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Old 10-10-2012, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Colorado
9,757 posts, read 6,277,070 times
Reputation: 17584

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
People who hate driving in winter road conditions probably shouldn't be living in Colorado, especially if their work or lifestyle depends on driving in winter. It's a fact of life here--some locales more than others, but winter driving conditions occur everywhere.
I don't generally have a choice in where I have to live, being along for the ride with my husband's military career. I mean, I could sever my family simply because I dislike driving in snow, but that'd be pretty selfish, eh?

Sometimes ya just gotta suck it up and do your best.

What kills me though, is that the whole "don't know how to drive on snow" means different things to different people. In Iowa, those big 4WD trucks and SUV's (often driven by women who really just assumed 4WD means "pretend the road is dry, the car will do the rest") were the ones usually in the ditch. I might take 3X as long to get where I'm going...but I get there eventually...

I figure if I could cope with 8 years in Iowa, I can cope with the winters here. With any luck (we're waiting on our appraisal) I'll be in my new house, watching it snow from my hot tub.
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Old 10-10-2012, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Centennial State
399 posts, read 667,256 times
Reputation: 176
If people are willing to learn how to drive in the snow in the vehicle they will be driving through the winters that helps everyone else on the road in terms of safety and time. Learning to drive in the vehicle you will be driving to where ever is the most important part since, more recently, most vehicles are equipped with stability control. If people don't know how to drive the vehicle with that added system on, it creates even more problems rather than resolves them.

Everyone picks up the slack anyways, no matter what anyone says online or in person. People will be late, and they'll try to make up for it by doing things on the road in the snow. Accidents happen and people need time to remember how to ride that certain bike, so to speak, once more every year.

Of course, having proper winter tires makes everything easier if people are not willing to learn or change old habits. That in itself makes the lives of everyone else easier if you have the kind of traction to stick to one's old ways of driving.
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Old 10-11-2012, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,455,342 times
Reputation: 9287
jazzlover wrote: People who hate driving in winter road conditions probably shouldn't be living in Colorado, especially if their work or lifestyle depends on driving in winterX.

I think you got it backwards. It's the overconfident, arrogant, I-can-handle-anything drivers who are far more of a problem than someone like myself who merely hates driving on slick roads. For the most part, I stay off the snow covered roads, and when I do out...I exercise great caution, and drive right on by the the spin-outs by the former.

Even though I don't like driving on snow covered roads, I actually have quite a bit of experience driving on slick roads from my days of living in Alaska and British Columbia. I remember one trip from Anchorage to Denver, where every mile of the route was on snow covered roads. There was no bare pavement the whole way. I wonder how often that happens?

Last edited by CosmicWizard; 10-11-2012 at 09:27 AM..
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Old 10-11-2012, 08:49 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,103,855 times
Reputation: 9065
All the drive systems, traction assists, and snow tires around are NEVER a complete substitute for winter driving knowledge and experience. An inexperienced or over-confident winter driver can get into serious trouble even with all of those things--in fact, many do, and the wrecks they have or cause are often quite serious. An experienced winter driver will know his or her own limitations, the limitations of his or her vehicle, and how to accurately read road and weather conditions. Even the most experienced driver is not infallible, of course, and, of course, they can not be totally immune from the ignorance or recklessness of other drivers--but the experienced driver has much better odds of, excuse the pun, weathering the storm.

As to Cosmic's comment, part of being an experienced winter driver is knowing one's driving abilities. Over-confident drivers are usually the ones who THINK that they have a lot more experience than they really do.
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Old 10-12-2012, 09:28 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,866 posts, read 7,098,661 times
Reputation: 1543
I'm not OVER confident, but I do have confidence. I've spent my entire driving career in areas that get insane amounts of snow, and I've driven OTR trucks in it for years. The key is to take your time, but with a sense of purpose. Going TOO slow is just as dangerous as going too fast. My rule of thumb is to adjust your speed 10mph slower for every inch of snow on the ground. Chain up if you feel its necessary.
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Old 10-13-2012, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Centennial State
399 posts, read 667,256 times
Reputation: 176
Inexperience is exactly what you remedy by OBTAINING experience with such ASSIST systems. They are no substitutes and have never been such. There are things even experience cannot do in a vehicle and that is where the systems that assist the driver attempt to accomplish. But in order to be able to do that and not negatively use the systems, the inexperienced have to experience the systems in action.
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Old 10-13-2012, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,200,201 times
Reputation: 3316
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
I'm not OVER confident, but I do have confidence. I've spent my entire driving career in areas that get insane amounts of snow, and I've driven OTR trucks in it for years. The key is to take your time, but with a sense of purpose. Going TOO slow is just as dangerous as going too fast. My rule of thumb is to adjust your speed 10mph slower for every inch of snow on the ground. Chain up if you feel its necessary.
Well, your general rule might work well when there is snow on the ground, but what about when there's not? I've driven many times through South Park ground blizzards, where there wasn't even an inch of snow on the ground, but rather, a sheet of ice. I sure as heck wouldn't want to be going full speed under those conditions.

