continuing state of stagnation, Colorado's higher education funding issues are only going to get worse, not better--and the quality of education offered here will likely continue to worsen from it for years to come.
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Old 08-22-2012, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
32 posts, read 108,759 times
Reputation: 50
First I'd like to thank everyone for giving me their input. I'm going to Denver this November to check out Denver, Colorado Springs and such for colleges. I was actually looking at UCCS too, which I will send an application to if I'm satisfied after a college visit. Also, I'm happy to hear that there are suburbs that I'd most likely be happy with.

A lot of you brought up how expensive it is, and compared to my state's tuition's.... it's a goldmine! I mean sure, SUNY schools are affordable but some are just not ideal for me. This leads me to my next question, actually:

Say I'm an out-of-state student attending UCCS for a year off-campus in an apartment. After a year and college year is done till next summer/fall, would I still pay OOS tuition or would I be considered a CO resident and will be able to pay in-state?

Quote:
IIRC you need to be a resident here for a certain length of time to get in-state tuition.
Does that only apply if I lived in CO (say a year) before college?
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:03 PM
 
20,315 posts, read 37,820,570 times
Reputation: 18105
Fai, take at look at this, it should answer all your residency requirements.
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