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Old 09-26-2012, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Colorado
9,928 posts, read 6,352,013 times
Reputation: 17865

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CosmicWizard: I'm thrilled to hear that. I think that teachers should be among the highest paid members of society and be able to go on awesome vacations and not be worked to death. Even with the less than perfect educational system we have here, the fact remains: You could not find enough money on the face of this Earth to compel me to spend that much time with other people's children. I just haven't got it in me.

Part of the problem with the kids is absolutely the parents. We live in an increasingly selfish society. We put our old in homes, we hire people to tend our kids while we pursue our careers (which we often must if we wish to surivive financially, let alone prosper.) And that is expensive, so the minute we can legally and safely get away with it, we're leaving our kids home alone, for at least a couple of hours...we are too tired to parent them after we get home from our full time jobs, and for Mom to stay home and tend them...even if the family can afford it, she knows she will be looked down upon as though she sits and eats bonbons all day. At least that is how I see it. We are pushed, hard, by the media and business and government, to work work work, spend spend spend, consume consume consume. That is not conducive to good parenting. Beyond the use of our time and resources, what kind of example are we setting?

How is it a teacher's problem to fix all of that, when they aren't even allowed to lay a hand on a kid, even if that kid does violence to them? Teachers are brave. Sure some work better than others with the kids and some care more than others, particularly about the subjects they may be teaching. Sure. But they've got courage I'll never have, just to walk in there and try.

Issues I've got tend to be with the curriculum. For instance: I think that music such as band/orchestra needs to be taught at younger grade levels. It is proven that success in learning to play an instrument is more likely when you start with a younger kid, and playing an instrument grows neural pathways and makes it easier to learn other subjects. Likewise with foreign languages. All students should be able to take foreign languages beginning in kindergarten.

And this thing with medicating the kids has GOT TO STOP. I'm sorry, but there is a very wide spectrum of normal kid behavior that might be inconvenient to deal with, but is way too normal and functional to be called any kind of syndrome or disorder. This just feeds into the entitlement/welfare state thinking of "I have an excuse. The world should cut me some slack." I hate it. When I put my first kid in the public school system, in Iowa, two weeks into kindergarten they brought me in to inform me that he might be "autism spectrum" and should be placed immediately into Special Education. "The earlier we act, the earlier we can help your son," I was told. I was young, in my 20's, and they even had a psychiatrist from the state capital come and try to patiently explain to me what autism was. Their basis for this, was that he got frustrated when they tried to interrupt one activity he was engaged in, to make him line up and go do something else. One day, he wasn't done with some project, and they were insisting he stop, and he crawled under a table and cried about it. Bearing in mind that he didn't go to preschool, he was 5 years old, and we were only 2 weeks into kindergarten...I think that calling that autistic behavior was an overreaction. I refused to allow him to be placed in Special Ed, or given "treatment." Found out later that this school was being called out by the community for placing kids inappropriately in Special Ed and Speech Therapy, because it got them federal funding for those programs. My son is now 13, and a smart, talented, normal, and well adjusted kid. No meds. No shrinks. He's good.
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Old 09-26-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,078 posts, read 99,155,665 times
Reputation: 31559
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
davidv wrote: So while they may have two weeks off at Christmas, they are working at least part-time most days (and without pay, I may add.) The same is true for Thanksgiving and Spring Break as well.

Not true at all for my wife who is a 22 yr veteran of teaching. She spends Christmas break in Hawaii, spring break attending a yoga retreat, and Thanksgiving visiting family in Arizona. The part about without pay, is incorrect. Like any other salaried employee, teachers are paid a certain amount to get the job done...whatever it takes.
Yes. I know a number of teachers, and few are working on school work or anything else on their days off. The teachers I know seem to love to travel, many do so over the breaks.
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Old 09-26-2012, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,223,506 times
Reputation: 3316
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
davidv wrote: So while they may have two weeks off at Christmas, they are working at least part-time most days (and without pay, I may add.) The same is true for Thanksgiving and Spring Break as well.

Not true at all for my wife who is a 22 yr veteran of teaching. She spends Christmas break in Hawaii, spring break attending a yoga retreat, and Thanksgiving visiting family in Arizona. The part about without pay, is incorrect. Like any other salaried employee, teachers are paid a certain amount to get the job done...whatever it takes.
As someone who taught, I will say that your wife is the exception in my experience. It probably comes along with her veteran status. She finally has teaching down, is probably an exceptional teacher, and has figured out how to find balance in her life. This is very difficult, especially for the new teacher. I never was able to find that balance and worked, on average, 70-80 hours a week. I tried to take one weekend day off, although I usually ended up only taking part of the day off.

In terms of getting the job done, well, as one veteran teacher (and a mentor) told me, the job of a teacher is never done. It's hard to put a price on that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yes. I know a number of teachers, and few are working on school work or anything else on their days off. The teachers I know seem to love to travel, many do so over the breaks.
And I would bet most of the teachers you know are all veteran teachers, not new teachers. It takes many years of long days and experience to not work on your days off.
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,492,187 times
Reputation: 9292
delta07 wrote: As someone who taught, I will say that your wife is the exception in my experience. It probably comes along with her veteran status. She finally has teaching down, is probably an exceptional teacher, and has figured out how to find balance in her life. This is very difficult, especially for the new teacher. I never was able to find that balance and worked, on average, 70-80 hours a week. I tried to take one weekend day off, although I usually ended up only taking part of the day off.

I agree. As she became more experienced, she brough work home less frequently, and spent less time working during breaks, but she never worked 70-80 hr weeks. That's a burn out pace.
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Old 09-26-2012, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,223,506 times
Reputation: 3316
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
delta07 wrote: As someone who taught, I will say that your wife is the exception in my experience. It probably comes along with her veteran status. She finally has teaching down, is probably an exceptional teacher, and has figured out how to find balance in her life. This is very difficult, especially for the new teacher. I never was able to find that balance and worked, on average, 70-80 hours a week. I tried to take one weekend day off, although I usually ended up only taking part of the day off.

I agree. As she became more experienced, she brough work home less frequently, and spent less time working during breaks, but she never worked 70-80 hr weeks. That's a burn out pace.
Hence, the reason I'm not a teacher anymore!
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