In terms of going to slow though, I think you are correct. There have been a few times where I'm traveling at a safe speed on I-70 or other freeway during a snowstorm, only to approach an incredibly slow vehicle. Those vehicles probably shouldn't be on the road, especially the freeway, if they can't travel at speeds more than 20mph (unless everyone else has to go that slow too). It's just downright dangerous for the other drivers out there who may have to slam on their brakes to avoid a collision.
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Old 10-13-2012, 11:56 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,838,130 times
Reputation: 2615
Wink Best practice on snow

Per speed, being one good reason to avoid interstates with snow packed conditions if possible. Most of these drivers expect to drive fast on such a road; they will slow down some in inclement conditions—BUT ONLY relative to the high posted limits.

Secondary highways are far more benign in such conditions. They are generally maintained about as well as an interstate, but with lower speed limits, moreover the expectation of most that they should be lower. So one is more able to drive slowly without being run over. As well, far more options in pulling off in a wide spot to let some impatient idiot past (only not if in deep snow, and then oneself stuck). Yes, one could remain in the right lane on an interstate, presumably allowing others to pass easily; but just imagine how that will work on I-70 on a ski weekend when everyone is impatient to get to or from the slopes (or perhaps going nowhere in a two-lane parking lot) and otherwise channeling Mario Andretti (even if he wouldn't drive like an imbecile).

When it comes to any of that, by far my favorite road (if needing to be out in the first place) is some county road in the mountains, something little traveled and possibly posted at 25mph. At that speed it is hard to get into trouble if otherwise with experience, a proper vehicle, etc. Not that there are still not an uncountably large number of morons even on these roads, but they will tend to go somewhat slower, and no reason to feel aggrieved about anyone else driving a decent speed, when they are intent on breaking both the laws of man and physics. Where posted speeds on such roads are a bit higher, all this still applies—up to 35mph or so.

Beyond that, in my considered opinion, one is taking their chances. Not that one couldn't safely drive 45mph or more—hell, even over 100mph—only with necessity for far more provision for slowing down in time, paying keen attention, and at ever greater speed with just that much less chance to recover should the slightest thing go wrong. All of which brings us back to 25mph, or perhaps below. At a certain speed you might be bored—or entirely not in fighting off all the other motorists—but with virtually no chance of sliding off the road or any other misadventure. That is basic physics, and anything beyond it a compromise.

As our world often contains a good measure of that, meaning compromise, then one may end up driving faster than they prefer, or should. In most instances you can thank the unwelcome reality of other motorists for this. But also oneself if having chosen a road and route which will ensure an unwholesome measure of their dangerous influence; or, in oneself just being in a "hurry."

The surest way to extricate oneself from the snow is never to become stuck off the road in it to begin with. And sometimes that is best effected by just staying home.
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Old 10-14-2012, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,221 posts, read 4,652,783 times
Reputation: 1682
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Reading all of this makes me appreciative of the usually modest snowfalls in Grand Junction. When there is snow on the roads, my car stays in the garage and I take the bus if I need to go anywhere in town.
When there is too much snow on the roads, my car and my 4x4 stay in the garage and I stay inside and drink Hot Toddies until I'm incapable of going anywhere...
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:30 PM
 
Location: OC, CA
9,862 posts, read 13,199,006 times
Reputation: 8730
Thanks wish I would have seen this before my roofing job.
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