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Old 12-30-2017, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,579 posts, read 5,869,839 times
Reputation: 6879

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarsMac View Post
If Altitude sickness is a problem Loveland Ski area is not the best choice.

But then, most cases of Altitude sickness are caused by too much activity too soon after getting into high altitude areas, and dehydration.

Go up the night before, if possible, get a good night sleep and stay hydrated. Get a modest breakfast, and ease into the activity.
And when you feel tired, stop and rest. And HYDRATE!

Loveland and Vail both have great beginner slopes, So does Beaver Creek.
I’ve spent a lot of time on both the Loveland and Vail bunny hills with my kids. Honestly I see no reason to spend the money at Vail if all you want to do is learn to ski. Loveland is far superior from a cost/crowd/bunny hill standpoint. Vail has a lot more to offer if you are looking for a resort, but for just ski lessons, Loveland all day.
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Old 12-31-2017, 12:27 PM
 
1,815 posts, read 1,557,477 times
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Here are a couple of suggestions that I learned while teaching my kids how to ski:

1. You want cheap access. They will not use 99% of the terrain.
2. Easy to get to. Why drive all the way to Vail for a bunny slope?
3. Plan on half days. There is a point when they are tired and you are better off going home.

Therefore....

Get a pass. Preferably one with Eldora. It's an easy drive, and if you ask the parking attendant they will let you park right next to the bunny slope. The bunny slope is on your left as you enter the parking area. It's so nice to walk 30 feet to the lift! Once you master Eldora you can go to one of the larger resorts and enjoy better conditions and terrain.

Eldora has the perfect beginner setup. The bunny slope and easiest green are mostly separate from the rest of the terrain, so you don't have to worry about faster skiers. You start on the left with the magic carpet, move right to the bunny slope lift, and then move right again to a "real" lift and a short green that has one steepish spot and a few gentle turns.

I liked to go right when they opened so there were less people because too many skiers stresses newbies out. We often left about lunch time and either ate packed sandwiches on the way home or stopped in Ned lunch.

The worst place to go is Abasin. It's full of advanced skiers and they go so fast it freaks the kids out. Their bunny hill is OK, but there is no easy next step up.

Keystone is OK. It gets a lot of overflow from Abasin because of the shared pass, but Vail runs a tight ship.

We never skied Loveland when they were learning, so I can't help with that one.

Last edited by Mike from back east; 12-31-2017 at 01:06 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 12-31-2017, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,676 posts, read 1,677,913 times
Reputation: 2918
I agree with all the points above and did the same thing when my kids were learning...only at Ski Cooper. Doing this we over-nighted in Leadville. Far less expensive than any resort town.
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Old 12-31-2017, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,579 posts, read 5,869,839 times
Reputation: 6879
Quote:
Originally Posted by brown_dog_us View Post
Here are a couple of suggestions that I learned while teaching my kids how to ski:

1. You want cheap access. They will not use 99% of the terrain.
2. Easy to get to. Why drive all the way to Vail for a bunny slope?
3. Plan on half days. There is a point when they are tired and you are better off going home.

Therefore....

Get a pass. Preferably one with Eldora. It's an easy drive, and if you ask the parking attendant they will let you park right next to the bunny slope. The bunny slope is on your left as you enter the parking area. It's so nice to walk 30 feet to the lift! Once you master Eldora you can go to one of the larger resorts and enjoy better conditions and terrain.

Eldora has the perfect beginner setup. The bunny slope and easiest green are mostly separate from the rest of the terrain, so you don't have to worry about faster skiers. You start on the left with the magic carpet, move right to the bunny slope lift, and then move right again to a "real" lift and a short green that has one steepish spot and a few gentle turns.

I liked to go right when they opened so there were less people because too many skiers stresses newbies out. We often left about lunch time and either ate packed sandwiches on the way home or stopped in Ned lunch.

The worst place to go is Abasin. It's full of advanced skiers and they go so fast it freaks the kids out. Their bunny hill is OK, but there is no easy next step up.

Keystone is OK. It gets a lot of overflow from Abasin because of the shared pass, but Vail runs a tight ship.

We never skied Loveland when they were learning, so I can't help with that one.
Loveland has an entire beginner mountain separate from the main area. I think it’s the best beginner set up in the state. It’s also cheap.

I disagree with Your assessment of Abasin. There are some nice long greens and blues after you graduate from the Molly Hogan. Wrangler and Sundance are ideal ‘next step’ runs. The experts don’t go near those runs.

I do agree with the half days point with little kids. That’s why we did our kids’ first couple years at Loveland. We started my daughter at 3 and my son at 2. Even on Saturdays, we left Denver at 9:30 and were behind the traffic. We would be skiing by 11:00, then off the mountain by 1:00 ahead of the traffic.

We’re doing Vail this year because of the DEVO program, but without a place to stay I don’t think it would be doable.
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Old 01-02-2018, 09:02 PM
 
1,815 posts, read 1,557,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post

I disagree with Your assessment of Abasin. There are some nice long greens and blues after you graduate from the Molly Hogan. Wrangler and Sundance are ideal Ďnext stepí runs. The experts donít go near those runs.
Wrangler and Sundance get a lot of higher level skiers. It was a disaster. lol. Don't get me wrong though. My kids love it there now.


Quote:
Weíre doing Vail this year because of the DEVO program, but without a place to stay I donít think it would be doable.
You are going to like that. We did Beavo and then Buddy Werner at Beaver Creek and it was fantastic.
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Old 01-02-2018, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,008 posts, read 5,309,613 times
Reputation: 9651
If you are in TN as posted, Salt Lake City is easier to fly to and starts at lower elevations than CO. Any of the areas will have good beginner terrain, even Alta. You might be happiest at Park City. Deer Valley is famous for very smooth corderoy runs every morning. There are alot of steep, wide, smooth runs.
"Happy Trails"
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Old 01-02-2018, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,579 posts, read 5,869,839 times
Reputation: 6879
Quote:
Originally Posted by brown_dog_us View Post
Wrangler and Sundance get a lot of higher level skiers. It was a disaster. lol. Don't get me wrong though. My kids love it there now.




You are going to like that. We did Beavo and then Buddy Werner at Beaver Creek and it was fantastic.
Nice. After one day under her belt at DEVO, my daughter was really happy. Iím excited to see how she is skiing in March
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